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When do tulpas become sentient?


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Sentience is achieved gradually through forcing. There's no set time in which your tulpa will become sentient, it could take several weeks, months, or years to achieve full sentience.

 

Tulpas generally communicate through 'tulpish' first, generally felt as raw thought and emotion. They may also communicate through gestures and body language. Eventually, they may begin to speak through a voice in your mind, often sounding similar to your own mindvoice but gradually becoming their own. To hear an actual voice when they speak is called vocal imposition, something that's usually rather far down the tulpamancing road.

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Sentience is achieved gradually through forcing. There's no set time in which your tulpa will become sentient, it could take several weeks, months, or years to achieve full sentience.

 

Weeks and months make sense, but I think years might be stretching it a little bit. To put it like Chupi said, "Time Expectations are tulpa poison." Making a tulpa is different for everyone. Some develop sentience quicker than others and some don't. (I just contradicted myself didn't I?) One of the ways to make sure that they're sentient is asking them to surprise you.

"It's all about synthesis, you don't have to be a real musician. You just synthesize your own reality, synthesize your own talents." -Klayton

 

My Three Mind Horses

Haven: Tulpa #1

Created on 10-28-14

Aphelion: Tulpa #2

Created on 2-25-15 

Chimera: Self Proclaimed Thoughtform

Created on: Can't remember. Sometime around Easter of 2017.

 

Warning: I am a huge nerd.

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Weeks and months make sense, but I think years might be stretching it a little bit. To put it like Chupi said, "Time Expectations are tulpa poison." Making a tulpa is different for everyone. Some develop sentience quicker than others and some don't. (I just contradicted myself didn't I?) One of the ways to make sure that they're sentient is asking them to surprise you.

 

I added years because there have been tulpas who have taken years to become sentient and because it sounded better to have three time examples in that sentence

 

Like you said, some tulpas develop sentience quicker than others, but some tulpas also develop sentience slower than others. There should be no expectation for how long it might take, because it could as easily take weeks as it could take years; it all depends on the tulpa.

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Sentience and vocality are a bit different. To answer your question, tulpas tend to speak in thoughts and feelings before words, which at some point will be easy enough to interpret meanings from, if not completely formed sentences. They'll learn to speak as you speak and listen to them, just gotta let it happen.

 

You can tell they're sentient when you aren't creating their actions yourself. Whenever they do things on their own, such as speak/mindvoice to you, move or make gestures, or anything else. Sentience usually comes before learning to communicate, but for those with either puppetting or vocality problems, the time can differ.

Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.

Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.

My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.

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Guest amber5885

Toby was vocal for a while before I knew he was sentient. I got the idea he might be when his opinions started differing from mine and I was sure when i went into our wonderland and he gave me a cherry tree.

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There really isn't ever a clear turning point when you are aware that your tupper goes from not sentient to sentient, it's not that black and white. I like to compare it to evolution: say you have one species that, over millions of years has evolved into another species. For the sake of simplicity, I'll use primates-humans. If you took a family line of skulls that went all the way from the primate to the human, it would be pretty huge. Ok either end, you could look at the skull and pretty much conclusively determine whether it was a primate or a human. However, the closer you get to the middle, the more blurred the line gets. This goes for sentience as well, I think.

[align=center]Even though my username is that of my tulpa, Quilten, my name is Phaneron, the host, who does all of the actual posting.

Tulpas: Quilten, Jira

[/align]

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Sam Harris has a pretty clever way of demonstrating the concept of free will. If you can, make a fist with one hand and then open that fist. (Or whatever else: twitching a toe, flexing and pointing a foot, moving an eyebrow, rolling your eyes.) Now consider the difference between that and a random muscle spasm. That's what sentience feels like...to us on the inside.

 

But, "free will" is only a concept. If we try to map it out in neurons or relationship accountability, then it can work but also shows to rely on neurological structure, DNA, health, or societal conditioning. In that way, free will doesn't exist as much as we think it does, in the way that we think it does.

 

So, part of me believes that tulpas have nascent sentience when we get an idea of what we want them to be. Why that form and not another? Maybe that inspiration, even if we own it, is the tulpa's "prodromal" sentience showing. But when we no longer need to feel like we're making a "fist" so to speak of the tulpa's form and personality, then that could be the turning point that you're looking for. Maybe switching forms in the brainstorming stage would make it faster.

 

Basically, I believe the tulpa is a sort of eddy in the currents of the subconscious. Sentience is what it feels like when the current is moving your boat and not your exhaustive paddle, and inspiration is the strength of the current. If you could map the rivers and oceans of your mind, that would be neat, but I think with a lot of people they're mysterious and keep changing and can surprise you with out-of-season swelling and sudden giant tidal waves.

 

I like to compare it to evolution

 

Maybe a simpler example, also for evolution, is, "When did the eyeball evolve?" There's this idea that half an eyeball doesn't do any animal along the family line any good, but evolutionary progress was "light-sensing cells that got better at sensing light."

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