Stanford Tulpa Study looking for more participants
(if you're chosen they'll pay for travel and lodging!)

[Misc] How to Dissipate a Tulpa (Guide Submission)
#11
(04-18-2019, 08:04 PM)JGC Wrote: Why would a host dissipate their tulpa?
This is a good question. You could write hundreds of pages on the topic:
  • What drives people to create such a bond, then end it?
  • Do they understand what they’re getting into when they make a tulpa?
  • What type of person is more likely to dissipate their tulpa?
  • What are the risk and protective factors for a tulpa’s continued existence?
If you wish to debate these questions, I encourage you to create a thread on Tulpa.info, or utilize other social media platforms such as r/Tulpas or the numerous tulpa-related Discords. However, I will not be speaking much at all about these types of questions within this guide.

none of those questions seem related to your guide, and you only bring them up to say that you aren't going to talk about them, so why bring it up it the first place? this section is unnecessary and should be removed.

Quote:The host’s situation may resemble any of the following:
  • They have made little progress with their tulpa: the tulpa is not sentient, is minimally vocal, and is devoid of any “spark of life.” In short, they have decided to give up with the tulpa creation process. They may have been trying for weeks, months, or even longer.
  • They are not devoted to their tulpa. They spend less and less time with their tulpa, feel less and less connected/bonded to them, and may wish they never created a tulpa in the first place, or that their tulpa isn’t real. A host in this situation may also already have another tulpa or tulpas.
  • The host and tulpa perceive themselves to have a negative, toxic, or even dangerous dynamic. Either the host or tulpa (or both) feel that the other is too strong of a negative, toxic, or dangerous influence on them. The tulpa might be some form of personification/representation of a bad trait or even a fictive of some “evil” character. Violence or other negative/unethical/hurtful acts may be involved, and the host may fear for their sanity. They want to be free from each other.
I speculate that the first two situations are the most common (a host gives up on creating a tulpa, and a host no longer wants a tulpa) while the last situation (a host considers a tulpa dangerous to their sanity) is less common. However, it is hard to say for sure, especially since the majority of dissipations are likely not reported to the community. 

this section would be especially helpful for those who are considering dissipation to let them know that they aren't alone, or if they aren't in one of these situations (like if their problem(s) are more temporary) it may make them reconsider if they should attempt dissipation. my fellow GAT members have picked on the last reason that you wrote, but since that is a thing that actually happens (I myself had a tulpa that I had to dissipate for that reason (before I heard about tulpas)), it makes sense for it to be there for the same reason that the other reasons are there, and it would probably be detrimental even to systems with toxic tulpas reading this guide to see the reasons list not include their situation because then they might think that they are the only one who has ever had to go through that.
your speculation, however, does not add much and could be removed without losing anything.

Quote:
How to Dissipate a Tulpa: What is Dissipation? Is it Permanent?

this section is good except for all the times you made up percentages. I would also argue that tulpas never act without the fronters attention, but rather that developed are able to gain the fronters attention without the fronter willing it, but that's not very important to the guide anyway.

Quote:In addition to having dissipated myself at the urging of my host, I have also dissipated two thoughtforms. One was vocal and sentient, though markedly less than myself. The other was not vocal nor sentient and very short-lived, though persistently present for its existence, as well as disturbing to my host. A lot of what I did was wrong. I have dissipated tulpas carelessly, violently, and cruelly. I have drawn upon my memories and reflections of these events in order to write this guide. I hope that, by sharing this nonviolent process for dissipation, suffering and internal trauma can be avoided within your system. I hope that you can benefit from what I have learned. 

this seems like it belongs in the preface

this guide overall does a very good job at handling the sensetive subject of dissipation in a way that will minimize harm to all those involved. the small headers do look very odd though.

will approve once you remove the part about the questions that you didn't address and the made up percentages
I have a tulpa named Miela (formerly known as Monika) who I love very much.


"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"
-Me
Reply

Sponsors:
Lolflash - click it, you know you want to

#12
Dissipation is a difficult subject, but as mentioned by others it is better to provide people with information than to leave them in a situation where they may take more violent measures, or to be left without a sense of closure. Dissipation should be a last resort, but people will do it whether there's guidance or not. 

Quote:The host and tulpa perceive themselves to have a negative, toxic, or even dangerous dynamic. Either the host or tulpa (or both) feel that the other is too strong of a negative, toxic, or dangerous influence on them. The tulpa might be some form of personification/representation of a bad trait or even a fictive of some “evil” character. Violence or other negative/unethical/hurtful acts may be involved, and the host may fear for their sanity.
A tulpa being based on an evil character isn't a problem in itself. Tulpas are people, not representations of negative traits or a true duplicate of an evil fictional (or factual) character. I feel most tulpas who display negative hostile traits can overcome them as they develop, or be guided by a responsible host or friend towards better, more cooperative behaviour. Especially if they are still developing and not set in their ways.  There's another issue that hasn't been mentioned in this guide, and that is intrusive thoughts. If the host believes their tulpa is hostile or being a negative influence, they should make sure that they aren't misattributing negative intrusive thoughts to the tulpa, or that there isn't some other misunderstanding. I would hate for any tulpa to be dissipated over some misunderstanding, and some hosts just aren't familiar with these issues.

