Guest amber5885

What is going on here?

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Guest amber5885

I take everyone seriously until proven otherwise, I do know how bad it can be to turn your back on someone who is Actually sick it's the "sociopaths" that bother me more than anything.

 

1) they don't diagnose that until after you turn 18 at least because it's so hard to diagnose.

 

2) most people think that not giving a shit makes you a sociopath... It doesn't. Sociopaths, narcassistic an psychopaths all run in the same category what defines them primarily is not necessarily lack of empathy so much as cruel, manipulative and violent behavior. While some sociopaths can keep their rage in check it's not likely. Like a fraction of a percent not likely.

 

3) odds are good if you think you're a sociopath you're not because one thing that defined them is their complete inability to see fault in themselves. Their egos are too huge, they Litteraly can't do it.

 

I also find it intriguing that this has turned I to a psychology debate. I love psychology. It's one of my favorite things to talk about.

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1) they don't diagnose that until after you turn 18 at least because it's so hard to diagnose.

 

This is true, although I personally believe that it has more to do with our court system and the fact that Antisocial Personality Disorder is the most socially misunderstood disorder of them all. Not saying that it's easy to diagnose, it's absolutely a nightmare to diagnose since clients/patients/criminal suspects that are actually afflicted with ASPD are very unlikely to be forthright during the diagnosis process.

 

2) most people think that not giving a shit makes you a sociopath... It doesn't. Sociopaths, narcassistic an psychopaths all run in the same category what defines them primarily is not necessarily lack of empathy so much as cruel, manipulative and violent behavior. While some sociopaths can keep their rage in check it's not likely. Like a fraction of a percent not likely.

 

True. They like to manipulate, and when they aren't successful, they have very little ability to tolerate the stress of not getting what they want and how they want it.

 

3) odds are good if you think you're a sociopath you're not because one thing that defined them is their complete inability to see fault in themselves. Their egos are too huge, they Litteraly can't do it.

 

True, although someone diagnosed with ASPD may gloat about their diagnosis if they think it will benefit them in some small way. Although they won't likely care what you think unless it's necessary for them to get what they want.

 

All of this being said, while minors cannot be diagnosed with ASPD, they can be diagnosed with Conductive Disorder, which can be a precursor to ASPD. I would imagine that if a child is diagnosed as having CD, they are likely aware of its relation to ASPD as adults surrounding the child may try to get the child to be afraid of being diagnosed with something as taboo as having Antisocial Personality Disorder in order to turn their behavior around. Because CD isn't very well-known, and since its name does not illicit the same level of intrigue and fear as sociopathy or psychopathy does, a teen may use that term to better communicate with others regarding their situation ... or manipulate others, whatever the case may be. The terms sociopath was discarded by professional psychologists on the grounds that it really didn't accurately describe the disease from a lexicological standpoint. So for the past couple of releases of the DSM, they've switched the name of the disorder as they have tinkered with the diagnosing criteria to get it more in line with a) what works well for insurance companies; b) what works well with the pharmaceutical industry; and c) what is more in line with the latest research as the disorder is just so darn hard to figure out. From what I understand on the topic, the term psychopath was used up until about the 1930s, when it was discarded for sociopath, mainly because of the similarity between it and the terms "psychosis" and "psychopathology".

 

I also find it intriguing that this has turned I to a psychology debate. I love psychology. It's one of my favorite things to talk about.

 

Here's a bit of information I had to dig around for that is more current on the subject of psychopathy:

 

There's a somewhat recent movement among research psychologists to specify psychopathy as its own sub-type of ASPD or even categorize it as its own disorder, but it's such a hot issue that (from what I understand) the latest DSM more or less added it in as a footnote to the diagnosing criteria of ASPD as a specifier. There's a lot of debate in the research community on how to better incorporate the current definition of psychopathy ["a lack of anxiety or fear" combined with "a bold interpersonal style that may mask maladaptive behaviors (e.g., fraudulence)" http://focus.psychiatryonline.org/data/Journals/FOCUS/926935/189.pdf, pg 195.]. While there are researchers out there that believe psychopathy is a disorder that cannot ever be diagnosed with any accuracy and thus shouldn't be in the diagnosing lexicon, the current trend is towards either greater specificity or as a separate disorder ... and from what I understand, research is currently corroborating that trend. Currently the DSM-5 has it as a specifier, but it doesn't seem to be part of the diagnosing criteria. This being said, the revised version of the Psychopathy Checklist is still in use, and there is a scale known as Psychopathic Deviate within the very commonly used Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. It's a term known to the psychological research community, but I'm not so certain its official enough that anyone can be coined a true "psychopath" and I wish the term would not be used at all since it's not technically a disorder.

 

It's confusing issue from a research standpoint, and one that I can't really dive into without access to the proper academic journals ... god I miss school. I'm sorry if this wasn't well written, but my blood sugar is low and I wanted to do this at work while I had access to a full computer.

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Guest amber5885

No you did a great job. I need to do more research into A type personality disorders I've just been lazy.

I honestly wouldn't care as much as I do if it hadnt been for my family. Mental illness runs rampant in my family line. 2 aunts with schizophrenia, an uncle with ASPD, my grandpa is a narcassistic and so is my mom.

 

Needless to say I keep a very close watch on my mental health. I'm gonna be the one to stop the family chain and so far so good.

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Good lord, I wish you all the best. I've got my fair share of family members with questionable stability, but not to that extent. One had PTSD so bad he was permanently delusional, I have an aunt with bipolar disorder that believes she has reincarnated into an Englishwoman (that side is Italian), two uncles that have committed suicide and a cousin that attempted it (the Italian side seems to have a lot going on). I feel blessed to have been diagnosed with recurrent depression and the delusions I suffered from seem to have been temporary and have finally been absent for the first time in my adult life for the past three years. The most I get now is strange voices when I'm falling asleep, but they've always been benign.

 

As for the wall of text, I received my BA in psychology about a year and a.half ago and would like to continue on with a PhD to eventually do research in the relationship of culture and symptoms of psychopathology in hopes of increasing the accuracy of diagnosis. Psychology has been a passion of mine since before I even began exhibiting symptoms of pathological dis-ease when I was 15.

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Guest amber5885

I got lucky enough to make it out with, at first PTSD and borderline personality disorder which honestly isn't suprising all things considered.

 

I'm fine now. THANK GOD! I haven't had a depressive episode in years and I think separating myself from the family did a world of good and I do owe a lot to Toby. He's kept me stable and he's been a huge help to me.

 

Good luck on your studies. One thing we need is a better understanding of the human mind and good psychologists. I hope your symptoms go away for good one day :)

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