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Weight of Thought


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I had come to a conclusion today, so I wrote a description of it. I wouldn't call it a "paper", since I'm too lazy to actually find sources for my statements, but I'll just assume everything I said is an undisputed fact.

 

I'll paste it below, tell me what you think. pls no metaphyics, this is an armchair psychology thread so I'm hoping for constructive replies. This is more about how the brain works than tulpas, so if you only care about souls or something then don't read.

 

Thoughts are not equal things, they are part of a concept, given value by emotion and what memories they're linked to.

 

Thoughts can have "weight", that is, importance and expectation. Something that took three days to invent has more weight than something that took an hour, because the former is expected to perform more. This thought of it had more time in the focus of the conjurer, and thus is more prevalent in their mind. There is an interesting line here. If the conjurer were instead directly told of this invention, instead of spending three days thinking about it, it would have less weight than the invention that took an hour to make. It's the same thought, but it's not the same concept, it isn't carrying around the same range of emotion and memories that it would if it were thought up by the conjurer. This is why when you see one person rambling to the other, the rambler looks a lot more excited than the ramblee, because they had more time to think about it.

 

This can also be analogized to paranoia. A non-paranoid person would not notice small things, or if they did, brush them off, like someone looking at them before leaving. A paranoid person might notice that person looking at them, and consider it, putting more weight on it. They would begin pondering their intent, all the while stacking more weight on the thought and making it's essence more prevalent. Now a conspiracy has formed from this one simple thought, a whole world spawned from a second. That is the power of imagination, and the weight of thoughts.

 

Now, this brings to mind the tulpa, or thoughtform. People commonly take weeks to months attempting to give a concept it's own life and independence. They believe they are training their brain to entertain two or more difference consciousness at the same time, and while doing so, shape their concept and put weight on it. The importance here is the weight. By continuously thinking about this thoughtform, they are putting more and more expectation on it. Of course, this is the key that separates a thoughtform from a simple imaginary friend, the fact that the conjurer has put so much weight of expecting the thoughtform to behave like an independent being, it does so. The conjurer expects it to pick it's own form, and it does so, the conjurer unconsciously doing it to keep itself happy, as the brain enjoys being correct and having a solid understanding of it's reality; so if it truly wishes, it does. The conjurer expects more, it expects the thoughtform to express differing opinion, and to have thoughts that surprise even the conjurer. At that, with all the weight the conjurer put on these expectations, genuinely expecting the thoughtform to do these things, the conjurer unconsciously pulls out differing opinions, or gives an extra second to consider a thought before allowing the thoughtform to express them. These actions are unconscious, so they surprise the conjurer, unless they really wanted to backtrack their thoughts and discover how they came to those conclusions.

 

In conclusion, it is not that the brain is directly configuring itself to entertain a new consciousness, but the fact that the creation of the thoughtform takes so long is what actually creates the thoughtform. If a conjurer were to tell another conjurer about their thoughtform, the thought would enter their head, but not have nearly as much weight as their own thoughtform. If they think of the other conjurer's thoughtform long enough, it will have more weight. Probably not enough weight to be entertained as a new thoughtform, but more weight than it had previously had as a short description. In addition, I believe this is why a conjurer will normally get a headache when imagining their thoughtform during the creation process, because they are actively learning, changing their concept of reality, and thus putting strain on their brains. I also liken the weight system to that of a patient experiencing sensory derivation. It is not directly the fact that they are experiencing a lack of senses that causes them to hallucinate, but the fact that they expect sensory input to happen, and it doesn't, is why the patient "thinks up" their own sensory input, imagining lights and colors and sounds that they do not directly control, but their brains are unconsciously conjuring in order to make itself happy, as it expects sensory input, and does not want to be wrong.

Scarlet - anime, 8/15/2012

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In conclusion, it is not that the brain is directly configuring itself to entertain a new consciousness, but the fact that the creation of the thoughtform takes so long is what actually creates the thoughtform.

...assuming it takes "so long", which isn't the case for some people, myself included.

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I meant "so long" as in "an undetermined amount of time" rather than "a lengthy amount of time". I'm primarily referring to the norm anyway, I know everyone's different.

Scarlet - anime, 8/15/2012

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Forgive my rudeness for somewhat skimming your text, and thus making any mistakes or misunderstandings, if I have.

 

Relating to what HazyM mentioned, if we were to apply your logic, then I think 'time' would not be such a great factor in contributing to the weight of an idea. Instead, look at the detail or, say, intensity of a thought. Like your example of a paranoid person. The fear that person experienced was conjured up in a moment, yet it is incredibly intense. If you were to argue that time has been invested into the paranoid person' fear in the past, such as a bad experience, however brief, then I would reply that it only really takes one terrible experience in the early stages of one's life to give the (thought of the) potential for that experience to happen again, a lot of weight.

 

Once again, if we were to take this time a young child being told by their parent that, say, "Marmite is bad for you" (as a lame example for the sake of context). If the child is told that Marmite is bad, they may not necessarily question it or put much thought/weight on the idea. They might not even think of it again until they come across a jar of Marmite. But since it was the child's parent that gave them this piece of information, they instantly put a lot of weight on the idea that Marmite may be bad/unhealthy. So, to apply your logic, another factor that influences weight is who the idea comes from, and how much the first person (in this case the child) is able to think for themselves.