Quote:Dissipation is the termination, the death, of your relationship with your tulpa, and by extension, the death of your tulpa. After a tulpa is dissipated, they are not considered to presently exist or to be alive.
The guide repeats that a dissipated tulpa will be dead, but also that they can be brought back. If they can be brought back, they haven't actually died. I feel it's more accurate to explain that they are gone or dormant, like a memory that's not being accessed. The definition you give here is fine: "Dissipation could also be defined as a state of permanent, total mental inactivity, such that you no longer have an active relationship with your tulpa." Except, it's only permanent if the tulpa is never brought back. Dormancy, stasis, dissipation, it's just a sliding scale of how inactive the tulpa is (temporary, long-term, or effectively permanent). Often when a host has neglected their tulpa for a long time (even years), they are reassured that they can bring them back. So to say the tulpa dies or is permanently gone, is inaccurate.

Quote:So long as that 0.01% of the tulpa is left in the brain
We can't say with certainty anything about percentages. Presumably the neural connections for the tulpa are still there, they're just not being activated. Subjectively the tulpa will be absent.

Quote:Having a tulpa is a bit like (though not exactly like) being married. If you are married to someone, you can divorce them. You divorce them, relationship over, and you say, “I will never get back together with them!”
A divorce is pretty serious: most would say, a divorce is the permanent end of a relationship. Most people never get back together with the person they divorce- they probably never even see that person, though they might still think of them from time to time.

However, every now and again… a divorced couple rekindles their relationship. They get remarried.
I think this example is a little unnecessary, I think the point was already clear. 

Quote:“I realize now that it was a mistake for me to create you as someone who only insults me and is aggressive toward me. I know you’re not happy here, and so I’ve decided that you no longer need to be here. We’re not going to talk anymore.” 
I find this example strange. "It was a mistake for me to create you." "I've decided you aren't happy." "I've decided I don't need you to be here." (I'm paraphrasing here) I can't think of a scenario where these are reasonable things to say as a peaceful goodbye. It also makes it sounds like the host intentionally made the tulpa aggressive, rather than that they turned out aggressive through other ways. I would recommend replacing this example or removing it.

Formatting and grammar notes:

Quote:
The section headings are very small, and sometimes they are in bold, sometimes not. The heading "Humane" is left in normal font size. Please make sure the formatting is consistent. I would prefer if the headings were normal size or slightly larger. 

Quote:It is cruel/immoral/evil to dissipate a tulpa- you shouldn’t do it

they do not react in any way- they are dead.

such that you no longer have an active relationship with your tulpa- they are considered dead.

Most people never get back together with the person they divorce- they probably never even see that person
These hyphens should be replaced with a dash (you can copy-paste this — if you can't type it).

Quote: Prepare yourself for the loss of this.
This wording sounds awkward. I suggest "Prepare yourself for this loss," or "Prepare yourself for the loss of this companionship."

Quote:I recommend this event happens in a quiet place
Here "happens" should be "happen." 

Overall, the guide is good. With some changes mentioned in my review and others, I will approve. In particular, I would like to see the issue of intrusive thoughts explained, as it can be a common and confusing problem for hosts.
My tulpa Aya writes in this color.
Reply
#13
I thought this guide was good except for two things.

Quote:They have made little progress with their tulpa: the tulpa is not sentient, is minimally vocal, and is devoid of any “spark of life.” In short, they have decided to give up with the tulpa creation process. They may have been trying for weeks, months, or even longer.

if it has no spark of life and no sentience.. why focus on it to say goodbye (in doing so you may end up giving something which had no awareness, awareness as you are saying a probably emotional goodbye to it). It probably would be better just leaving it and not thinking about it any more.

Quote: “I realize now that it was a mistake for me to create you as someone who only insults me and is aggressive toward me. I know you’re not happy here, and so I’ve decided that you no longer need to be here. We’re not going to talk anymore.”

this is the equivalent to saying to a child "I made a mistake by getting pregnant with you and I have decided that I no longer want you here and are not going to talk to you no more" how is that nice? If one had a nasty tulpa that statement would only make it act out more. I can not see how saying this could be at all helpful.

If you need to convince yourself on why you need to do that, do so but I do think it's best not saying that to the tulpa.
Jesse (human male) DOB 16th April 2013
Working on imposition
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Sponsors:
Lolflash - click it, you know you want to