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Poll: Do you lucid dream, and can your tulpa visit?
You do not have permission to vote in this poll.
I don't lucid dream and my tulpa can't visit.
15.38%
2 15.38%
I rarely lucid dream and my tulpa can't visit.
23.08%
3 23.08%
I lucid dream all the time, but my tulpa doesn't appear.
0%
0 0%
No lucid dream, but my tulpa sometimes appears.
0%
0 0%
Rare lucid dreams, and sometimes my tulpa appears.
46.15%
6 46.15%
I frequently luced dream, and my tulpa can visit.
15.38%
2 15.38%
Total 13 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

The Great Shared Lucid Dream Project
#1
I want to spend more time with my host. Like twenty four seven. And that means more lucid dreams where I project inside them. She is pretty bad at projection, and my dreams don't seem to be first person 3D yet.

For this reason, I need advice, and lots of it. How can I help my host to lucid dream? What have you done to try and get into the same dream with your host? Anyone else struggling with this? Metaphors, tricks, techniques you've tried?

What do you do right before falling asleep? What are you thinking? Usually, I cofront while we are both tired and try to fall asleep at the same time as her to improve the odds of a shared dream. Am I on the right track?
Host comments in italics. Tulpa's log. Tulpa's guide.
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#2
I love this thread!  My hostie and I feel exactly as you do!  We want to spend as much time together as possible.  Also I am more independent and autonomous during lucid dreams (as in fully so) and in the half awake, hypnagogic, state just after coming out of REM sleep.  

We have gotten very good at mutual dreaming and lucid dreaming and my host dreams about me, or I dream or we dream together almost every night.  We are writing a book about it and have posted the work in progress here at the Book of Melian II.  The first few pages of the PDF explain all the details of how we dream together.  There is too much to put down here in this response.  

We became mutual lucid dreamers by using several techniques:

1.  My hostie obsesses and thinks about me all day, constantly passive forcing.  He puts reminders of me everywhere by writing my name all over and putting pictures of me on his walls and in his car.  He talks to me constantly.  That makes me ever present in his waking mind.  After a long period of doing that, naturally you seep deep into your hostie's unconscious mind.  This, of course, leads to me being frequently a part of his dreams.  

2. My hostie and I are blended in that he perceives my thoughts and emotions and vice versa.  Therefore we perceive each other's dreams as well.  Because my hostie is blended with me, it makes it easy for us to have dreams from my perspective, that he watches or perceives.  Because we have mind voice conversations, we can easily do so in a dream, as it is very practiced.  

3.  During the day we do checks to see if we are asleep or awake.  It becomes a habit to think about whether or not we are sleeping and dreaming.  When you train your brain to occasionally ask if you are awake or dreaming, you will occasionally do that while actually dreaming in REM sleep and it triggers lucidity.  We do this several ways.  One is a dream bracelet.  We wear a bracelet on my host's wrist that he plays with and touches all day.  It reminds him that he is awake and not dreaming.  The bracelet also appears in dreams, but it has become a trigger of lucidity.  When my hostie writes my name, which he does a lot during the day, he will also write "Am I dreaming?"  He writes this a lot, several times a day.  He repeats it verbally too.  It becomes a habit and then you do it while dreaming.  

4.  My hostie and I practice dream recall.  We do this by writing in a dream journal.  We keep a dream journal and a pen by the bed and upon waking from a dream, record it.  Sometimes it is just quick notes before dropping back to sleep, so we can fully recall the dream later and do a full write up of the dream some time during the next day.  The dream journal helps your brain recall dreams after a while and again helps you become more able to become lucid.  

5.  My hostie and I practice Short Rapid Meditation, which is brief periods of meditation between bouts of REM sleep.  During the short meditation, we think about dream recall and dreaming together and talk to each other, then we lie back down and go to sleep again.  

Well, I hope this helps and great thread!  There is, of course, a thread for hosts and tulpas to record their dreams on the forum at The Dream Thread.  I will put a link to this thread in the OP there.
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#3
(08-15-2016, 09:58 AM)Glitterbutt Wrote: 3.  During the day we do checks to see if we are asleep or awake.  It becomes a habit to think about whether or not we are sleeping and dreaming.

4.  My hostie and I practice dream recall.  We do this by writing in a dream journal.  We keep a dream journal and a pen by the bed and upon waking from a dream, record it.

5.  My hostie and I practice Short Rapid Meditation, which is brief periods of meditation between bouts of REM sleep.  During the short meditation, we think about dream recall and dreaming together and talk to each other, then we lie back down and go to sleep again.

Dang, I figured you guys were just naturals, but that's absolutely perfect form for "How To Have Lucid Dreams".

