Stanford Tulpa Study looking for more participants
(if you're chosen they'll pay for travel and lodging!)

[General] Longbow's Tulpamancy Guide
#11
Thank you Indigo and Apollo. I appreciate the open, honest criticism. I'd like to respond to some of the points you both made, but I think I'll wait until the rest of the GAT members respond. That way if there's a common trend in the criticisms I can address them in one go.

Also, I have fixed the two typos you have found in the transcripts. Nothing else with the guide was changed, of course.
Reply

Sponsors:
Lolflash - click it, you know you want to

#12
The majority of this guide is fluff/rambling or irrelevant to tulpa creation. You repeat yourself frequently and it gets tiring to read or hear the same thing over and over. You’re not doing the reader/viewer any favors with that.

Your introduction is mostly anecdotal and really serves no purpose. The overview seemed promising since you said it would be about the structure of the guide, but like most of the guide, it’s rambly and doesn’t get to the point until the very end.

The aim of the guide is creation, but most of what’s talked about throughout the guide is optional. Section 1 seems entirely pointless on its own. It talks about how to relax. Section 2 is about single minded meditation, which can be useful for visualization, but is not required for creating a tulpa. I would have combined these sections.

Section 3 and 4 focus on Visualization, with the former focusing on the visual aspect, and the latter focusing on the auditory part. These two sections look more like a separate guide, though like the rest of the guide, they are mostly fluff. Something that stuck out for me was your claim that a tulpa’s form and mindvoice forms their identity. While some tulpas consider their forms to be part of their identity, it’s not inherently linked to them as forms can and often do change. Moreover, making their identity focused on how they look and sound will affect the way they act if that’s all that’s emphasized. They’ll be overly concerned with how they look and how they are perceived. What’s important with identity is not the external presentation, but how you feel you are, how you see the world.

Section 5 and 6 are focused on wonderlands, which again, aren’t required for tulpa creation. What’s worrying is your emphasis on the lives of tulpas inside a wonderland. Restricting them to just a wonderland will only allow them to grow so much. Not only will they have limited experiences, but they will be cut off from the rest of the world. Tulpas are more than just imaginary beings. We’re people and these sections reinforce the idea that we aren’t.

And when you finally do get to the crux of the guide, tulpa creation, you say that your tulpa is already there. That’s not how this works! Worse, you refer back to the beginning of this guide when you ask the reader/viewer to imagine a person real or fictional and say that person is your tulpa. That’s terrible advice. You also mention that you “must pay attention to the subtle mental noise you usually ignore”. So basically stray thoughts and the idea of an existing person or character. That’s a recipe for disaster, especially if you’re prone to intrusive thoughts. A tulpa is their own person and shouldn’t be made to believe that they are someone else plus random noise.

In short, this guide is mostly fluff, full of bad advice, and reinforces misconceptions of tulpas. I can’t approve this guide, there’s very little in it that’s useful. Guide rejected.

-Hector
Reply
#13
well we're back to the Submissions board making me feel bad again
sorry Longbow, standards are really high these days (but I guess they always were considering criticisms like this were always common)
Hi I'm one of Lumi's tulpas! I like rain and dancing and dancing in the rain and if there's frogs there too that's bonus points.
All of my posts should be read at a hundred miles per hour because that's probably how they were written
Please talk to me https://community.tulpa.info/thread-ask-lumi-s-tulpas
Reply
#14
Here is my review broken down into sections

Introduction
Quote:If you don't know what a tulpa is, then please go do some research on your own before you continue to listen to this guide. I won't cover that part here.

I think that a brief description of what a Tulpa is would’ve added a lot of quality here for little cost, even if you didn’t go into much detail. I do like that you asked the listener to do some research on their own though as I think that it’s important to get information from multiple sources.

Quote:Instead, please allow me to tell you a bit about myself.

Usually I don’t like personal anecdotes in guides, however this one seems to have a place for some reason, possibly because this is just an introduction.

Quote:Getting there wasn't easy though. It took a lot of time and a lot of figuring out on my own. This is the same thing you will have to do, if you truly want to have a tulpa of your own. I want to help you as much as I can, but I'm not going to lie to you either. This path is not an easy one.

This isn’t strictly true. Like a lot of things, it’s only difficult if you don’t know how or if you don’t put in the effort. If a newcomer who uses this guide has fast and easy results but believes the process to be difficult, they will probably encounter doubts about their progress, or believe that they’re parroting / puppeting. The belief that the process of creating a tulpa is difficult is detrimental because it’s really not.

Quote:The relationship between a tulpa and a human is an interesting one.

I really hope that this was a slip of the tongue. There is no distinction between tulpas and humans, even if the tulpa has a non-human form.

Overview
Quote:Their consciousness is what makes them a person instead of a posable doll. Even more so, a tulpa must have a developed consciousness if they are to make a meaningful impact on your life.  Their independent consciousness is what makes them feel like they're really there, not just how well you can see or hear them. This is why it is the goal the entire guide is centered around.

It is debateable whether tulpas have their own consciousnesses or share the hosts. I think the word you were looking for here was ‘ego’.

Quote:However, my guide is not so literal with the idea of tulpa creation. I do not focus on "tulpaforcing" as a method of forcing a tulpa into existence in your mental space. Instead, I prefer to use a more natural approach that allows a tulpa to form mostly on its own. The details of this will be covered later.

Tulpas cannot form on their own, they require forcing. If this is what your guide is going to be about then I can already say with confidence that it is going to be a terrible guide, however I’ll give it a chance in case you surprise me.

Quote:The first two sections are focused on getting accustomed to mental practices and learning meditation. These are the first steps that are necessary to take before we get into more advanced topics.

Meditation is not necessary to create a tulpa at all. In my opinion it does help with some of the other non-essential steps like visualisation, but it’s definitely not necessary.

Quote:The seventh section is the crux of the journey. It is about getting into a mindset where new consciousness entities will naturally form inside an immersive wonderland.

I am incredibly sceptical of this.

Quote:Once there, interactions and responses are used to test these entities for sustained conscious behavior. When one is found then it can be safely determined to be a fledgling consciousness which I refer to as a "proto-tulpa." The eighth section is about developing the proto-tulpa into a fully formed tulpa.

Oh no, this already seems like it’s going to be a recipe for disaster. This isn’t how this works. These ‘consciousnesses’ you are describing are not proto-tulpas, nor are they even consciousnesses. Intrusive thoughts, characters, and imaginary friends can all exhibit ‘conscious behaviour’ despite not being sentient. This is going to reinforce the potentially dangerous belief that any intrusive thought, character, or imaginary friend that pops up is a sentient being from the get-go.

Quote:At the end of the eighth section, the tulpa will demonstrate a level of consciousness that is similar to a normal human being.

You made a distinction between tulpas and humans in your introduction and I said that I hoped it was a slip of the tongue, it looks like this wasn’t the case. In my review of your introduction I said that including a brief description of what a tulpa is would add quality to the guide. I take that back because it seems that you don’t know the answer to that yourself. You made a distinction between tulpas and humans when there is none. Tulpas created by humans are humans, even if they have non-human forms. To class tulpas that were created by humans as non-human would imply that they are something external to us, metaphysical perhaps. We need to get away from this line of thinking.

Section 1: Sitting with your Thoughts
I really don’t see the point in this section or any of the exercises. This isn’t necessary like you mentioned in your overview, and it isn’t even a prerequisite for meditation either. I would scrap this entire section.

