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Fictional character based tulpa?
#21
If I made a series of some sort and someone loved one or more of my characters so SO much that they made a tulpa version of them for themselves. I would be extremely fucking flattered.
Like do you realize how flattering that is?

Someone loving your character so much that they want them to be their personal friend is like the highest compliment that I could possibly imagine. That's the highest respect ever.
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#22
Wanting to and doing are two different things. The wanting is very flattering. Actually doing it is what is disrespectful. I point back to Iscariot's last post. You'd be taking something that's possibly very dear and personal to the creator and altering (maybe not intentionally but deviation does happen) and using it for your own purposes.

Your intentions may be good, but good intentions =/= good actions.
"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."
-Arthur Conan Doyle
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#23
I think one aspect that should be mentioned is this: There actually isn't a pressing need to tell anyone about it.

I do it more for the sake of clarity when I post, as well as for the hope of hitting off ideas about attachments and how they relate to the formation of thoughtforms, as well as how expectation may affect or not affect their being. Beyond that...a tulpa based on a fictional character isn't some kind of new strange species of thing, nor do they tend to act in an especially different way that clearly marks them as a fictional character (Except for the ones that do).

There isn't a need to flaunt the form, nor is there anything another person can do about you having such a person in your head...unless they're adamant about shaming you. It's a personal thing, and if it happens you want that form, it is your prerogative.

Maybe it is because I don't hold the work I do to a high enough esteem, or maybe it is due to being immersed in a net culture where fans would do whatever with the things they liked (fanfiction, fan games, fan sound tracks, fan sequels, fan art...). It may be because I'm aware that I'm not in a position to brag, but I'm not eager to shame people out of it.

I can say that using the phenomenon to feed one's fan obsession could be feeding a negative character trait in the person, and possibly harmful if the host does not gain some measure of sobriety. I say that because I've seen some guys do something similar and end up in bad shape for it.

I wouldn't be eager to tell the creators of some of my head folk about my condition either. They don't need to know, and I would likely gain little to nothing; in fact I would likely loose something from revealing that. But if its a secret, you don't have to worry about that as much.

Also, I must reiterate: The resulting thought form isn't like their inspiration. Instead, they're a version of that character molded by the host's personal perspective and biases. The original characters acting as an arch type of sorts, especially if they're particularly cliche in behavior.
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#24
As someone who identifies as a character who could possibly one day be used as a tulpa or soulbond? The whole idea kind of freaks me out.

It would be weird enough to know someone made a version of me who's out having different experiences. Like having a clone or something.

But it's even weirder to think of someone using my name and form but not my personality and past. Like, how is that at all flattering, that you want to keep how I look but not who I am? My character traits make me myself, and I'd be more insulted than anything if you want to somehow have a me around who's not actually at all like me.

Though I do feel obligated to mention that, as others have expressed, my host would find it extremely flattering if someone soulbonded or based a tulpa off one of her characters, and many of my headmates agree.

But just because some people are okay with it doesn't mean everyone will be, and you don't know how a character's creator feels about it unless you straight-up ask them. Honestly, this may be part of the reason my host has never been able to soulbond characters who aren't hers, despite it being a common practice. Being an author herself, she understands the close connection one has with one's own creations and so shies away from claiming to step in on that connection by taking "ownership" of a character who isn't hers.
~ Member of SparrowNR's System ~
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#25
[Hail] Got 4 active fictive tulpas, 1 semi-active, and 3 dormant ones. All of them were not intentional. I was just daydreaming too much in the past and a bit too much of a fan and unintentionally, through tons of interaction, made daydream puppets/characters into tulpas. I only realized this was what I had done some time after coming here. Never planning on making fictive natural tulpas/soulbonds. Just happened. Not sure if good or bad. I had a lot of worries about all of them at first - that they would have identity issues and that other people would try to tear them to shreds if they found out. I suggested that they take new names to help them separate themselves from their sources to better define themselves and their own life on their own and to protect them from super obvious recognition as fictives from others. The 4 active ones deviated enough that it is impossible to recognize the source for one, and the other three it would be quite hard for (even if the names do give hints). Didn't bother with the dormant ones or the semi-active one (who was dormant until quite recently). Looks like I might need to go talk to the semi-active one, but he is well aware of the situation and what he is. My worries thankfully didn't pan out. They have successfully defined themselves as they see fit and decided on their own relationships to their source characters and how they see their origin (and in the case of some of them, synthetic memories). And luckily no one has tried to tear them to shreds over their origins either. Still worry about this one happening, especially as there is more than a little chance of them crossing paths with the authors of some of their sources (going to keep it on the down low, that is for sure). Though, I've seen a few things that I do worry about with them. Gaea is afraid of what will happen if the author of her source finds out and tries to find her. Obsidian worries about the possibility that her synthetic memory might be a bit more real and that she would face great retribution when she dies if there exists an afterlife where reward and punishment are dealt. All of Tri do miss home as well.

I don't see anything wrong per se with making fictive tulpas, but I firmly believe that very great care must be taken in their creation and that thus one should not try it unless one is capable of handling that responsibly. This includes the responsibility of protecting said tulpas from people trying to tear them apart for being fictives.
Tri = {V, O, G}, Ice and Frostbite and Breach (all formerly Hail), and others
System Name: Fall Family
Former Username: hail_fall
Contributor and administrator on a supplementary tulpamancy resource and associated forum, Tulpa.io and Tulpa.io/discuss/.
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#26
I think there's an elephant in the room, here:

Soulbonds- specifically from extensive storytelling- are almost automatically going to be more detailed and realized than 'made from scratch' tulpas.

Think of a character reference sheet. Even if they have paragraphs and paragraphs about the character, they have not gotten to interact, grow, learn, etc. They are just a collection of traits and singularly espoused words. You can say they "are this" or "are that," but it takes a lot more to actually force them into being.

A tulpa is essentially a baby when it is 'born.' Whereas a soulbond has potentially an entire life experience behind them. An outlook all their own. They can be 'assumed sentient' because they're *already* considered people. They have command of language and other basics, etc.

Even among humans, environment can be a *large* part of personality, aside from DNA.

It seems to me that soulbonding is, in effect, a much more efficient, less frustrating, monotonous, and laborious way to create tulpas. So why are we so quick to put it down, just because one type happens to have a different source?

If you have not read my link about fiction vs. fanfiction, gonna put it here again since it's very relevant. https://docs.google.com/document/d/13lIm...sp=sharing

Of course, I do plan to change the names of my tulpas, because they and the story have ended up so different from the source material. They'll pick their names, I suppose.
Woodwindwhistler on www.asexuality.org

The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings. -Eric Hoffer

"We can never achieve perfection, but maybe we can approach it asymptotically. Never give up on plugging in those numbers!" ~Me

You don't get harmony when everybody sings the same note. –Doug Floyd

My poetry: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0...sp=sharing
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#27
My new tulpa is Jibanyan. I mean, it all makes sense. Yokai are unable to be seen, except with a watch, forcing is like befriending a yokai, and switching is like inspiriting. I just had to xd. Sorry for bumping. I wanted to returncjust to talk about this.
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