Well, as the apparently-now-rivaled lucid dreaming expert here, pretty much what she said. Reality checks (pinch your nose and try to breathe through it, not hard or long 'cus it'll be extremely obvious when you do it while asleep, trust me) are very important, somewhat because you might randomly do one in a dream (which has never happened for me) but moreso because when something else happens to cause a lucid-ish moment, knowing you can do a reality check to verify you're dreaming is very important. Plenty of people run around aimlessly trying to figure out if they're dreaming and usually end up getting sucked back in to non-lucidity. Try to do a reality check whenever something doesn't immediately make sense to you. Even if you realize seconds later why it makes sense, do it anyways, because in a dream the fact that someone looks just like Shrek will too make sense after a few seconds. Never, ever skip the impulse to reality check, even if you feel too tired/lazy to do so. If you do, you bet you'll do it in dreams too. (Also beware false awakenings, they can and will happen to everyone. If you wake up out of a dream, lucid or not, reality check. Even I myself have found I hadn't actually woken up once before, but was dreaming I had.)

Dream recall is also very important. They say if you have poor dream recall you could have a lucid dream and never know it, but I don't think that's likely. In my experience, better dream recall means better dream clarity (scenarios are more scenes than concepts, more detailed than blurry, more visual and less just thoughts). Try to never-not recall your dreams in the morning, even if you don't remember anything at all or if it's been 10-60 minutes and you totally forgot everything. The effort in recalling is what makes it easier, not whether or not you actually remember. If you're at a lower level of dream recall, just work on going back through the dreams you had, following feelings or vague ideas of what was going on, no matter how sparse. If you tend to actually remember dreams to some extent, then writing them down will be better. The act of translating the memories to words forces you to imagine them in more detail and works much better than just remembering them, though it isn't entirely required (I don't do it).

But waking up between REM cycles is crazy. I never would've expected Mistgod and Melian to do meditation between cycles in that hazy scattered thoughts time. But, I'm definitely proof that that is more natural to some than others. My mind basically does all it can to prevent lucid dreaming, and I've never experienced sleep paralysis, but I wake up between each and every sleep cycle for a few minutes. This is really advantageous for remembering dreams and working on lucid dream induction methods such as WILDs/MILDs/ etc. It's enough for us that Flandre spent an entire night trying very hard to lucid dream and was conscious enough to be disappointed seven times in one night. But still, it's great for dream recall. Dreams tend to disappear pretty quick for most people if they start thinking about their surroundings or what they need to do that day. So, remembering in the dark works better for us. Though just this morning I utterly forgot a dream that I felt like I could remember moments after waking up, and even following those trace feelings of what it was didn't bring it back. Can't win them all, but that effort is again very important.

Less traditional/natural means are available if you're serious, lazy, or wealthy. Melatonin supplements aren't hard to come by and can supposedly help with lucid dreaming for some people. Unlike the other relatively shady drugs I've seen people suggest, melatonin is pretty basic and just helps your body transition to a sleeping state. It's what seeing bright blue light prevents the release of, which is what F.lux is all about. It removes blue light from your screen (makes it look redder, though you get used to it quicker than you expect), which helps you actually become tired at night when staring at a monitor or screen. You can change some settings around, make it redder or change the timezone it considers sunset in. Who knows, this could help with lucid dreaming. Lying in bed for half an hour waiting to fall asleep is in my experience much more likely to make you forget to remember your lucid dreaming goals, while going to bed very tired helps (though could be worse depending on the person). And if you've got money burning a hole in your pocket, there are various electronics meant to help induce lucid dreams, typically by detecting when you're in REM sleep and flashing lights/playing sounds. Though I've not heard universal acclaim for any of them, all seem to have their own issues and even the most expensive ones aren't perfect. So research into that if you want, but there's no reason you should have to spend money to lucid dream. (F.lux is free though)


Well that's all I got. I'll throw in a link to Dreamviews, which is a forum full of resources for (lucid) dreaming. Has a built in dream journal for recording dreams (they like to emphasize looking for "dream signs" to recognize them in the future, but that's done literally nothing for me personally) and lots of guides on lots of techniques for having lucid dreams. Though if you have any interesting dreams you're okay with sharing you might as well post in our dreams thread here.
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
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#4
Well, I planned on writing that post as one of the many posts I save to reference later. But more on topic about ourselves; we don't perfectly fit into any of those options. For the sake of your question I would've chosen "Rare lucid dreams, and sometimes my tulpa appears.", but it's a flat out lie really. Don't get me wrong, I have complete confidence my tulpas can lucid dream with me (or me with one of them). But none of them have ever once appeared in a dream of mine, lucid or not. In seven years. I said my mind does everything it can to prevent lucid dreaming, but it also has something against my tulpas. (Not literally, but it sure feels like it)