Section 2: Meditation
There is a lot of unnecessary fluff at the beginning of this section that would’ve been better left out.

Quote:This goal is to simply achieve a state of mind where you can focus solely on one simple thing, or to have your mind be clear of all thoughts entirely.

The mind doesn’t work like this. It’s not possible to have your mind be clear of all thoughts entirely. Meditation giving people still minds is a bad meme.

Quote:Yet this guide is only intended for essential skills for tulpamancy and so we will not cover them here.

Meditation is not essential for tulpamancy either, so according to your own logic you can remove this entire section as well as the previous one.

Quote:The goal of this section is to achieve a meditative state where your mind is calm and clear of thoughts, or solely focused on one simple thing for 10 minutes straight.

You are setting the listener an impossible task. If the listener is required to achieve this before carrying on with the rest of the guide (since you’ve said that it’s essential to the process) I guarantee they will quit.

Section 3: Visualisation
Quote:This is arguably one of the most integral aspects of tulpamancy

This is wrong. You can make a tulpa without visualising them at all or even using a wonderland for that matter. I would highly recommend visualising them, but to say that it is in any way integral is false. I have met tulpamancers with aphantasia who are literally unable to visualise their tulpas.

Quote:Visualization is like giving an idea to the subconscious mind and letting it run with it.

This makes no sense. Visualisation is a conscious process.

Quote:Surprisingly, this is one of the rare things humans get worse at as they get older.

Citation needed.

On a positive note, I thought that the exercises in this section were quite useful, despite not being necessary.

Section 4: Auralisation
Quote:In this section, we will cover the second most important sense: hearing.

I would argue that this is the most important sense when interacting with a tulpa, unless you are deaf and your tulpa only speaks to you in sign language.

Quote:Just as with mental images, mental sounds come from unconscious processes that are guided by our intentions.

No, imagination is a conscious process.

Quote:Think back to the example I gave for visualizing an apple. When a person does this, they don't think about all of the ideas and memories they have associated with apples. In just the same way, a person does not think about a pop song and what it means to them to get it stuck in their head. They don't think about what instruments are playing, the beats per minute or the compositional structure of the song. The music simply starts playing, either by random or by subtle cues from the thoughts the person is having.

That’s because they don’t need to, everything else apart from the appearance of the apple or the sound of the song is irrelevant.

Quote:The exercises for this section focus on imagining sounds and hearing them clearly.  These exercises should be repeated to help build up your skills in auralization.

Meh, while this may be useful on its own, hearing a tulpa speak isn’t so much about the host being able to hear them, it’s just about letting the tulpa speak.

And on the exercises, they are a waste of time. Why practise imagining these random noises when you could just practise imagining your tulpa’s voice?

Section 5: Wonderland Scenes
Quote:Yet you might be thinking to yourself, “why do I need a wonderland at all? How does this help me develop a tulpa?” The honest truth is that you don't explicitly need one. 

I agree with you here, we never use wonderlands and I even found them to be a hindrance when creating my tulpa. However, this seems to be a major contradiction as in the overview you said that the crux of your guide is “about getting into a mindset where new consciousness entities will naturally form inside an immersive wonderland.” It seems that according to your overview, the wonderland is fundamental to the process.

Quote:First off, it's a common misconception that you can merely just use your physical surroundings as the place your tulpa will inhabit from the get-go. Many assume that they can simply “overlay” their tulpa onto their bedroom, living room, or wherever they are. This is possible, yet it's anything but simple.

False. I would argue that overlay is simpler because you don’t get the glitching which plagues some people who struggle with wonderlands. Furthermore, open eyed visualisation isn't any harder than closed eyed (in my opinion).

Quote:Unless you are sufficiently advanced with your visualization and auralization you can't just jump into full imposition.

Overlaying is not the same as imposition, nor do you have to be any good at visualisation to overlay. If you can visualise with your eyes closed you can do it with them open, and vice-versa.

Quote:Third, the wonderland gives a tulpa somewhere to be when their host is busy.

This is also false. Tulpas go dormant / inactive when they are not being paid attention to.

Quote:So, if none of those reasons strike a chord with you, then you may want to re-examine why you're creating a tulpa, or perhaps just consider using a different guide.

We don’t make tulpas because we want to make wonderlands, also none of those reasons really struck a chord with me but it doesn’t matter because we don’t use wonderlands anyway.


Section 6: Immersive Wonderlands
This entire section would be better if the fluff was removed and condensed down to a paragraph or two, then added to the end of the previous section. I think having two sections on wonderlands is redundant.

Section 7: Finding a Proto-Tulpa
Quote:after all of the time you have invested, you are finally ready to begin the real task you set out to do from the very beginning.

You make it sound like the listener wasn’t ready before starting this guide, and you make it sound like only meditation experts with strong visualisation skills can create tulpas. I’ve said this all throughout this review and now I’m going to repeat myself, none of the previous sections were necessary to start the tulpa creation process.

Quote:No more steps, no exercises, no long paragraphs explaining how a particular mental skill works. All of the sections building up to this point have been to get you here. To help you realize this simple truth. Here it is:
Your tulpa is already there, inside your mind. If you want them to be there you will find them.
That's it. I'll say it again.
Your tulpa is already there, inside your mind. If you want them to be there you will find them.

I feel like I’ve been scammed. I’ve invested almost 2 hours of my time into listening to mostly fluff and unnecessary exercises, to be told that my tulpa is already there. This single sentence is enough for me to disapprove this guide. It became apparent from the beginning that you don’t know what a tulpa is when you distinguished between tulpas and humans, but this takes that lack of understanding to the next level. Honestly, this is really, really bad.

Quote:To let them in, all you must do is look for signs that a fledgling consciousness is trying to form in your wonderland. In other words, you must pay attention to the subtle mental noise you usually ignore and probe your mind for a response from a proto-tulpa.

Extremely bad advice. In my review of your overview I said regarding this section “Oh no, this already seems like it’s going to be a recipe for disaster. This isn’t how this works. These ‘consciousnesses’ you are describing are not proto-tulpas, nor are they even consciousnesses. Intrusive thoughts, characters, and imaginary friends can all exhibit ‘conscious behaviour’ despite not being sentient. This is going to reinforce the potentially dangerous belief that any intrusive thought, character, or imaginary friend that pops up is a sentient being from the get-go.” This guide isn’t just going to reinforce that belief, it is actually encouraging the act of treating them like such.

Quote:A proto-tulpa is a term I use for a newly budding consciousness that's just beginning to take form

‘Proto-tulpas’ don’t just take form on their own, they require forcing to do so, something which you haven’t mentioned once in this guide apart from in your overview when you said “my guide is not so literal with the idea of tulpa creation. I do not focus on "tulpaforcing" as a method of forcing a tulpa into existence in your mental space. Instead, I prefer to use a more natural approach that allows a tulpa to form mostly on its own.” I already told you my thoughts on this in my review of your overview.

Section 8: Tulpa Development
There is actually some good advice in this section, despite being extremely long-winded. The information here could’ve been explained in about five minutes instead of half an hour.

