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Ringgggg's somewhat-comprehensive foxgirl imposition log


ringgggg

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13 hours ago, ringgggg said:

was your motivation at least relatively consistent during imposition? Did you tell yourself anything going into it?

when i was learning my five senses, i would practice every day, usually for multiple hours. it started out mostly as just messing around and experimenting, but when i started to see progress with auditory imposition, i realized that becoming good at imposition was actually doable for me, sparked a wildfire of motivation. that only grew stronger when i had success with touch imposition relatively quickly. visual imposition was a lot slower, and at times i got frustrated with it and started to lose motivation somewhat, but i never stopped practicing. once i finally managed to create semi-stable opaque visual impositions, my motivation increased further and i started practicing more than ever before (pretty much whenever i wasn't doing something else that required my concentration). i was perhaps a bit less motivated to work on smell and taste, but i saw it as pretty much my victory lap, and it is more difficult to use dedicated imposition training sessions for smell and especially taste

 

i hope that answers your question

I have a tulpa named Miela who I love very much.

 

 
"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"

-Me

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6 hours ago, Breloomancer said:

i hope that answers your question

It does, thank you. It helps to have a more down-to-earth understanding of how someone approached it.

 

Screwing around and finding out is a vital step in the process, as I’ve come to find out

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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I've been starting to notice things.

 

Whenever I'm bored in class, I like to impose simple shapes on my desk. However, today I noticed that the shapes had this strange fullness to them. I knew that the main goal of imposition was to have whatever I impose "accepted into reality" and treated with the same amount of certainty as everything else, but I never imagined how it'd actually feel like to have that happen. I felt depth in the shapes' images; they were able to sync to the surrounding environment's perspective when I looked at them from different angles, and I could swear they felt real. Maybe it was my art studies that did the heavy lifting on the perspective front though, I dunno

 

The craziest part about it is that the environment behind the projection now has a slight warping to it (with some additional, near-invisible noise), almost as if everything behind the imposed shape was being pushed out of existence. It's still there, mind you, but if I suddenly impose an object and look at it in the foreground, the background didn't just blur; it felt "out of touch". It was beginning to feel faker than the projections themselves. 

 

It's all very hard to explain, and I initially didn't want to document this because I thought it was too minor a change for attention to be given, but I realize that gradual progress is supposed to feel gradual. It's almost like a single degree change in temperature being able to just barely melt an icecube - if you read the intro analogy to Atomic Habits, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. Point being I'd rather go and write about some odd, minute change than write nothing at all.

 

Every "huh, that's weird" moment is a step forward

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've made a small breakthrough with imposition! As I was training opacity, the conflicting colors in the background slowly started to fade into a single, opaque shade of gray. I had convinced myself that the objects behind where I was imposing were not real, and that they would soon fade away into nothingness if I just kept my focus on imposing. I wouldn't be typing an entry if it never worked.

 

The exercise consisted of me cuffing my hands into a ring shape so that I wouldn't have to worry about retaining the cohesion of the circle. If I just made my hands where the circle starts and stops, the focus could remain solely on opacity instead of other processes. Have to isolate the variables somehow

 

The darker objects in front of me felt like they were slowly morphing into kasina afterimages while they faded out (that's the burnt-in image of a light after you look at it for too long, for those out of the loop), while the lighter shade of the background was gradually taken over by visual noise so that it eventually read as the gray hue.  With some heavy concentration, I noticed the lighter and darker shades beginning to meet in the middle. It was only a couple seconds later that I was left with a very unstable yet ineffably-cool circle of gray.

 

It only held for a couple seconds, but that's probably understandable considering the fact that I've barely gotten used to it. Still very happy with what I'm seeing

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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Apparently poor metacognition amounts to a higher chance of hallucinating in general. You literally have to stop thinking about your own thoughts and convince (delude) yourself that it's possible. It's the ultimate form of the self-fulfilling prophecy.

 

I'm thinking hypnosis is substantially beneficial to imposition just solely for that reason

 

I've put a couple surface-level scholarly articles in the resources page so that you too can experience the same paradigm shift I did.

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had luck imposing a thin cylinder ~30 minutes into yesterday’s session.


After having lined up the cylinder’s base with the floor, I circled around it for a couple minutes with intense focus until the noise on it began to turn greenish-purple, not unlike the kasina afterimages I described in the previous report. 


The noise was laid out in large, vague splotches around the shape, which made some parts stand out less than others. It actually moved with the shape when I circled around it again, and that was the part that caught my attention. Noise around 3d impositions usually doesn’t “stick to the shape” when I start to change position, at least not for more than a couple seconds, which made this a very interesting development. I haven’t had something like this happen in a while, but I’m glad it did.


