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[Visualization] Need help keeping visualization stable.
#1
I've just started making my Tulpa Iris and. I'm having trouble keeping my visualization of Iris . I can visualize her decently but Whenever I try to picture her besides being next to me in the real world my perspective will either change and rotate and I'll leave where I am in the wonderland or my mental image of Iris will will warp and rotate at random. Also sometimes random images will just flood my mind.

Like I can picture iris in the wonderland with me just as an observer like as if I was watching them on a TV. And I have even more success picturing myself in my wonderland even from first person. But when I try to put us both in it gets incredibly hard to make us both stable. Without my visualization warping or "glitching out".

I don't have much of a problem picturing them next to or behind me when I passive force though.

Are there any exercises I can do to keep my visualizations more stable. Most of the ones I see are for increasing detail and I've got an acceptable level of detail for now.
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#2
I generally have trouble visualizing too, but a lot of it has to do with my ability to focus.

If my focus sucks in general, I can't always get away with simply talking to my tulpa Ranger without getting distracted. If this is something you struggle with, Ranger figured out that creating a conversation out of whatever came up helped keep him feel more "stable". It didn't always work though, and sometimes you are better off taking a break or trying again later.

Due to bad focus, sometimes my visualization is garbage and I and up with a "black void" or blurry, glitchy, and inconsistent images. If you feel like this, you can try visualizing something off topic to "warm up" your brain. That way, it may be easier to then visualize and focus on Iris.

When struggling with the "black out" problem, sometimes a different mindset alone can help. When looking at Ranger, he may face the "camera" and then play with the "settings" to try and re-focus the image. How this works is less important; the goal is to imagine the re-adjusting of the "mind cam". Another time I had this issue, one of my other characters suddenly started holding a torch. This was clever because my brain didn't have to put in as much color or shape detail and had an excuse to "under perform". Again, these methods are not perfect and like I said earlier, it could just be a bad day.

If your "mind cam" is shifty or unstable, then focus on a single simple object like a cube or a sphere and focus on trying to make the setting still. If multiple objects are a problem, start with a cube or sphere and add more complicated objects to visualize. (Warning: If you lose track of what's where, that's a memory problem, not a visualization one. Also, don't feel forced to object spam your wonderland either. We're not savants or anything.)

There is no "correct" way to visualize your setting or your Tulpa. I only visualize Ranger and I together when we are both in the wonderland. I do this by taking a 3rd person observer view most of the time, but sometimes I switch to 1st person or usually just do a close up shot to get a more detailed image of whoever the focus is. Otherwise, I just focus on Ranger (usually in a void, but sometimes he changes the void to create a scene he wants to use). I find the "micro wonderland" very useful when forcing passively.

Feel free to play around with different angles too. If you benefit from the observer position, then don't feel bad using it. You can also try top-down, ground-up, tossing the "mind cam" on the floor, drone cam, etc. The more angles you play with, the more you will learn about which ones you like and which are useful when.
My Wonderland form minus the glasses and the fur. I'm not a hippo, I promise.
I sometimes speak in pink and Ranger sometimes speaks in blue (if it's unmarked and colored assume it's Ranger). He loves to chat.

My other Tulpas have their own account now.
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#3
(09-26-2018, 07:53 PM)Cat_ShadowGriffin Wrote: I generally have trouble visualizing too, but a lot of it has to do with my ability to focus.

If my focus sucks in general, I can't always get away with simply talking to my tulpa Ranger without getting distracted. If this is something you struggle with, Ranger figured out that creating a conversation out of whatever came up helped keep him feel more "stable". It didn't always work though, and sometimes you are better off taking a break or trying again later.

Due to bad focus, sometimes my visualization is garbage and I and up with a "black void" or blurry, glitchy, and inconsistent images. If you feel like this, you can try visualizing something off topic to "warm up" your brain. That way, it may be easier to then visualize and focus on Iris.

When struggling with the "black out" problem, sometimes a different mindset alone can help. When looking at Ranger, he may face the "camera" and then play with the "settings" to try and re-focus the image. How this works is less important; the goal is to imagine the re-adjusting of the "mind cam". Another time I had this issue, one of my other characters suddenly started holding a torch. This was clever because my brain didn't have to put in as much color or shape detail and had an excuse to "under perform". Again, these methods are not perfect and like I said earlier, it could just be a bad day.

If your "mind cam" is shifty or unstable, then focus on a single simple object like a cube or a sphere and focus on trying to make the setting still. If multiple objects are a problem, start with a cube or sphere and add more complicated objects to visualize. (Warning: If you lose track of what's where, that's a memory problem, not a visualization one. Also, don't feel forced to object spam your wonderland either. We're not savants or anything.)

There is no "correct" way to visualize your setting or your Tulpa. I only visualize Ranger and I together when we are both in the wonderland. I do this by taking a 3rd person observer view most of the time, but sometimes I switch to 1st person or usually just do a close up shot to get a more detailed image of whoever the focus is. Otherwise, I just focus on Ranger (usually in a void, but sometimes he changes the void to create a scene he wants to use). I find the "micro wonderland" very useful when forcing passively.

Feel free to play around with different angles too. If you benefit from the observer position, then don't feel bad using it. You can also try top-down, ground-up, tossing the "mind cam" on the floor, drone cam, etc. The more angles you play with, the more you will learn about which ones you like and which are useful when.

Thx. I'll definitely try your advice.
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#4
I am beginning to realize this is a common problem for tulpamancers. Unfortunately some tulpamancers give up on it and concentrate on other things. I say unfortunately because we do a majority of our forcing in wonderland, even when we just talk, they're sitting on the couch, and our experiences are as vivid and fulfilling as any lucid dream has ever been.

I naively thought everyone was like us, but now i see where i may play a small role in helping others who want this experience. Determining how to do this is an obstacle though.

Many of the guides go through this and some assume the learner can actually do it proficiently. Hence my confusion.

If you or anyone else want to spend some time with us in discord, we may be able to walk through some exercises and compare to see if there is any way we can help. I don't think anyone should have an obstacle to this other than practice.

Also, stray images definately plague us at times, call them intrusive thoughts. The oddest thing about these thoughts is that for us they are unique to our interactions. They do not happen when i visualize while writing or otherwise daydreaming. They also only happen when we talk in the wonderland home, not when we go on adventures.

As far as quality of experience, i have to say our wonderland is vivid, but it does not have to be to have fun. Also, as i have said before, memories of my experiances with my tulpas are as real as any in the real world, and this is not true for common daydreams. I have heard that the tulpas carry a weight that normal thoughts or thought forms do not, i think this may be the difference.
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