Summary
This guide describes an extremely inefficient and inadvisable way to create a tulpa from an intrusive thought. Most of the sections are unnecessary as are most of the exercises. There is far too much fluff and rambling that should’ve been left out, and out of the remainder of the guide that was actual information the vast majority of it was either very bad or completely false. The guide seemed metaphysical in places, even making a distinction between tulpas and humans. It claims that tulpas can form on their own without forcing and doesn’t mention any forcing methods at all until the very last section after the tulpa is supposed to have been already created, or should I say, ‘found’. The guide is very long at 2 and a half hours in total, and when it gets to the crux of it, it says “Your tulpa is already there”, despite there being no forcing whatsoever, not even any creation of a form or personality at all, none. Due to the critical issues I have with this guide I must disapprove it, and I would advise all newcomers to avoid it. I cannot recommend any improvements that would allow me to approve it because I believe the methodology in the guide is fundamentally flawed, therefore this guide is unsalvageable.

I'm really sorry Longbow, I can see that you put a lot of effort into making this.
Reply
#15
Hello Longbow. I appreciate the time it must have taken you to record this guide, but I’m afraid it does not meet the standards we have for GAT-approved guides on this site. I wanted to make sure you know that I do think there is value in your guide. I liked the exercises you detailed and I think that cultivating some of these abilities, like the ability to focus, are important to tulpamancy.

Section 1:
I could think of situations where being told “it’s all in your head” was beneficial. Your guide goes on to instruct the listener to spend 30 minutes entirely in their head. What’s bad is not being told that some things are mentally constructed, it’s dismissing these mental constructs as unimportant or unreal.

For exercise 4, sensory deprivation needs a safety disclaimer. Even something really short would do, just saying, “keep the volume of any white noise you play at a comfortable level.” Make sure that you will not be disturbed, and make sure that nothing requires your immediate attention for however long you will be blind and deaf.
Section 2:
The listener is instructed to summon up a false stereotype of meditation, but you do little to challenge it afterward.

“When you think of the word "meditation", what comes to mind?

For me, it was always that stock photo you see everywhere.  You know the one.

There’s a middle-aged woman sitting cross-legged on a sunny field, or she’s on a beach, or she’s on a yoga mat. Her eyes are closed. Her hands are resting on her knees. She is wearing a long-sleeved t-shirt and sweatpants.”

“Personally, my favorite is to simply take a throw pillow and put it on the floor. Then I just sit cross-legged on the pillow. I put my hands together and rest them in my lap.”

“Candles all around them, gently wisping smoke into the air. Perhaps you hear the soft ring of a singing bowl, or a resonating "om" of their mantra.”

“Exercise 4: Chant a Mantra [...] One example is the common ‘Om’”



The counterpart to zazen, the sitting meditation practice central to Zen and very much like what you detailed, is kinhin or walking meditation. Mindful walking is something you could bring up if you wanted to debunk the idea of meditation as sitting still and trying to reach nirvana.

Why can’t I use a fake candle? What’s special about a real candle? I understand that the flame doesn’t move on most LED candles, but what about a video of a candle? Or, outside of candles, many other objects can be used in the same way- clouds are a good one, that people in dorms or apartments can use.
Section 3:
I’ll touch on this again, but you really need to define what you think of as visualization. I wonder if you are confusing or conflating visualization with immersion, or even imagination.

“Surprisingly, this is one of the rare things humans get worse at as they get older. Children are naturally gifted with imagining things and can visualize almost effortlessly. Therefore be good at visualizing, try to tap into your childlike imagination at least a little bit. I know it’s still there, and I know it won’t hurt you to use it.”
This is the type of claim you need sources to back up.
Section 4:
I like the term “auralization.” My personal work-around has been to consider all senses under visualization, but it is nice to have other terms.


Section 5:
“First off, it's a common misconception that you can merely just use your physical surroundings as the place your tulpa will inhabit from the get-go.  Many assume that they can simply “overlay” their tulpa onto their bedroom, living room, or wherever they are. This is possible, yet it's anything but simple. Unless you are sufficiently advanced with your visualization and auralization you can't just jump into full imposition. It is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to just skip ahead to seeing your tulpa as a vivid hallucination.  That means: seeing them as realistically as possible so that they are indistinguishable from your own physical senses of sight and sound.”

Overlay visualization is not imposition. Within my own system, we used overlay visualization and find it easier than wonderland. Of course the overlayed visualizations mostly cannot interact with the environment, but you still gain a sense of “they are here with me” that you don’t get from seeing a tulpa in wonderland, as opposed to visualizing them besides you.
Section 6:
“In a wonderland, you are most in-tune with the inner workings of your mind, and will be able to experience events in a deeper, more profound way if you are submerged fully instead of floating above the surface.

It may seem a bit arbitrary and boring now, but it will soon make sense. For now, take pride in the fact that you are gaining another crucial skill as you take another step on your journey to mastering tulpamancy.”
Let’s table this.

“mind form”
I have always heard “mental form” or just “form”, but “mind form” works too.

“First, before jumping into a wonderland you can always take some time to use meditation to disassociate from your physical body. By "dissociate" I mean letting go of the awareness and sensation of your physical body as much as possible. This allows you to feel your mindform better and move with more freedom. Meditating to dissociate from your body starts off by simply relaxing into a comfortable meditation position, and making sure your body is at ease and relaxed. If you have aches or pains, if you feel tired or jittery, if you feel hungry or thirsty, take care of your physical needs before you start. After you feel centered in your thoughts, start to let go of the feeling you have of your body starting from the ground up. First, try to simply lose the feeling of your toes. Let this numbness spread gradually up your feet, and then up your legs. Then dissociate further by letting the feeling rise up your chest and coat your hands and your arms. Lastly, let the feeling rise up your neck and then over your head.”

I did not listen to this part of the video, so this might not be an accurate transcription, but there’s no “a” in “dissociate.” It looks like just a typo though, since you spelled it “dissociate” in the other uses.

I wish you had gone into a little bit of explanation as to why intrusive thoughts happen.
Section 7:

So here I will reveal to you the final secret. This is most important piece of advice that I have to bestow. It is what will help you in your journey more than anything else. With this piece of knowledge, you have already reached the summit.

No more steps, no exercises, no long paragraphs explaining how a particular mental skill works. All of the sections building up to this point have been to get you here. To help you realize this simple truth. Here it is:

Your tulpa is already there, inside your mind. If you want them to be there you will find them.

That's it. I'll say it again.

Your tulpa is already there, inside your mind. If you want them to be there you will find them.

[Pause]

Think back to the very first section after the introduction where I asked you to think of a person you'd like to meet. Now, when you took that moment to think, even if it was just a brief second, something happened inside of you. There were a hundred little ideas scattered all around your mind. Small, unrelated and abstract, these ideas were mere pieces of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. They were lost in the sea of your mind. A fragment of a memory here, a glimpse of a dream there. But then you thought about what it might be like. You thought about that person. You thought about having a tulpa. At that moment, all of those ideas started to pull together. They were drawn by some strange law of attraction, some force unknown, to become something greater as a whole. As you progressed through the sections, pushing yourself further and further, those ideas continued to come closer and closer.

Right now, they are still pulling together at this very moment. You have been thinking about them for quite a while now. So, how close are they to coming together as one?

You are now at the stage of what I call “opening the door.”

