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Spoke to Psychiatrist today
#1
I saw my Psychiatrist today and told her about Tulpas. She was absolutely amazed and interested. She thought it was a fantastic and fascinating concept. I told her about Servitors and other thought form stuff.. She really liked the concept.

She thought it was a healthy thing for a schizophrenic to do because it allows you to design your voice to be a friendly voice to help take you away from the negative voices.
Don't believe the things I say just because I tell you.. Test these things and prove them to yourselves so that you know them to be true. ~The Buddha
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#2
HOLY SHIT! That is amazing! Huh. Next thing you know, there will be the "Make a Tulpa Therapy" being written about in psychological science journals.
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#3
The optimistic view: Tulpas are a good way to practice making your hallucinations more friendly, or to use the power of placebo/thought to fight the negative ones.
Pessimistic view: Tulpas are encouraging hallucinations, and someone not mentally sound is more susceptible to creating an "evil tulpa" due to their inability to control their thoughts/imagination.

Unfortunately, there is no right answer. Some people really shouldn't do anything tulpa-related and are best off avoiding activities that may encourage stressful imaginative thoughts (how do I describe the effects of schizophrenia?), or becoming any more attached to them. And I'm sure many can learn to take control of those negative thoughts in this way, whether by having their tulpa/thoughtform do it for them or by gaining experience working with them through creating their tulpa, or at least being comforted by them. Certainly we've seen both sides. So it's a case-by-case basis.

I recommend tulpas to those who have a decent amount of control over their imagination and thoughts. Not necessarily that you can keep yourself from feeling bad as in the case of depression, but that you can tell the difference between mental and reality, and that a dark entity in your mind can't physically hurt you.

Those who can't, I can't. I've seen cases where someone makes a tulpa to help fight their other hallucinations and it works for a while, but then their tulpa dies/turns evil/whatever and causes more pain, and it's obvious it was all just an imaginative drama they're unable to distinguish from reality. Though many in this forum call those people roleplayers, it's not roleplaying when the person is actually caused harm, it's mental disorder. And maybe a mental disorder.

Otherwise, if you're well able to distinguish imagination from reality, then sure, I recommend creating a tulpa if you'd like to or think it'd help.
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
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#4
(07-24-2015, 10:18 PM)Mistgod Wrote: HOLY SHIT! That is amazing! Huh. Next thing you know, there will be the "Make a Tulpa Therapy" being written about in psychological science journals.

Well, actually, back in the seventies tulpas were for a short time promoted by some psychologists as a method of personal development. That's where Kevin learned, and how his first tulpa (kerin) was created.


See also Dr Samuel Veissière's initial study and his final paper on the subject. (I can provide further references if you want.)
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#5
I think it's great that psychiatrists are seeing the value of this. It's a lot like what Jung did, after all.

That being said, what Reisen said is worth repeating.

(07-24-2015, 10:32 PM)Reisen Wrote: I've seen cases where someone makes a tulpa to help fight their other hallucinations and it works for a while, but then their tulpa dies/turns evil/whatever and causes more pain, and it's obvious it was all just an imaginative drama they're unable to distinguish from reality. Though many in this forum call those people roleplayers, it's not roleplaying when the person is actually caused harm, it's mental disorder. And maybe a mental disorder.
"Some things have to be believed to be seen." - Ralph Hodgson
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#6
(07-24-2015, 10:32 PM)Reisen Wrote: Those who can't, I can't. I've seen cases where someone makes a tulpa to help fight their other hallucinations and it works for a while, but then their tulpa dies/turns evil/whatever and causes more pain, and it's obvious it was all just an imaginative drama they're unable to distinguish from reality. Though many in this forum call those people roleplayers, it's not roleplaying when the person is actually caused harm, it's mental disorder. And maybe a mental disorder.

Otherwise, if you're well able to distinguish imagination from reality, then sure, I recommend creating a tulpa if you'd like to or think it'd help.

I have had Schizophrenia for 23 years. I got a good handle on it and can tell the diff between reality and illusion.. I even got a good system that I use to help me deal with it. I'm curious about how you mentioned how Schizo Tulpas Die or turn evil do you have any good stories about such experiences? Like Details about what these people went thru? I would really be interested in reading about them.
Don't believe the things I say just because I tell you.. Test these things and prove them to yourselves so that you know them to be true. ~The Buddha
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#7
"Good" stories? Uh... no not really? The people I'm talking about made tulpa(s) supposedly, but then said oh my tulpa was killed by the darkness in my mind and it made me watch as he was tortured to death etc.etc.etc. Or one person on this forum a long time ago (don't remember any details sorry) had a massive roleplay in a progress report with like 13 different tulpas. All I remember is at some point they left and came back and had a child, one of them was killed by another and then their child was kidnapped by the rebelling - well, you get the picture.

It certainly appeared to be roleplaying, and that's why no one replied to the thread the entire 30+ posts or whatever she made. I don't remember any details that are searchable though, so you'll have to take my word for it.

Anyways, it's not that schizophrenic's tulpas will die or turn evil or whatever. It's that they can't control their imagination, and what mentally sound people consider invasive thoughts turns into waking nightmares for those who can't distinguish reality from the imagined. That person really believed what was happening in their head, that their tulpa husband was killed and their tulpa child was kidnapped by their other tulpas who wanted her dead. If you don't have that problem.. You shouldn't have that problem. Like I said, everyone's different and should make a decision for themselves. The people who shouldn't are those in danger of letting their imaginations hurt them.
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
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#8
I'll back Reisen up on that story. I think I know who he's talking about, but I won't link to her PR because she's still somewhat active (posts within the last month), and she has problems enough of her own without the community treating her like a freak show.
"Some things have to be believed to be seen." - Ralph Hodgson
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