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Scientific / spirtual explanations of Tulpas and does it abide to Christianity?

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The most spiritual reference I could imagine from a christian point of view would be how God created man in his image--and he is a creator. We ourselves could be considered to have a smaller level of that same need for creation and companionship and thus our minds are formed in a way as to create--ideas, characters, stories, maybe as far as a tulpa. As opposed to viewing them as spirits from another realm, viewing them as a part of ourself, a creation we made of our own mind, our inventive spirit being a gift from God.

 

I don't see a tulpa as being anything else really, it is a mental process and while it could be used for spiritual reasons, I don't see the tulpa coming FROM anywhere else but our minds.


 

 

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Why is a connection to one of the sanest and most peaceful religions I can think of, supposed to be scary?

 

Because Christians who believe that all other religions are paganism would avoid it like the plague for fear of breaking the first commandment or something. Either that, or that tulpas are demons that try to influence you.


 

*___* What did I just watch?

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It might be a matter of interpretation. The bible doesn't say anything about the psychological point of view, but if you see a Tulpa as a product of occult practices (summoning spirits/demons etc.), it is forbidden.

 

There are several quotes concerning sorcery in the bible, and it clearly states not to take part in these rituals.

 

When you come into the land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominable practices of those nations. There shall not be found among you anyone who burns his son or his daughter as an offering, anyone who practices divination or tells fortunes or interprets omens, or a sorcerer or a charmer or a medium or a necromancer or one who inquires of the dead, for whoever does these things is an abomination to the Lord. And because of these abominations the Lord your God is driving them out before you.

What is a Tulpa? Blog

Rainbow 'Alyx' Dash

Pronto

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Hello, I have three questions.

1. What is the scientific explanation for a tulpa (How does it work, why, and such)?

2. What is the spiritual explanation for a tulpa?

3. Does it abide by Christianity, and what do you think God would think of it?

Thank you for your time.

1. Not available yet. Closest thing we have come up with is a branch of your subconscious being "awakened" and being embodied by a self induced hallucinatory schism.

2. See 1. Also, question is irreverent humans do not have souls.

3. Also irreverent there is no god. But my close friend who's a big Christfag worked on a chalupa of a good bit. But if I had to guess, I would assume he would see it as some form of witchcraft. But if he' more progressive, then he is likely to not give a fuck.


"Your parents will never be magic talking horses"

-Anonymous

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I was tempted to not respond at all, because I do not want to even be associated with this thread and most of the responses within it.

 

1. What is the scientific explanation for a tulpa (How does it work, why, and such)?

 

Answer: There are many explanation scattered throughout the site, including one on the welcome page at www.tulpa.info. Please choose the one with which you are most comfortable. None of these explanations are scientific in terms of a theory developed and tested through the scientific process. I would use the term "model" instead of "scientific explanation."

 

Here is my working explanation. Thoughtforms (including tulpas, imaginary friends, servitors, wonderlands, memory palaces, and operating systems a.k.a. HUDs) are constructs of the mind that alter or reorganize perception for that mind. A tulpa in particular is a highly engineered construct developed through practice for perceiving reality (including the self and the outside world) as a different entity with differing interests, differing point of view (intellectually), and possibly differing conclusions. This explanation is far from perfect, but as a working model, it suits my purposes.

 

Side Note: There is no definition for TUPLA in my copy of the New Oxford American Dictionary Second Edition. There is a definition for THOUGHT FORM (spelled as two different words): noun. (especially in Christian theology) a combination of presuppositions, imagery, and vocabulary current at a particular time or place and forming the context for thinking on a subject. That is not how we on this board use the term THOUGHTFORM at all! We are, therefore, all wrong. Never question the Oxford.

 

2. What is the spiritual explanation for a tulpa?

 

Answer: That differs from one user to another even more than the many psychological explanations mentioned above. I will not attempt to explain tulpa in terms of the original Tibetian context, and I am unconvinced that anyone on this particular forum is qualified to do so either.

 

The wikipedia page on tulpa is remarkably short. Here is a sentence I copied which is particularly relevant. "The term 'thoughtform' is used as early as 1927 in Evans-Wentz translation of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, described as 'giving palpable being to a visualization, in very much the same manner as an architect gives concrete expression in three dimensions to [...] his blue-print'."[4]

 

Helena Blavatsky, a Russian circus performer turned founder of a psuedo-religion, had her own definition of the term TULPA. I am having trouble finding it now, but I recall it being highly reactionary.

 

3. Does it abide by Christianity, and what do you think God would think of it?

 

There is no direct conflict between tulpa and Biblical teachings. Furthermore, I know of no direct conflict between tulpa and the dogma of any particular Christian denomination. On one hand, Christian theologians who are particularly faithful about the existence of demons and other esoteric evils might interpret a tulpa as an access point through which something bad can reach and attempt harm on the host. Such an interpretation would vastly conflict with the psychological models back in Question #1. On the other hand, there is a long established history of Christians using meditation techniques which are similar to tulpa creation. Specifically, I am thinking of the first iteration of the Jesuits before that order was disbanded.

 

Soooo, it really depends on which Christian you are asking the question.


my thoughtform = Isis

her appearance = stylized rabbit with dark fur and glowing eyes

her developmental stage = imaginary friend

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