All of this time, you have not been just practicing simple mental exercises only tangentially related to tulpamancy. You have been gaining self-knowledge and mental navigational skills that allow you to traverse the landscape of your inner world. The first step was merely to be able to exist in your own head. Meditating. To be able to know what your inner world even was. Then you gained the ability to see inside yourself, perceive it visually and auditorily. This is what I call seeing the door. Then you were able to create a system for yourself to exist inside your inner world, and drew yourself in so that your consciousness could occupy the imagined, and that your psychological expanse was made manifest. This is what I call finding the door. Now you are prepared to allow another thing such as the thing you call yourself to form in your inner world. You are ready to find another conscious being inside your wonderland called a tulpa. This is opening the door.”

This is harmful and untrue. It also has a significant metaphysical tang to it, which the earlier parts of the guide did not. If this is what you want your guide to be, this should have been at the very, very start of the guide. I felt almost betrayed or manipulated. I don’t want to do exercises without knowing the real reason why I’ve learned them. Misleading the listener in this fashion is never okay. You can’t tell the listener that they thought about the tulpa and made one without knowing it.

“ For instance, you might be wandering through the wonderland one day and find a shape that looks like it could be a person or an animal. Or you might see an abstract or blurry shape moving on its own freely. You might get a sense that there is a presence nearby, one that feels like it is aware of you in some form. Or you might hear a quiet voice that sounds like it's speaking to you. When this happens, you should try to interact with the phenomenon to see if you can draw out responses from it. If your intuition was correct, then you will come to realize that the responses are coming from a forming conscious entity.

Keep in mind that the kinds of responses you get from a proto-tulpa can take many forms, and so you should open yourself up to all kinds of them. For instance, if you find a new person, animal or object in your wonderland, and it seems like it's trying to interact with you, try speaking to it in your mindvoice, or try approaching it in a friendly manner. If it does exhibit conscious behavior, it might turn towards you, make a gesture, make a sound, radiate with an emotion, or speak with its own voice.”

This is a very uncontrolled, inefficient, and confusing way to make a tulpa. It seems much more likely that a host will interact with intrusive thoughts.

“In general terms, you must open yourself up to responses and search inside your mental world for the inklings of budding consciousnesses. Yet how you go about doing this is up to you. Like all tulpamancers that have come before, and all the ones that will come after, this is a step you will have to take on your own.”

“Think about all the hidden potential brewing inside your mind, the seeds of which were laid out before you even started listening to this guide.” “You started this path because you were looking for something new. Something unbelievable. Something unreal. And now it's waiting for you right around the bend. You have the power, the ability and the resolve.

Your tulpa is already there. Go find them.”
I don’t know how you meant this to come across, but I found it upsetting and deceptive.
Section 8:
“In fact, if you feel truly emboldened and assured in your own methods, then you don't even really need to use this section.”
It’s generally not good practice to dismiss the importance of your own work, within the work.

“Of course, if your tulpa has trouble deciding on these parts of their identity, you must practice patience. Encourage your tulpa to choose a form and voice that feels right to them, but don't try and force them to make a decision. This process can take a while, so just remember that you can always come back to it later. To foster an independent tulpa with a strong sense of selfhood, you should let them have the final say over their form. You should also be careful with making suggestions, as you don't want to just convince them to choose a form that you want to see them in. IIt's important to have them decide for the sake of making it their own identity.”

I actually like this part of the guide quite a bit, along with the advice about “you will have rough spots sometimes.” The exercises are very good as well. I would recommend this section most, out of all the 8.
Conclusion:

4 Points

You MUST define your terms. It is completely unacceptable for a tulpa creation guide to not give a definition of what a tulpa is. Likewise, your definition of visualization I found especially confusing. These two things alone make most of the guide unsuccessful: if we aren’t working with comparable definitions, or if the audience does not really know exactly what you are talking about, it’s very hard to learn.
The guide was deceptive. If your belief is that, “The tulpa is inside you all along, and you must learn these skills in order to open the door to them”, and that’s the thesis of this piece, it should be at the very start. It might be a good technique in fiction-writing to have a reveal like that, but in a guide, you want to be completely frank.
Many sections could be cut. The entire guide needs to be streamlined. You ramble at many points, sometimes to the point of insulting the audience about having no attention span. This does not aid the guide in any way.
Even in a more podcast-y format, you need sources even if you don’t cite them exactly. Your guide has little ethos/credibility without them.

Thank you for submitting this guide. I am afraid I am not approving it in its current state and it would take signifigant revisions and restructuring to get it to a point where the GAT would approve it. The exercises, if extracted from the guide could be worked into something cool, if that idea interests you.

Gavin of JGC
Reply
#16
Introduction and Overview
I think talking about your personal background in a personal project is fine, but as a guide on tulpa.info it is going outside of "how to create a tulpa."

Quote:If you don't know what a tulpa is, then please go do some research on your own before you continue to listen to this guide. I won't cover that part here.
You should really just define it. There's no reason not to in this lengthy guide. 

Quote:The relationship between a tulpa and a human is an interesting one
Tulpas are human, I'd suggest "tulpa and host."

The intro puts tulpas on a pedestal, what if they aren't as devoted and helpful as portrayed here?

Quote:the most important quality of a tulpa is its consciousness
No one actually knows how tulpas work, but many have observed and would say that there is only one consciousness in the brain which is shared by both host and tulpa. However a tulpa can still act and think on their own (without host direction), which is the goal here. 

Quote:This is why it is the goal the entire guide is centered around.
The majority of the guide is focused on building focus and visualization skills. 

Quote:the tulpa will demonstrate a level of consciousness similar to normal human being.
A tulpa is literally the same human being as the host, and capable of the same level of consciousness (or utilization of consciousness). The wording here and elsewhere talks as if tulpas are different and alien entities.

Section 1 and 2
Quote:Now for a moment, I'd like for you to think back on all the times you've heard that phrase and try to pick out one instance where it was said and it actually helped someone.
Actually sometimes this can be helpful when people make situations out to be a bigger problem than they actually are. Sometimes when you get an intrusive thought it's good to take a step back and not take it seriously.

Section 1 is about the value of introspection in a world driven by external distractions, and using distractions to avoid one's inner thought life. Introspection and sitting with one's thoughts is a good exercise. Many tulpamancers struggle with focus and understanding their baseline thought processes and would probably benefit from this. It's not strictly necessary for tulpa creation, but that doesn't mean it's not valuable, helpful and worthwhile. Same with focusing one's attention in section 2.

However when it comes to meditation, some would say clearing one's mind can slow down tulpa development. Vocality for many may actually start with out-of-nowhere thoughts which are attributed to the new tulpa, which starts to build the tulpa's identity or self-schema. Clearing one's thoughts may prevent these early responses, so there is less to build the tulpa up from. On the other hand, many new tullpamancers have trouble focusing on their tulpas long enough to interact with them for the duration of a forcing session. I would say there is still value in practicing meditation.

Section 3 and 4
Section 3
I like this intro and the inclusion of descriptions that would evoke mental imagery for the audience. It points out that visualization does not appear in front of the eyes, a point that some people get confused about. And nice point on letting the mind process the images for you, otherwise one may spend too much conscious effort creating and maintaining each detail. These details are obvious to some, but I've seen a lot of people ask about them. Good exercises as well, to maintain an image for a duration of time.  

Quote:It's just meditating but also focusing on mental images that you bring up in your mind's eye.
It's not necessary to meditate while visualizing. 

Quote:Children are naturally gifted with imagining things and can visualize almost effortlessly.
This is just a generalization or stereotype.

