FigN01

Tulpaforcing Tips: a Compendium

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I've used some methods that aren't enough to warrant a full written guide, but I think are still useful to share. I'm sure I'm not the only one either. Whether it's a beginner-level method or strategies for imposition, post here whatever worked for you that was never addressed in a guide.

 

  • 'Body Sculpting'- physically running the hands over every part of your tulpa's body while imagining the internal organs and musculature. Pausing on particularly important components while maintaining direct, focused energy on them helps a lot. It's a practice I've been doing regularly since I started, and I've found it helps my visualization while giving my tulpa a nice boost of emotional energy through so much physical contact.
  • Don't focus on the upper left corner of your vision during wonderland forcing. That's where your eyes move for your mind to access visual imagery and memories, and will lead to intrusive thoughts. Every time something out of place has happened in a closed-eye session, it's because of this phenomenon, and shifting my eye position has been an effective fix.
  • Visualizing two lines of thought in my mind- one belonging to me, and the other to my tulpa. Seeing them as independent circuits of electricity, with the tulpa's manifesting as his body in front of me helps in giving him more autonomy and imposition. *When you think about how your personality is a set of neural connections independent of your tulpa's, feeling them as such inside the mind is beneficial. I relate it to Bluesleeve's essence guide where the mental energy works in tandem with the form in front of you*.
  • For hearing a voice, I've had my tulpa just hum a constant note in my ear. Since speech and it's variety of tones is so complex, listening to a simple note coming from your tulpa should help you to hear a fixed voice. It's so much easier to start out picturing a constant tone than a lot of words and the meanings behind them.
  • Unfocus your eyes in imposition; focus instead on the space your tulpa is occupying as you would if a person was in it. When everything else in your environment is blurred out, your attention will stay in the foreground where you can better picture your tulpa's body. Even reaching out to touch your tulpa starts to feel realistic by doing this.

 

Also, looking at videos of animatronics being put together has been a big help for imposition. It's a lot like imagining anatomy, but the videos have the added benefit of showing those parts working together to make the realistic actions of the whole figure. After this video, my tulpa's blinking and facial expressions became quite a bit more vivid.

[video=youtube]

 

*EDITED in answer to Weird0's question. That's the best I can describe it.

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Those tips are very good. :3

Ive never thought about the left corner thing but since i remember we use this as a gestic to recall memorys, it makes a whole lot of sense.

I also recall one session of sitting on a imaginary beach while daydreaming with my eyes closed, and i was suddently tripping balls while looking in that corner and i wondered about that later.

 

Visualizing two lines of thought in my mind- one belonging to me' date=' and the other to my tulpa. Seeing them as independent circuits of electricity, with the tulpa's manifesting as his body in front of me helps in giving him more autonomy and imposition.[/quote']

 

Can you explain this a little bit more? Is it like you see the room that you're in, in your minds eye and see you with your tulpa as two independent "sparks" in this room. (If you are with your tulpa in a room of course.)

 

Edit: Yeah thanks alot. :)


They say great science is built on the shoulders of giants - not here.

At Tulpa.info we do all our science from scratch; no hand holding.

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Thank you for the tips. I'm not going to start my tulpa for 7 days, since im doing concentration/visual practices.

Hope i can make my wonderland soon.

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  • Visualizing two lines of thought in my mind- one belonging to me, and the other to my tulpa. Seeing them as independent circuits of electricity, with the tulpa's manifesting as his body in front of me helps in giving him more autonomy and imposition. *When you think about how your personality is a set of neural connections independent of your tulpa's, feeling them as such inside the mind is beneficial. I relate it to Bluesleeve's essence guide where the mental energy works in tandem with the form in front of you*.
  • For hearing a voice, I've had my tulpa just hum a constant note in my ear. Since speech and it's variety of tones is so complex, listening to a simple note coming from your tulpa should help you to hear a fixed voice. It's so much easier to start out picturing a constant tone than a lot of words and the meanings behind them.
  • Unfocus your eyes in imposition; focus instead on the space your tulpa is occupying as you would if a person was in it. When everything else in your environment is blurred out, your attention will stay in the foreground where you can better picture your tulpa's body. Even reaching out to touch your tulpa starts to feel realistic by doing this.

 

Imagining (or perhaps perceiving?) the second line of thought in my head gave me feels and head pressure. (Same with the third one, for Eevee, but to a lesser degree.) I didn't visualize anything really, more noticing, acknowledging and focusing on its presence in a nonvisual manner.

 

The humming thing sounds brilliant and I think I'll try it sometime if Lyra's up to humming for long periods.

 

How the heck am I supposed to focus on an empty spot in space? Any time I try to do this, my eyes drift themselves back to the next object in their line of sight. So far as I've heard this is instinctual and all but hardwired. (For me this is more a question of where my eyes converge unless I'm looking at short distances. I'm nearsighted so foreground objects are still in focus when I look at the background.)


Lyra: human female, ~17

Evan: boy, ~14, was an Eevee

Anera: anime-style girl, ~12; Lyra made her

My blog :: Time expectations are bad (forcing time targets are good though)

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How the heck am I supposed to focus on an empty spot in space?

 

I guess I took it for granted that everyone could naturally do this. Well,

 

Have you ever tried to cross your eyes? Just start by looking at your nose with both eyes if you can. If you slowly uncross them from that position, you'll notice that everything else around you remains blurred until your vision is completely in focus. That position in the middle is what you're looking to stay in.

 

Alternatively, you could put your hand a few inches in front of your face and spend just a brief time bringing all the details of it into focus. Then pull it away slowly as you keep fixating on the space it was in. Just pretend your hand was still there. After awhile, you should be able to bring your eyes out of focus like this without the need for any aids.

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This does not work for me. If I hold up my finger, focus on it, then remove it, my eyes quickly shift to the next thing in my line of sight.

 

Once in a long while though, it seems to work with my tulpa, if my sense of her presence there is strong enough and there's something at close to the right distance nearby. (Meaning of "nearby" subject to change.)


Lyra: human female, ~17

Evan: boy, ~14, was an Eevee

Anera: anime-style girl, ~12; Lyra made her

My blog :: Time expectations are bad (forcing time targets are good though)

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A lot of people say they never needed to worry about where to position their eyes because they move them like that naturally, but you should just try whatever feels comfortable. I'm not making hard and fast rules here, just suggestions.

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Guest Anonymous

I do sculpting all the time. Also, any human anamatronic videos you would suggest?

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I always used to be so afraid of animatronics when I was little. I think it must have been because of the Uncanny Valley.

 

Anyway, good tips, and thanks for the video of the zombie dog. I didn't read your description of it beforehand, and simply thought it was a video of a dead dog.

 

And Jimmy, I think for human reference you could just as easily look up robotics videos, which do basically the same thing, just not in a film sense.

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