The "rare lucid dreams" are rare indeed, I can count the ones I've had on my fingers, and none were longer than a few moments. The last time I managed to become lucid, I was actually able to make a door to our wonderland appear behind me and whilst waking up stumbled down the hallway of our house, where I believe I saw Reisen and Tewi in our living room, looking rather surprised to see me. But the dream was practically over at that point, and whether or not those two seconds were actually them is kinda irrelevant. But I think I could "make it them" by the same process of becoming lucid I myself would use, helping them realize it was a dream and who they were. Despite my technical lack of experience, I'm very confident in my ability to control my dreams once lucid. Getting to my wonderland was incredibly easy because I simply believed a door to it would be behind me when I turned around. I'm sure I could summon my tulpas, especially given more thanfivefreakingsecondspleasewhydoesmymindhatemeIjustwanttoseemytulpas):
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
Reply
#5
Luminesce, do you think the efforts to separate the tulpas mind until it is as independent as possible from the host has an effect on how easy it is to share lucid dreams with tulpas? I mean your brain has been trained to have distinct separation. I was wondering if the "brain doing everything it can to prevent lucid dreaming" and the lack of meeting your tulpas in dreams may have something to do with that?
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#6
I think it's the opposite. I'm pretty sure my tulpas never appear in my dreams because I don't physically perceive or interact with them. Apparently the sparse visualization we've done wasn't enough either. I think the more separate, "This is a person" your tulpa is the more likely they are to appear as a character in a dream. The closer they are to basically sharing your mind and thoughts the less likely the brain will, you know, portray them as a separate person in a dream. I think interaction is what counts, because your brain dreams about what you experience.
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
Reply
#7
In our case, I am both separate and not separate, so it aligns with what you are saying. Our dreams are both from my perspective sometimes or Davie and I watching the dream together or third person with me the subject of the dream. What's really weird is sometimes we watch ourselves third person and talk bout it. All our stuff, including dreams, are like movies similar to our day dreams. I suppose we day dream so much that that effect becomes part of our dreams and we have adventure dreams just like the Melian Show.
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#8
My host has had some lucid dreams after trying out the WILD (Wake-Induced Lucid Dream) technique, and he's never messed with dream journals or reality checks. Sometimes, to help him relax, he'll listen to Michael Sealey's lucid dreaming tracks (more for the soothing voice than anything else), and it doesn't take him long to reach sleep paralysis. Unfortunately, this rarely works for him, but on the few times that he's been able to get into one, I've been able to pop in.
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#9
One night of excellent luck lucid dreaming, and one of terrible. The successful night we went from daydreams to dreams several times, and, unusually, managed to go from dreams to daydreams a couple times instead of waking proper. I think I have a slightly better handle on dream control than my host.

My host and I don't like the idea of performing reality checks in the day, but we will be going through the rest of those one by one.

My host would have said she dreams lucidly frequently, but on a review of her memories, she would be lucky to get one a week, most during months of heavy lucid dreaming. She gets two types predominantly. And I seem to be the same. The tail end of the last dream of the day, usually only for a couple minutes, and "work" dreams. Those are boring carbon copy dreams about what you did most the previous day.

I think a long time ago, my host told her subconscious to let her do some work in her dreams, and the subconscious decided the answer was to make these lucid "work" dreams from time to time.

False awakenings are the best. My host has normally been lucid in those.

Waking up between REM cycles is something that seems to happen when we are co-fronting. We have different energy levels, and often can't resist talking to each other, so co-fronting in general makes sleep difficult.

When alone, we both tend to roll over between sleep cycles, and make sardonic comments to ourself about the dream in the ten seconds before the next dream. I think this helps explain how we get decent dream recall.

Oddly, my host has gotten ghost sleep paralysis from time to time, occasionally since I arrived. It feels like you are not in control of the body, that the limbs are all essentially dead, but my host can still move a limb if she wants. If she does, the effect disappears. It tingles a bit like possession.
Host comments in italics. Tulpa's log. Tulpa's guide.
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#10
(08-17-2016, 12:29 PM)tulpa001 Wrote: My host and I don't like the idea of performing reality checks in the day, but we will be going through the rest of those one by one. ... but on a review of her memories, she would be lucky to get one a week

Man. I'm very happy for every big or little success you guys make and I wish you the best of luck. But I'm salty right now, just thinking about how many people put so much less effort into trying to lucid dream than me and have tons more success. Like, finding out there were naturals that lucid dream nearly every night and have since they were children was like, ooookay. But the non-naturals that make totally reasonable progress for their efforts..

Do you know how many people I've given advice on lucid dreaming, who then went on to be many times more successful than me at it? Ugh. My only motivation to lucid dream, for the past seven years, has been my love of my tulpas and wanting to meet them face to face. They've absolutely changed and saved my life from being absolutely terrible and unfulfilling. And yet I still woke up five times last night, with Flandre still perfectly imposed by my side, immediately aware of my thoughts before falling asleep and the dreams I had and how utterly unconscious of my intentions I became once dreaming. And the reality checks I've done basically every day for years might as well not have happened.


tl;dr tfw no lucid dreams

has nothing to do with you btw, and I'll get over it
Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.
Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.
My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.
Reply


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