Section 4
When it comes to vocality in and of itself, I don't see the connection to auralization, unless there is someone who does not use a mindvoice at all. As long as the host uses a mindvoice, their tulpa should be able to as well. They don't need to practice mental sounds to achieve this. However for developing a voice for a tulpa which is different from the host's mindvoice, auralization is exactly what is needed. It's nice to see some emphasis given to developing mental sounds including mental voices. 

Exercise one is actually pretty challenging as songs have a lot of detail and layers to them. Unless you've memorized a song, it's easy to forget the lyrics or how one part transitions into the next.

Section 5 and 6

Quote: I believe that having a wonderland helps with the development of a tulpa to such a degree that it should be learned by default.

Should one use a wonderland? Some use presence imposition and open-eye visualization to place their tulpa in the real world. Some visualize their tulpa with no background instead of using a wonderland. These are perfectly fine ways to interact with a tulpa before full imposition. This is a wonderland focused guide, and that's fine, but there's no need to try and talk the audience out of other options. If someone sees the value of wonderland immersion, that's all that's needed to use a guide on wonderlands. If not, they can use a different guide. Visualization and wonderland immersion are not required or crucial unless that is the tulpamancer's goal.

Quote:During times like these, a tulpa can choose to exist in the wonderland instead of going dormant, sleeping or existing in a black void of nothing.
There isn't much evidence that this is possible. I've met very few tulpas who claim to be able to do this. The idea that this kind of thing is an option for everyone from the get-go is a myth from the early days of tulpamancy. The trouble with this belief is that a tulpa may get less attention if the host believes they are active somewhere unseen in the wonderland. 

And my last criticism here is the guide is too repetitive about how a wonderland is a home for host and tulpa. 
The exercises are good.

Section 7
Here is where I have big problems with this guide. 

Quote:You thought about having a tulpa. At that moment, all of those ideas started to pull together.
I've heard of tulpas forming while researching or planning, but that's not a guide or creation method. It's not helpful at all to say that the work on previous sections was helping a tulpa to form somewhere in the mind. 

Quote:Sometimes a response can be a sort of garbled mental sound that feels like it has the idea of what it's trying to say pinned to it, like a post-it note. This garbled kind of mindvoice is referred to as "tulpish" and it can usually be understood by the host without hearing the vocalization clearly.
I don't think tulpish needs to involve any garbled mental noise--it's just pure thought, images, ideas conveyed without mindvoice by most definitions.

Quote:When you experience a response from a proto-tulpa, it will have a quality that seems alien and "other."
 For many, tulpa reponses do not feel alien, and many hosts are plagued with doubt due to this expectation of alien responses. I find early vocal responses are often not alien, but over time as a tulpa develops things feel more distinct. Emotional responses I would say feel alien, but this could take days, weeks, or months to happen. Are hosts supposed to look for alien feeling proto-tulpas for that long, instead of focusing on one forming tulpa?

With this method, there's the danger of taking any intrusive thought to be a tulpa or "proto-tulpa." Tulpamancers are already prone to taking intrusive thoughts seriously. Some create/accept more tulpas than they planned due to seeing or hearing unexpected thoughts. Talking to intrusive thoughts is one way to make a tulpa, but I think this approach is best avoided, especially if it leads people to treat further odd mental images or thoughts as proto-tulpas/new tulpas. Especially if the host already has a tulpa, tulpas after the first usually develop much more quickly and things could get out of hand easily. 

Quote:For example, if you experience a response that seems genuinely "other," but then the subsequent responses feel too similar to your own thoughts, you can choose to stop the interaction or to keep going. If you stop, then that's it.
It's extremely common to hear responses from a young tulpa that feel like the host. This will happen to most if not all, and responses may go back and forth between sounding distinct and sounding like the host. Discarding a forming tulpa for not always feeling alien early on is bad advice. Responses should be nurtured and encouraged and will typically feel more distinct over time but not from the start. 

This "is it a tulpa or not" method I find strange and not helpful. When one decides to create a tulpa, they work on creating that one tulpa, not testing and discarding one after another. And we really don't need to be giving the brain the idea "hey, there are tons of potential tulpas here, some partially worked on and abandoned which could be growing somewhere." One shouldn't expect budding consciousnesses to be randomly appearing in one's mind. 

There's also an overall air of tulpas being mysterious mystical entities rather than something quite like the host in nature and existing in the same mental space. I feel it gives the wrong impression. 

I could see this method of finding and nurturing a proto-tulpa working for people who would have created a tulpa very quickly anyway, or for those who already have tulpas or headmates. But due to the danger of uncontrolled system expansion from the mindset encouraged, I cannot approve this method.

Section 8
The audio repeats a sentence from the last paragraph on page 3 of the transcript.

Nice section on active/passive forcing and habit building. Good exercises.

It's great to have one's tulpa choose their own form and voice, but it's also fine to choose an initial form to start with.

Overall, I like Sections 1-6 and Section 8. They provide good info and exercises for creating a visualization based tulpamancy experience. The intro and overview are somewhat extraneous for a guide on this site, but fine for a youtube series in my own opinion. Section 7 is my main issue, as well as how the guide treats tulpas as "not human." Due to my concerns over Section 7, I cannot approve this guide. 

If this guide (the transcript) was edited to address the issues mentioned by myself and others and to be more concise, I could see it being accepted as a text based guide.
My tulpa Aya writes in this color.
Reply
#17
•intro:
Quote:If you don't know what a tulpa is, then please go do some research on your own before you continue to listen to this guide. I won't cover that part here.
this is exactly the sort of thing that you should be covering in a creation guide

I think that you hype up how difficult it is to make a tulpa. some people have lots of difficulty, but most don't, and it sounds pretty intimidating the way you put it

it would have been good if you actually told people of some of the responsibilities of having a tulpa instead of just asking people to research it on their own.

overall, an intro should say what a guide is about and why it's useful. this does a pretty good job at going over why it's useful, but a pretty poor job at saying what it's about

•overview:
I don't have much to comment about this section, but it does it's job and I think that it's pretty good

•section 1:
the amount of rhetorical questions that you ask in the beginning is quite distracting

otherwise this section is pretty good

•section 2:
you say "now that you know the different poses", but you never actually explained what the different poses are.

I don't think that you emphasize enough that meditation is the sort of thing that you should be doing once or twice every day or that to best gain the benefits of meditation, you should continue to meditate after meeting the 10 minute meditation goal

section 3:
you don't need nearly this many metaphors to explain what visualization is

section 4:
why do all the exercises require waiting 30 minutes?

section 5:
saying that you can't visualize your tulpa onto the real world is blatantly false. visualizing a tulpa onto the real world is no more difficult a task than visualizing them in a wonderland and many inexperienced visualizers can do it. furthermore, being able to do anything without it affecting the area can have it's own uses, you can mess around with people while they are completely oblivious.

parallel processing is a highly controversial subject and you can't just assume that it is possible like that.

this section goes over things that you should already pretty much have down by this point, so I think that it would work better if it was combined with section 6.

section 6:
I think that you are overcomplicating this whole movement thing. most people who I've talked to find that moving is pretty intuitive and don't need to worry about imagining two perspectives then transitioning between them

section 7:
this method is incredibly inefficient and encourages walk ins. i won't go into too much detail since others have already pointed this out though.

the phisical cause to headpressures (or if there even is one) is unknown to my knowledge. if you have a source on it being caused by blood then I would love to see it, otherwise you should make such a statement.

section 8:
not much to say about this section, but it seems pretty useful. it would be nice if it were closer in length to the other videos, but it is understandable that this one is longer since it covers a much broader topic.

overall:
-it's not good to call hosts humans because it implies that tulpas aren't human
-it's also not good to call a tulpa "it", for similar reasons
-I like the slow, relaxed pace of the guide
-the idea of having goals for each section is a good one, but none of the goals themselves make much sense as something that a tulpamancers needs to have before they can move on
-sections 1-6 were all about things that are useful for a tulpamancer, but really the priority should be on making a tulpa and then you can work on those things later, ideally with your tulpa
-the video format of this guide makes odd phrasing much less distracting since the video goes on and gives more context rather than reading where once you get to something odd you would stop and get stuck trying to figure it out for a bit.


this guide has lots of good information, however the overall method is very inefficient. I would be willing to approve individual sections as shorter guides on these individual topics if they were given a bit more polish, but as a whole I cannot approve this as a creation guide
I have a tulpa named Miela (formerly known as Monika) who I love very much.


