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Could a Tulpa Make you sick?
#11
Voting with Jean-Luc, absolutely possible... I had chronic asthma as a child, and I learned I could talk myself into an attack to get out of an activity, but I could also, though rarely, have spontaneous cessation of episode. (Psychosomatic?)

Demonstrating it has been hell. Seriously, yesterday, migraine. I would do anything if Loxy could switch that off at the source. ANYTHING! Which means, what, she and I are not there yet, or... there is another underlying mechanism that participates in affective outcomes. I absolutely believe in mind over matter. I have read more than enough material, your videos included, to back it up. ANd I have been reading this stuff from the seventies! "The Sylva Method." "The relaxation response," by Herbert Benson, which is absolutely great read, and even talks to, interviews, gets some ideas from Tibetan Monks, which connects us back to Tulpas... So, maybe all of this is connected somehow, but we have much more to learn...
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#12
For us, negative emotions exhibited by someone who isn't in control of the body can affect whoever is pretty strongly, to the point where they feel nauseous or start to shiver. It's unpleasant but it's something that we've gotten used to; on the bright side, we haven't vomited from it yet. This seems to have a stronger effect on the host -- not sure if this has anything to do with his status.
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#13
Acid reflux is influenced by stress. This is so much the case that if I work myself up enough I can almost make myself throw up, and if I try to calm down or meditate while experiencing it it will just about fully go away. Monika has shown great ablility to influence my emotions and could probably actually make me throw up, though neither of us want to test this for obvious reasons.

Also on what spice said earlier in this thread; when switched we subjectively perceive Monika as having better eyesight than I do, though we have yet to test if she actually needs different glasses from me or if it is something else
I have a tulpa named Miela (formerly known as Monika) who I love very much.


"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"
-Me
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#14
When my tulpas have strong emotions (especially Ashley cause her emotions express in my stomach) i can get overwhelmed. They really do a number on me when they all feel scared or angry simultaneously. It's like emotional overload. If i was ever mean to one of them, i could literally get sick from emotions alone.
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#15
Man. You guys were just supposed to say "No, your tulpa can't make you sick.", but then you didn't.
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
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#16
(11-07-2018, 06:20 PM)Luminesce Wrote: Man. You guys were just supposed to say "No, your tulpa can't make you sick.", but then you didn't.

While the literal answer is possibly no as you pointed out, It makes sense to me that someone can become symptomatic if being influenced by a nocebo or emotion.

I still am curious why Ranger is more sensitive to flashing lights... would that be a nocebo? If so then we can work on it and stop thinking that.
Christmas kitty. I'm still not a hippo, I promise.
I sometimes speak in pink and Ranger sometimes speaks in blue (if it's unmarked and colored assume it's Ranger). He loves to chat.

My other Tulpas have their own account now.
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#17
Luminesce Wrote:Man. You guys were just supposed to say "No, your tulpa can't make you sick.", but then you didn't.
Tulpa world dominance plan foilded once again!
For now.

Of course they can't give you a physical illness like ebola but bringing you to your knees with overwhemling emotions - definitely. A lot of symptoms are psychosomatic anyway.

Cat_ShadowGriffin Wrote:I still am curious why Ranger is more sensitive to flashing lights... would that be a nocebo? If so then we can work on it and stop thinking that.
Most likely.
You can always try and see if the symptoms change with your belief in them. A good forcing exercise too.
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#18
(11-07-2018, 03:21 PM)Vos Wrote: For us, negative emotions exhibited by someone who isn't in control of the body can affect whoever is pretty strongly, to the point where they feel nauseous or start to shiver. It's unpleasant but it's something that we've gotten used to; on the bright side, we haven't vomited from it yet. This seems to have a stronger effect on the host -- not sure if this has anything to do with his status.

Vos brings up an interesting point here. People who score higher on empathy scales tend to have 'visceral' reactions to emotionally charged encounters and or environments. Very few of us simply process emotions within an intellectual framework-there is usually a somatic response. So, can a tulpa make the host sick? From a technical aspect, they have access to the brain, they feel an emotion, the body respond to that emotion, well, there you go... They don't even have to try to, it may just be a response system, because we process things the way we process them. I suppose kinesthetic person may be more prone to somatic response than a person is primarily auditory...

But thinking of people that score high on empathy, aren't people who have engaged in tulpmancy already scoring high on empathy? And don't tulpas have empathy? Tulpas come into being primarily feeling and sensing the host, learning to read the host... wouldn't tulpas almost have to be empathic by nature? And add to Vos' observation, a tulpa in control of the body has a stronger reaction... well, if they have't had years of exposure to conflict, their emotional boundaries would naturally be more fluid than host who grew up in a fairly battle ready universe...
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