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Ember.Vesper

Is Switching in Traumatic and Tulpa Systems Similar?

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Added quote to include context. If you would like to see the original thread, please go here. -Ranger
 

11 hours ago, Ranger said:
On 2/26/2020 at 3:01 AM, spill that tea said:

i think its important that while tulpamancy is different to DID, the skills we learn here like switching and possesion looks a lot like it and we cant just dismiss them. there are a lots of things tulpamancy can pick up from other systems

 
No, traumatic switching and tulpamantic switching are really different. I don't want to go into detail here because it would derail the thread.

 


Derailing or not, if you make an allegation, it is subject to challenge.

 

Triggered switching in multiple systems is different from intentional switching in tulpamantic systems, yes, and I assume that is what you are talking about. However, this is primarily a difference between triggered switching and intentional switching, rather than a difference between multiple switching and tulpamantic switching.

 

The default condition of traumagenic multiple systems is to switch as a coping mechanism for stressful situations. The system unconsciously puts the alter in charge that it deems most appropriate to the situation. From a rational perspective, this often a poor choice based on situations that no longer exist and considerations that are no longer relevant. However, once alters become aware of one another and learn to communicate, they can learn to take control over most of their own switching and to prevent all but the most intensely provoked triggered switching. All the multiple systems of my personal acquaintance eventually learned this. The techniques they use are very similar to those of tulpamancers. I attribute a portion of my own system's trivial ease at mastering switching to years of familiarity with watching my ex-wives switch and talking to them about what they did.

 

Meanwhile, tulpamantic systems can use intention and habit to intentionally create triggers that bring a useful headmate forward in a situation. The Bears' Forcing Filter experiment evolved into this after only a few days:

 

https://community.tulpa.info/topic/14585-forcing-filter-experiment

 

Mild triggers can happen unintentionally even in nontraumatic systems. For example, if I'm switched in and one of Vesper's friends spots me and calls out to her, she may be triggered in without either of us thinking about it or consenting to it, only realizing what happened later, when given a chance to reflect.

 

-Ember

Edited by Ranger
Added quote and note

I'm not having fun here anymore, so we've decided to take a bit of a break, starting February 27, 2020. - Ember

 

Ember - Soulbonder, Female, 39 years old, from Georgia, USA . . . . [Our Progress Report] . . . . [How We Switch]

Vesper Dowrin - Insourced Soulbond from London, UK, World of Darkness, Female, born 9 Sep 1964, bonded ~12 May 2017

Iris Ravenlock - Insourced Soulbond from the Winter Court of Faerie, Dresdenverse, Female, born 6 Jun 1982, bonded ~5 Dec 2015

 

'Real isn't how you are made,' said the Skin Horse. 'It's a thing that happens to you.' - The Velveteen Rabbit

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On 2/26/2020 at 10:14 PM, Ranger said:

No, traumatic switching and tulpamantic switching are really different. I don't want to go into detail here because it would derail the thread.

  

First, I would like to explain why I said this. A traumatic system can experience a much wider spectrum of dissociation while switching. Assuming switching to wonderland with parallel processing isn't real, a tulpa system will never have to worry about a switch resulting in blacking out, losing consciousness, and being unable to recall what happened after switching. When I go inactive or get "thrown in the back seat", I'm still able to quickly come back with a trigger where an alter can be drowned out for long periods of time.
 

I like to think of our switching as a "weaker" switch because both Cat and I are capable of possession while the other is switched-in and our expectation is we will continue to use possession. As a result, if Cat switches out, she does not lose the ability to control the body completely, she only loses the authority of getting to control the body first and having say as to who does or does not control the body. This is different from Lucilyn's switching where when she switches in, Lumi loses the ability to control the body completely. However, for what I believe to be reasonably possible, that's as extreme of a dissociative experience switching can become for a tulpa system through means of learning healthy, non-medical dissociation.

 

I am highly skeptical the old fashioned "wonderland switching" is achievable by tulpa systems since most tulpamancers do not report experiencing a divide in consciousness. Cat can assume a wonderland form and run around in wonderland while switched-out, but she can't talk to anyone else in our system or think about other things while she is inactive.
 

On 2/27/2020 at 12:00 AM, Ember.Vesper said:

Triggered switching in multiple systems is different from intentional switching in tulpamantic systems, yes, and I assume that is what you are talking about. However, this is primarily a difference between triggered switching and intentional switching, rather than a difference between multiple switching and tulpamantic switching.


This was not my main argument, but I slightly agree that the difference between accidental and tulpa switching is the main factor here. I know some tulpa systems that also struggle to control their switching and one of the goals for traumatic systems is to learn controlled switching.

If an alter in the back wants to switch in and take control from the fronter, then that's still intentional, even if there is a lack of consent. I think in most cases the system would have some kind of agreement or warning system assuming the alters know each other, but if the fronter isn't aware of the other alter I doubt this would require the fronter's consent. In a tulpa system, at least a previously fronting headmate knows or later remembers the culprit of who is taking the front and they have a better chance of influencing them to give the body back because they are more interconnected with their headmate than the two hypothetical alters.
 

On 2/27/2020 at 12:00 AM, Ember.Vesper said:

However, once alters become aware of one another and learn to communicate, they can learn to take control over most of their own switching and to prevent all but the most intensely provoked triggered switching.


That's the other key difference- tulpamancers do not have switching triggers directly connected to trauma. I have never heard of a tulpa system that gained PTSD or cPTSD after becoming a system, so it is unclear if trauma and switching would be connected, or in other words, a tulpamancer developing DID. Otherwise, tulpa systems I am aware of who reported having trauma histories have no connection between learning switching and their trauma. It is true that a tulpa and trauamtic system can lay down manual triggers to better control their switching, but that technique will probably have to be expanded on for systems who are trying to override triggers related to severe trauma to include skills specific to coping with trauma.


I'm Ranger, Gray's/Cat_ShadowGriffin's tulpa, and I love hippos! I also like cake and chatting about stuff.

My other headmates have their own account now.

Temporary Log | Switching LogcBox | Yay!

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