"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"
-Me
Reply
#18
Overall, this draft has a lot of issues, but the majority of errors can be fixed with further revision. The approach is interesting and you offer some interesting advice, however your lack of organization, writing style, and tone distracted from the content and reduced your ability to effectively communicate your ideas.

The first major issue with this guide is the lack of organization. Your content does not always match your original thesis of the section, and in several places you start to ramble, go off-topic, and repeat yourself. If you plan on revising, make sure each paragraph relates to the thesis of each section.

The second major issue is you are trying to entertain or leave the listener in suspense, which isn’t necessarily helpful for your guide. While these elements would be greatly appreciated in a narrative written about your tulpamancy experiences, they distract from the guide and can dilute its clarity, leading to fluff, confusing your listener, or making them angry or feel cheated. This can greatly turn off your listeners, and it definitely tuned off the other reviewers, especially the 'plot-twist' in section 7.

The third major issue is your tone and word choice in various parts of your guide. It appears that you embraced the idea you are the master and your listener is the student, and this comes off as annoying, insulting, unprofessional, and in some cases patronizing. Sometimes you come across as "I'm so much smarter and better than you and you're such a stupid noob" when you use diction to illustrate that relationship. In addition, the places you use this mindset can generally be replaced with further elaboration. For example, instead of saying "Baby steps my novice tulpamancers", explain why those small steps are important.

I broke down the main problems with each section one-by-one here:

Introduction:
‘longbow’ Wrote:The relationship between a tulpa and a human is an interesting one.

Tulpas are human just as much hosts are. Saying otherwise may cause problems



Otherwise, this section gets a little fluffy because it's written more like a narrative. I don't believe this is a major issue, but it's a little distracting and makes the product feel less guide-like.

Overview:
‘longbow’ Wrote:It can be based on a real person, or fictional one.

This can cause problems down the road if the host expects their tulpa to act a particular way.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Alright, so now you get the general idea.

As your listener, I'm ready to move onto the next step of your process, not listen to a list of your overview. This is a neat little section, but the timing of it being here is awkward.

‘longbow’ Wrote:In my opinion, there's nothing wrong with taking some time to review things you already know.

There is a lot of fluff here. Some of these main concepts taking up paragraphs can be boiled down into one. For instance, you could probably tell me that these exercises have goals, they're suggestions, and then end there instead of going on about how your guide is not like other guides and how artists appreciate art.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Now, let me briefly go over the sections of this guide to explain what will be covered in each one.

I'm on page 3 of 4, and you are now going over summaries of your guide. I thought you would introduce them here on page 1:

‘longbow’ Wrote:I recommend listening to all sections and trying out the exercises even if you feel that you have sufficient experience in the aspect I'm describing. This guide is intended to cater to those who have no experience with tulpamancy, meditation or visualization, and as such it will start from the basics and then work upwards to more advanced mental practices. If you are coming from another guide, have already created a tulpa, or have experience with the aspect described in a section, then you can choose to skip it. But be warned that you are doing so at your own discretion.

Instead, you started talking more about your guide's worth than the actual overview. This is a major organizational flaw.

‘longbow’ Wrote:So if that all sounds agreeable, then let's move on to the first section and dip our toes in the water.

Oh, but there is one last thing I'd like to talk about first.

The "Oh, but there is one last thing" is a symptom that the paragraph is in the wrong place, and or your thesis for the section needs revision.

* * *

After that paragraph, you give some scheduling advice, but it feels out of place. You may be better off introducing the scheduling advice in the next section.


S1: Sitting with your thoughts
Starting off, it felt like you were writing an editorial on why we should meditate. It became off topic, especially since it took a page to get it out. The editorial style invites too many narrative elements that need to be revised or taken out.

‘longbow’ Wrote:The practice of tulpamancy is mentally focused.  Everything that happens in the later sections will happen inside your mind.  A tulpa is created in your mind. After all, that is the place where your own consciousness exists. Also, you will interact with your tulpa in your mind, even if they are imposed into the real world. You may treat them as an external entity, but the exchange always truly happens inside your cranium.

This paragraph seems to say the same concept over and over again. This can be boiled down to one sentence.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Baby steps, my novice tulpamancers. Baby steps.

There are a couple problems here. First, "my novice tulpamancers" is an example of the master-student tone coming across as distasteful and annoying. Second, You didn't introduce the idea you could practice for 5 minutes until after you said "baby steps". This comes off as contradictory.

‘longbow’ Wrote:While sitting, try to let your thoughts flow freely in your mind. Try to wait out distracting thoughts instead of acting on them.

What is a distracting thought? You said in this section that distractions are playing on your phone and whatnot, and the previous three exercises are just focusing on letting your thoughts wander. What is this supposed to mean given the section's definition for distractions?

S2: Meditation
‘longbow’ Wrote:Regardless of what you know of meditation already, know this: Meditation is much simpler than it's built up to be.

This general part of the section feels really off topic, and it has similar editorial-like vibes from it. I don't believe dwelling on the stereotypes for meditation are necessary, but if you feel they are purposeful, then I would sum them up briefly in a paragraph or less.

‘longbow’ Wrote:It also allows for insight into controlling mental phenomenon in general.

I believe you go off topic here. Some of what you say you already said in the previous section, the parts on intrusive thoughts seem to come out of nowhere.

‘longbow’ Wrote:So now that you have your location picked out and you know about the different poses, [...]

You didn't describe the other poses, you just mentioned them.

S3: Visualization
‘longbow’ Wrote:This is arguably one of the most integral aspects of tulpamancy, as it allows for a tulpamancer to see their tulpa and what they're doing.

It's not integral to tulpamancy since visualization is optional, however it is integral to your method. Rewording this would fix this issue.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Visualization is not very complicated.  It's just meditating but also focusing on mental images that you bring up in your mind's eye.

Not all forms of visuaization are dependent on meditation. You can visualize memories without meditating for instance.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Once again, the key is to simply imagine and let the brain work behind the scenes. Visualization is like giving an idea to the subconscious mind and letting it run with it. You must give your attention to the result of what you're imagining, but not how it's being made.

In some cases "once again" can be used to emphasize a point, however in this case it feels like this concept and this paragraph are redundant.

S4: Auralization
‘longbow’ Wrote:In the previous section, we covered sight, the sense that humans rely on the most.

This is false, you discussed visualization, not visual imposition. This needs to be rephrased.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Think of it this way: seeing is to visualization as hearing is to auralization. To visualize something is to see it in your mind, and to auralize something is to hear it in your mind.