 

Now on the other hand, if we were to put 'time' and 'experience' hand in hand, then the creation process of tulpas might become a little different. A host who has the experience of creating a tulpa before, would theoretically take less time to create another tulpa. By that I mean, they have gone through the creation process before, they are slightly more apt at conjuring up or brainstorming ideas on how that tulpa would be like. This means they might take less time to create the idea of that tulpa before the creation process, or even need less time before they are able to easily converse with and visualise their new tulpa.

 

So the host with more experience would take less time to develop their second tulpa. But that does not necessarily mean that the thoughtform created has less weight, or less importance/potential. But the weight of the thoughtform can be measured by the experience of the host (which yes, does relate to time, as experience takes time) and the intensity or/of the detail of the idea which created the thoughtform.

 

Expectations put more weight to an idea.

Yes, I suppose that's true (let's remind ourselves that in this context, weight means importance or potential, right?). Mentally, if you expect something to happen, it likely will. If you have great expectations, that contributes to your belief that something will happen, when it comes to thoughtforms, expectations/beliefs are fundamental.

 

These are my thoughts so far on your ideas.

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Thank you Near. I agree with your stance, I've actually implied what you've written when I mentioned emotions near the top. But I should have gone into detail more about the emotions that it carries. Regardless, I don't think emotions have too much to do with tulpa development (it had to do with it of course, it's just not the focus), people primarily focus on time, with development being a gradual process of small surprises, so I focused on time in this document due to that. The subject here is allowing yourself a lot of time to build up expectations.

 

Also, I must, personally, disagree with what you said about creating more tulpas. I've made two more after my first, they were indeed faster to make, and unfortunately, after a while I had forgotten about them, which is another reason I came to this conclusion. I didn't have as much expectation for them, so the concept of them meant less to me than my first tulpa.

Scarlet - anime, 8/15/2012

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I can see where you're coming from. My experience differs in that I am not as close to my first tulpa as I am to one of my later ones. And for me as a writer, the stories that I have the least expectations for turn out to have great potential, and the ones I thought had great potential... well, most of them didn't even make it past the first page. But somehow, the practice pieces which I don't intend to spend too long on end up growing and growing in pages and chapters. One creative piece I did was only meant to be a one shot to improve on my description of atmosphere and scenery, and it ended up with over 100 pages. The story I'm working on right now was also meant to be a practice, and yet, I did not expect for it to have reached 60 pages in such a short space of time.

 

To be honest, I don't know how I could apply your concept of weight to that, because I really didn't expect for those practice pieces to become so complex. However, I did give those stories a second chance by looking back on them, perhaps that's somehow investing thought and time into them to give them more weight. And that applies to some of the tulpas whom I really get along with today. Anyhow, I thought I would share that anecdote with you.

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Ah, that's different. I'm talking purely about concepts. On the other hand, if you've got expectations for a physical thing, the more you build them up, the less good the final product looks. I was mainly referencing sensory deprivation when I wrote about building up expectations. That's interesting about your tulpas, though.

Scarlet - anime, 8/15/2012

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See this is what I mean about skimming texts... *Reads final paragraph*

 

So expectations manifest sensory input in order to satisfy those expectations and relieve sensory deprivation. Now if you put it that way... Yes, that is plausible. I remember my teacher (who teaches psychology) drawing four dots on the white board. Then he asked, "What shape is this?" and all the naive little year 7s put their hands up and said "It's a square!" when in fact it wasn't a square, it was only four dots. But my teacher explained, using that rather lame trick, that the subconscious mind automatically fills in the gaps. It's also what happens with optical illusions where the picture isn't moving, but your brain thinks it is according to its own logic.

 

Having said that, I suck at imposition. Or hallucination. Honestly I can't remember what you call it, but visualising your tulpa in your own environment, right? I wouldn't know very much about how expectations manifest sensory input, I do all my visualisation inside my mindscape. But, I do see how you came up with the idea about sensory input. However I can't say much else about it due to lack of experience.

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Ah, this doesn't cover imposition, although I am curious about that now. Maybe some people who've achieved imposition can share their theories. I'm not sure if I've achieved it, I just imagine mine being there and she's there enough, I pretty much write that over my memory, so in retrospect it does feel like she was there to me. Though I believe her entire presence in the real world is an active thing on my part, so I don't think it has anything to do with this. My only theory is that the real world provides enough sensory input, so it's difficult or unnecessary to make information where it already exists. I also believe this is why some imposition guides recommend going in a dark, quiet room, where there's little to no sensory information, which is also something I've wanted to try.

 

But thank you for seeing where I'm coming from with this, I think it's a legitimate theory that could provide some structure for the future of the scientific side of this.

Scarlet - anime, 8/15/2012

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Looks like I'm getting ahead of myself. That's true. It's hard to impose when there's a lot of things going on. I somehow feel like my tulpa, or who/whatever it is I'm imposing has to reach that same level of realism, or live up to how realistic my environment is to me. You probably have to be a little dazed or space out a little (if you're a beginner, anyway), anything to blur that heavy distinction between what's there and what you're trying to conjure up.

 

A quiet room, yes, perhaps one with not so many objects to take up concentration. A dark room, as long as there is some light (too dark and realistically, you wouldn't be able to see your tulpa and that takes you back to in-world visualisation), can also help. It can relax your eyes, though it might peak your other senses since the brain will have to rely on the other four to gather information from its surroundings. For me though, a dark and quiet room is perfect for in-world visualisation, since it focuses on what happens in the mindscape and not what's going on outside.

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