Hrothgar

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About Hrothgar

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  1. I've been thinking of ways to prove parallel processing for sufficiently advanced tulpa, and I have come up with an experiment. I would love it if some members of this board would participate in both parts of the experiment. Experiment Part 1: Testing Logical Parallel Processing Come up with several math problems. Make sure that they're not too easy that the answer will immediately come to your head but not too hard that you'll need a calculator for them. I'm thinking maybe triple-digit addition or double-digit multiplication. Have your tulpa solve a math problem. Note that it is integral to the experiment that the host NOT think about the math problem during this process. Once your tulpa has arrived at an answer, record it immediately and check it independently. Repeat this process for several math problems and (if you would) post your problems and results on the board. Experiment Part 2: Testing Linguistic Parallel Processing Come up with a short list of words. Show a word to your tulpa and have them come up with a short nursery-rhyme-like poem for the word. For example, after being given the word oatmeal and thinking about the word for awhile, I might come up with the following ditty: "There once was a dusty old showreel By Patrick von Gutenberg O'Neil Which showed in its clips Bears with strange hips In a land eating nothing but oatmeal." As seen before, the poem doesn't not have to be well-written or entirely sensical, but it DOES have to be entirely produced from the tulpa's own thought process. If I were to participate in the experiment, as a host I should not be thinking about poetry or oatmeal at all during the second phase of the experiment. The poem also has to be recorded IMMEDIATELY while the tulpa is reciting it to limit or stop any part of the host's consciousness from affecting the result. To anyone reading this who has a fully-formed tulpa: I would absolutely love it if you participated in this little experiment and shared your experiences. Having a diversity of data is always a good thing. Also, if you can't seem to complete these particular experiments for one reason or another, I would like to remind that your data is just as bit as important as the other collected entries, and I urge you to post your findings.