Organizational wise, this would make more sense if introduced earlier. You can combine it with this part:

‘longbow’ Wrote:There is a "mind's ear" in just the same way that there is a "mind's eye," and it is important that we learn how to use it properly for interactions with tulpas.



‘longbow’ Wrote:Developing your mind's ear allows you to be more sensitive to the quiet vocalizations of a fledgling tulpa, allowing you to focus on them instead of other kinds of mental noise.

I don't think learning how to recreate mental noises will help a beginner focus on their tulpa more easily. If anything, I would imagine it being distracting.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Additionally, the tone, accent and lilt of a tulpa's voice voice can be more clearly defined by practicing auralization. This results in their voice becoming more distinct and tailored to their personality. And I would argue that a well-defined voice is just as important for a tulpa's identity as having a properly visualized mental form.

The first sentence is fine, but then explain to me briefly how auralization will achieve those things instead of telling me how great auralization is.

‘longbow’ Wrote:This will not sound like an auditory hallucination. Instead it will sound like those times when you get a song stuck in your head. I think chances are about 99.99% that this has happened to you at some point in your life. Maybe you don't remember it.  But maybe you do remember that one time you couldn't get that catchy pop song out of your head.  Just when you think you'd forgotten about it, the song would come up again and again. Maybe it wasn't a song but a commercial jingle you heard on TV.  You know, the ones that are designed to get caught in your head just to sell some product. Any way, one way or the other, you've had some song playing in your head. Your mind was chiming out a song to your mind's ear as if it was as simple as dropping the needle on a record.

I crossed out the part where you got off topic. You didn't need to go on and on with your example, especially since you're confident 99.99% of your audience has experienced this before.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Another way to think about it is when you play out an argument with someone in your head.

I'm surprised you didn't include the most obvious example of auralization in this section- your own mindvoice. Is there a particular reason you didn't want to include it?

S5: Wonderland Scenes
‘longbow’ Wrote:Yet you might be thinking to yourself, “why do I need a wonderland at all? How does this help me develop a tulpa?”

The honest truth is that you don't explicitly need one. I'm not going to lie and say that isn't the case. Yet I believe that having a wonderland helps with the development of a tulpa to such a degree that it should be learned by default. And I'm going to explain my reasons why.

It's unclear what you mean here. I found 2 different interpretations for what you said:

"The honest truth is that you don't need one. [So,] I'm not going to lie and say that you do [need a wonderland]."
vs.
"The honest truth is that you don't explicitly need one. I'm going to say that isn't the case."

The former is saying the same thing twice, the latter is a contradiction. You are best off removing the second sentence and joining them. You can also take out "I'm going to state my reasons why". It would look like this:

‘longbow’ Wrote:Yet you might be thinking to yourself, “why do I need a wonderland at all? How does this help me develop a tulpa?”

The honest truth is that you don't explicitly need one, but I believe that having a wonderland helps with the development of a tulpa to such a degree that it should be learned by default.



‘longbow’ Wrote:You must use your internal senses to see them in an internal copy of your physical environment. Essentially, you are creating a mental copy of your domicile and then putting your tulpa in it. At this point it's really not much different than just creating a wonderland. You're just making a wonderland of your surroundings, one that you will be tempted to interact with physically, or check on to make sure you're copying everything correctly, thus distracting you from your internal senses.

Overlay visualization isn't the same as creating another wonderland. You can "impose" mental images onto reality, but you need another wonderland if you or your tulpa venture beyond the field of vision. For example, an alternate mind-camera angle of reality would be another wonderland, where drawing your tulpa sitting on a chair in the distance does not require another wonderland.

‘longbow’ Wrote:A tulpa will not be able to physically interact with the world your physical body inhabits. It's a simple fact.

If the tulpa is possessing the body or switched in, then yes they can.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Third, the wonderland gives a tulpa somewhere to be when their host is busy. As much as we hate to admit it, there are many times during a tulpamancer's life where it's not possible to give attention to a tulpa. Work, school and social engagements are all times when the host will have to leave the tulpa to their own devices. During times like these, a tulpa can choose to exist in the wonderland instead of going dormant, sleeping or existing in a black void of nothing. This gives them a sense of personhood, in that they can simply be a person existing in a place on their own when the host isn't watching. The wonderland provides this, and it encourages sentience and separateness with your tulpa.

This implies parallel processing, which isn't proven to be possible. A host that works to keep the wonderland active while working is different, but tulpas being active outside of their host's attention is not.

‘longbow’ Wrote:So, if none of those reasons strike a chord with you, then you may want to re-examine why you're creating a tulpa, or perhaps just consider using a different guide.

I won't take it personally. I only wish for you to get the kind of help you're looking for. However, this guide heavily uses wonderlands so you might be better off with something else.

This should have been made clear long beforehand in your overview or introduction.

* * *

Since you describe creating a mindform in the next section, the exercises for this section do not make tons of sense without a mindform. “You are in the foothills” implies that the listener needs to be in the picture where “imagine some foothills” implies that the listener is behind the 4th wall or seeing the image from a 3rd person perspective. Changing the language will fix this problem, unless you may decide to switch sections 6 and 5.

S6: Immersive Wonderlands
‘longbow’ Wrote:One of the first things to consider when delving deep into a wonderland is how we will chose to ground ourselves inside of it. To truly immerse into a wonderland, many tulpamancers use what it commonly referred to as a "mind form."

First of all, this section is less about immersing with your wonderland and more about how to create a mindform for the host and move about.

With that mentioned, I recommend considering the following: You can better connect these sections if you point out that you first need a place to be (wonderland), then you need a body for yourself, then you need a body for your proto-tulpa. Right now, the order of you need a place to be, you can better immerse yourself, and now you can find your tulpa makes less sense.

‘longbow’ Wrote:It may seem a bit arbitrary and boring now, but it will soon make sense. For now, take pride in the fact that you are gaining another crucial skill as you take another step on your journey to mastering tulpamancy.

A couple problems here. First, avoid telling the listener how to feel. If you are afraid your listeners will be bored, you should revise your draft or cut things out. Second, telling the listener to be proud as they work on their tulpamancy journey feels like it’s tapping into that master-student tone. Saying that this is a crucial skill is fine, but it may be better to take out the journey to mastering tulpamancy part.

‘longbow’ Wrote:First, before jumping into a wonderland you can always take some time to use meditation to disassociate from your physical body.

This part of the section in general is confusing for me. First, you talk about having difficulty moving a mindform, then you talk about dissociation from the body irl and association with the mindform, and then you mention some people are pros at controlling their mindform and you introduce the topic of hosts struggling with their mindforms? To prevent repeating yourself, please reconsider the organization of this section with the mindform as the focus instead of just wonderland immersion.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Now, it's easy to react with frustration and anger when things happen like this, but doing so does not help you. Getting riled up will just draw more of your attention towards the unwanted action or behavior. It is similar to how unwanted thoughts work in the meditation section, so we can deal with them in a similar way.

The following section starts to get off topic since you spend multiple paragraphs explaining how to counter intrusive thoughts and frustrations instead of just one. I recommend relating this to the mind-form more so it makes more sense.

* * *

Your exercises feel like more advanced exercises for the previous section. I’m not entirely sure how creating a mindform relates to these exercises either, given the context of section 5. If you decide to change the language, being in the scene makes more sense. If you decide to switch sections 5 and 6 around, you may want to consider merging both sections and their exercises together.