In other developments, I’ve messed around more with self-hypnosis, and as a result presence imposition feels even ‘realer’ than what I could’ve accomplished otherwise. This is even true for brighter environments, despite the background being visible. 


In the past, I’ve had to do some crazy mental gymnastics in order to convince myself of the legitimacy of my impositions. This is obviously problematic when half of imposition is belief. Thankfully, hypnosis has solved that problem by limiting my stream of thought to just be fixated exclusively on my imposition. I don’t have to think hard about imposing, I just do it now. My own words tell me what to do, and hearing them being repeated to me over and over solidifies my objective.


Running and physical exercise are two things I can focus a lot more on now that I have more time to myself. They’ve been great for my resolve. I think the concept of doing slightly uncomfortable things to get your brain used to the non-comfort zone is genius. If it won’t kill me to go out and run a little, I’m sure the same could be said for imposition practice.

 

It’s good to see habits working in tandem with each other.

 

Spoiler

Z0GzHyZu8UX8wWeLWd-OUGrbkAneMYwCCpPY3PetWgSeXaialGLRa13VAVGhBH57km-52bo1VFWdsEJluFpp6MDqz9Cnk-0d8V6EpefQ0bTe4P3XzM7M98i06lksvE3A641A7Z1bo_Opcp2JvFUM4HQ

A3 amongst doodles.

 

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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Today I began to look into some older techniques. Most of the session involved something I tried (and mentioned on here) a couple months ago, where I would "wrap" visual noise around presence imposition and make the two work in tandem with each other in an attempt to get a more opaque and palpable form. Visual noise generally exists in such a way that it looks like an overlay on top of regular vision, but it can in fact be "laid" on top of to 3D objects to mess around with it in a more spatial manner.

 

I was pleasantly surprised at the results after concentrating for a while. As long as the light from my background candle was hitting my eyes, I could just barely make out the noise conforming to A3's boundaries as I imposed. The texture of noise resembled a misty cloud suspended inside her figure, mostly in part to its translucence and fluctuating coherence.

 

The fact that I could visibly tell the difference between her and the background, even for that small window of time, was remarkable to me. I'll be coming back to this at some point because it just needs to be built on. Can't believe I forgot about this despite me mentioning in the original report that it was a byproduct of just regular practice (which it is, I just never built on it for all these months). It is what it is I guess

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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  • 2 weeks later...

I’ve decided to change the way I approach imposition, and I’m going to put it out there that it might just have been for the better. 


My workspace before was against a wall; this made it hard to work from all angles and thus imposition was slow and tedious. Having a bigger, more open space really helped solve that problem. I had more room to move around my impositions over and over and get all those weird angles in. I think a more open space in general promoted moving around like that, which helped bring me away from becoming over-reliant on mindsculpting to define depth in imposition.


Then came the realization that I had been shooting myself in the foot by not actively moving around A3 for all this time. Since mindsculpting makes it so that your real, corporeal limbs are the main determiner of where all the invisible stuff exists spatially, the quality and lucidity of imposition naturally drops when you step back and stop sculpting. It’s like taking training wheels on and off of a bike. My problem sprung from never actually taking the training wheels off, which meant that every time I did take them off I’d fall flat. No hands, no clarity.


So I naturally started to gravitate towards a more hands-off approach when my workspace was no longer at a wall. I’d walk around A3, stare at her intensely, and only sculpt in moderation, running my hands along where I thought the form needed to be clarified. Then, I’d shift around said area back and forth like I was panning a camera around an object. When I was finished with that, I’d run my hands along the area again to review the form. Test, stop, sculpt. Test, stop, sculpt. I’m sure you’ve heard that before.


It’s been a good two weeks since I started imposing like this, and I can tell you right now that there's a noticeable distinction from what I was used to doing. I’m happy with the change I made.

 


 

Right now I have two main objectives for imposition; one based on the previous report, and the other based on this one:

  1. To make my imposition more opaque (visual noise “wrapping”)
  2. To make my imposition more stable (real-world integration)

These will at least clarify what I'm shifting my focus towards.

 

I’m not the best imposer, not by a long shot. However, if there’s one thing I’ve learned about imposition, it’s that it’s really easy to get a feel for what works and what doesn’t once you've settled in. And that’s the main thing I want to focus the most on when I post, even if it may be limited to my own learning curve.


I have no idea how many posts it’ll take to fully express my thoughts, but it’s not like I want to, anyway. Better to let them flow haphazardly than to predict what I’ll be thinking about next.
 

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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New favorite practice technique: imposing objects comprised of simple 3d shapes and proceeding to spin them around while you wave your hands around them like some kind of maniac wizard trying to conjure up a floating coca cola can

Step 1: Make

Step 2: Believe

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