Tulpas and Brain Damage
#1
Simple question to discuss, how do you think damage to the brain would affect a tulpa, like getting hit on the head hard or developing some kind of mental illness?
Name: Rose
Birth: 9/9/11

Form: Human, brown long hair, blue eyes.

Working on: Visualization and Sentience

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#2
Mental illnesses don't do so much to them, but physical brain damage could be another story.
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#3
It would depend a whole lot on what part of the brain got damaged. If the brain damage caused memory loss (I'm not talking about simple amnesia where memories may eventually be triggered to return, but actual permanent damage to the hipppocampus that destroys or severely impairs someone's ability to store and retrieve memories), then... well, a tulpa probably wouldn't die as a result of that, but it seems likely the host would just completely forget they had a tulpa and therefore just stop forcing. That would probably result in a developed tulpa remaining alive but suffering from the same memory problems as the host. That does raise an interesting question, though - if a tulpa is forgotten by both the host and itself, will it continue to exist anyway, or will its inability to remember itself prevent it from being able to sustain itself and cause it to dissipate?

If the brain damage impairs sensory processing, I'm not quite sure what would happen. Would that make the host unable to visualize/hear mindvoice/etc? Would the tulpa lose the sense the host has lost? I'm not sure there, but it's interesting to think about.

Damage to the prefrontal cortex could potentially have devastating effects to both the host and tulpa if the damage is severe enough, as it would be to the part of the brain responsible for higher thought processes. The effects, of course, would vary greatly depending on the location of the damage and how specific/generalized the damage is (as well as how severe it is, of course). I doubt it would be fatal to a tulpa, though it could definitely cause some huge impairments for both host and tulpa.

Damage to the brain stem could easily be fatal for both host and tulpa, as the brain stem is responsible for controlling the vital functions.

If the corpus callosum, the bundle of nerve fibers connecting the two hemispheres of the brain, was cut - something which is extremely unlikely to happen as a result of brain trauma but was once used as a treatment for severe epilepsy before better alternatives became available - now that's something I'd be interested in seeing the effects it would have on a tulpa and their host. The details of just what happens as a result of the corpus callosum being cut would take awhile to explain here, so do a search on split-brain patients to get an idea of its effects. Basically, though, cutting off communication between the brain's hemispheres results in some WEIRD effects.

Finally, mental illness, which I'm only bringing up because you mentioned it. Mental illness has nothing to do with brain damage. Having a mental illness does not physically damage your brain, and being brain damaged is not going to give you a mental illness.
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#4
Thanks for the reply, another question. If the host went deaf or blind, would the host still be able to hear or see the tulpa?
Name: Rose
Birth: 9/9/11

Form: Human, brown long hair, blue eyes.

Working on: Visualization and Sentience

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#5
Yeah, sure, since hearing/seeing an imposed tulpa is not actual sensory information.
"If this can be avoided, it should. If it can't, then it would be better if it could be. If it happened and you're thinking back to it, try and think back further. Try not to avoid it with your mind. If any of this is possible, it may be helpful. If not, it won't be."
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#6
I actually remember a story of a blind guy who coped with not being able to see anymore by imposing everything. Like he imposed his wife and stuff. I seem to remember the wife saying that his vision of her wasn't accurate, but it was ok because it was the way that he wanted to see her.

I imagine deaf people could do the same.
"Some things have to be believed to be seen." - Ralph Hodgson
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#7
Not that I wish this on anyone, but I would be interested in seeing what would happen to a tulpa after a stroke. I mean, depending on what part of the brain the stroke occurs, some personality and behavioral changes can occur, making a person more prone to anger and frustration, or maybe joy and awe, etc. It would make sense that a tulpa would have a similar shift, but this would need to be verified before actually coming to that conclusion. I think all of us on this forum can agree that the human mind is way more powerful than any of us were raised to believe, and we may just be surprised by the results.

A great non-tulpa story on this is of Jill Bolte Taylor, a neuroscientist that lost a large portion of her brain that deals with logic and problem solving.
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