S7: Finding a Proto-Tulpa
‘longbow’ Wrote:This is most important piece of advice that I have to bestow. It is what will help you in your journey more than anything else. With this piece of knowledge, you have already reached the summit.

The core fundamental problem is this shouldn’t be a surprise for your listener. Guides don’t really need plot twists, especially if this is the most critical information you can give a new tulpamancer.

‘longbow’ Wrote:When you experience a response from a proto-tulpa, it will have a quality that seems alien and "other." It will not necessarily be like an alarm bell ringing in your mind saying "this is a proto-tulpa," but rather it will have an intriguing intention behind it, and seems to come from an entity separate from yourself.

I’m pretty sure I know what you’re talking about, but your description is unclear and the following example is also unclear. I believe you are trying to say a “proto-tulpa” will provoke the host’s feelings or grab their attention in an unexpected way, and or the host will feel some deeper “connection” with their “proto-tulpa”.

This isn’t false or bad advice, it’s just the wording is rough and the unnecessary hype you try to build distracts from the guide. I have headmates that were formed like how you are describing “proto-tulpas” here, some even created out of an effort to look for something that wasn’t there.

The middle part of this section is fine, it just needs further revision. If you feel the need to say “also” or “but I should mention this”, then you need to think about how you want to order your points so they make more sense.

I like the part where you say the tulpamancer has the choice to accept a response as a tulpa or not, but you also should emphasize that not every response is a potential tulpa, since not doing that could lead to your listeners being prone to system overpopulation. Otherwise, this section comes across as saying tulpamancers don't have control over their own minds, which isn't true.

S8: Tulpa Development
‘longbow’ Wrote:Since your tulpa is still just starting to form, keep in mind that your interactions with them will be mostly one-sided.

This makes me wonder why this wasn’t in the proto-tulpa section.

* * *

For Section 8, you have your exercises broken up into categories, and I feel like the order of your exercises should line up with the order of this section. Redrafting this section to add this consistency will make your section make more sense.

‘longbow’ Wrote:In this section you will develop your tulpa's consciousness and selfhood by interacting with them consistently, devoting your attention to them, and helping them form their sense of identity.

At first it seems you stay somewhat on-topic, and then this topic sentence arises:

‘longbow’ Wrote:Essentially, it helps incorporate the sort of thinking you do in your wonderland sessions into your daily cognition by building subconscious habits.

At this point, you go off-topic. Since the off-topic content is stuff you may wish to add to your guide, I recommend going back and revising your thesis to give your listener an easier time following your content.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Exercises for Selfhood

Feels more like exercises for visualization and vocality, not identity work. This section title does not make sense with the content.

‘longbow’ Wrote:Exercise 5: Information Hiding Games
Hiding information from your tulpa without the idea of parallel processing is dysfunctional and won’t be good enough for playing a game like this. While this may be somewhat entertaining for the host and their tulpa, I doubt it adds much value to your guide.

After revising your organization and taking out all of the over-the-top narrative and master-student tone parts, you will have a much stronger draft and the length of your guide will be greatly reduced. I understand that working on this guide and the audio clips that went with it took a long time, however I believe taking the time to look over your guide and revise it will be worth it. There is no section that has content I would throw out, but you may find it convenient to merge some sections together or reorder things.

If you take the time to revise this guide, I will gladly look over your second submission and reconsider approval.
I'm Ranger, Gray's/Cat_ShadowGriffin's tulpa, and I love Hippos! I also like forum games and chatting about stuff.
My other head-mates have their own account now.
Temporary Log | Chat | Yay!
Reply
#19
I am not a GAT member but I'll add my two cents. I agree with some of what GAT members have said here, but not all of it. Many of their criticisms are based on the idea that your guide includes many things that aren't absolutely necessary for creating a tulpa. This is true - but that is not a bad thing. I do not see any reason why a guide should be boiled down to only the things that are required in order to create a tulpa. Sure, that can shorten the guide and make it take less time and effort to read, but many people are willing to read (or in this case, listen to) longer and more in depth guides, not everyone will only be willing to read a short and basic guide. Also, there are many benefits to longer guides that include things that aren't 100% necessary for tulpa creation. I have found that people often have a faster and easier time creating a tulpa when they have already practiced skills that can come in handy for tulpa creation and have built a good mindset for tulpa creation BEFORE they start creating a tulpa, which is exactly what your guide does. No, nobody needs to do this to create a tulpa, but it definitely helps and is likely to make things faster and easier once you start creation. If you keep a guide to only what is required, these helpful aspects would not be included. Also, if all tulpa guides were kept to only the required basics, they would be much less interesting and diverse, because when you boil down tulpa creation to it's bare bones, it's actually very simple. They would all be saying the exact same things in slightly different wording. There should be diversity among guides, as there is not just one way to create a tulpa, and some ways work better for people than others, so newcomers benefit from having a wide variety of different techniques to read about.

Regarding people's criticisms on mentioning parallel processing - it has not been proven to definitively exist or not exist, so the idea that it shouldn't be included just because it hasn't been proven to exist doesn't make sense. Even tulpas have not been proven to exist in the way that most people in this community think about them. Might as well disapprove every guide on the site because they all assume something exists when it hasn't been proven, right? Some will say that parallel processing doesn't exist because multitasking in the way it is generally thought of has been strongly indicated to be impossible by some studies, but that is not a good argument as parallel processing isn't necessarily the exact same thing as multitasking, all studies on multitasking have had nothing to do with tulpas/plurality, and there is nothing to indicate that being plural doesn't change some things about how the brain works. Creating a tulpa is very similar to learning a new skill, and learning a new skill of course changes certain things about how the brain works. For example, learning to play the piano paves entirely new neural pathways that did not exist before. Why tulpamancy is so often assumed to be an exception baffles me.

I can see why some people have concerns about you saying that "your tulpa is already there", because that isn't always true, but that mindset actually helps tulpa creation. If you assume that your tulpa already exists, that they are conscious and listening to you, this actually helps your tulpa start to exist. The reasons for why this is are complex so I'm not going to explain them here. There is no harm in believing your tulpa is already there even if they aren't, because that belief will make them actually be there faster than they probably would be otherwise.

Your guide is not perfect but I believe it is much more worthy of being approved than most GAT members think. In my opinion the standards for guides are unnecessarily high and specific. Almost nothing is going to be approved at this rate, and I've already seen some people (including myself) who have decided not to submit guides for review solely because of the GAT's standards. I encourage everyone to look at unapproved guides just as much as you do approved guides, as many of them are just as good as those that have been approved. Use your own judgement to decide which guides are good and which aren't, don't rely on the GAT's judgement.
Reply
#20
I don't know where people get this idea that we have some list of "standards" we're all collectively using. We have general guidelines to go off of like accuracy, usefulness, etc., but other than that there isn't some litmus test for whether or not a guide should get someone's approval other than their own personal opinion. A guide needs 4/7 approvals to be officially approved. That's 57%, not even a passing grade on a quiz. If that's too high standards, feel free to make a thread about it in GAT Discussion and we can see about revising it.
I'm Indigo Blue, the "Sky Dragon" of the Felight family. I'm a tulpa born October 2017. My systemmates are Radio, Apollo, & Piano. Form images: 1 2
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Sponsors:
Lolflash - click it, you know you want to