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Tulpae; Vol.1


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Hello, 'mancers!

 

I'm working together with a PhD doctor to compile a comprehensive volume on tulpae, as they go about their lives in the modern world. Thus far, I am to be consulting Tenzin Gyatso and various Tibetan Natives. Although, for this to fully come together, I will need to perform talk sessions with other diverse hosts and companions - - namely from other areas of the world besides that of China. This is the reason for why I'm coming here. If you would like to sign yourself up for [a] single/multiple session(s), simply contact me at "mvxre5ajjyp@aim.com" to notify me.

 

These sessions may include personal inquiries, and will require some extensive detail about individual experiences - - this is for research; not smalltalk. To protect the research that I've already done, the volume is not open to public view (and anyone involved in the research-end of this project is promised complete privacy). Any findings won't be available until the volume is published. Any questions - - I'll be monitoring this thread until further notice.

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Uh, Tibetan practice visualizes godforms to try to increase contact with their deities. They're not over there making ponies.

 

I'm pretty sure Buddhism doesn't have a deity.

 

Also a great deal of us here made tulpas for reasons other than pone. Plenty of us have done it for spiritual reasons, or just out of sheer curiosity.

"The Question is not who is going to let me, its who is going to stop me"~ Ayn Rand

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Uh, Tibetan practice visualizes godforms to try to increase contact with their deities. They're not over there making ponies.

 

What jackson said. I'm a little uneasy being compared to Tibetans. I also wonder if you're specifically looking for input from those who have imposed.

 

 

I'm pretty sure Buddhism doesn't have a deity.

 

You're right, but so is jackson.

 

The Buddhism most commonly taught in the west emphasizes the philosophical, and leaves out deities entirely -- and it's practiced like this in Asia as well. But as Buddhism spread, many countries adopted it into their existing belief structures -- kinda like how Christianity adopted pagan holidays like Yule and Easter. So, for example, the Chinese folk novel Journey to the West about how the Buddhist scriptures got from India to China describes the character Monkey going to heaven and causing trouble for the gods. Similarly, some branches of Indian Buddhism have adopted the Hindu gods. In Tibet, Buddhism adopted elements of their old religion, which is sometimes called Bon.

 

The closest thing to what we call tulpas is not what Alexandra David-Neel called tulpas. It's what she called yidams. Yidam is commonly translated into English as tutelary deity. You can see how they got their name by reading about them. I don't know the origin of them, but although their purpose is not that of deities, it's meant to seem like it is.

"Some things have to be believed to be seen." - Ralph Hodgson

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I consider the visualization practice that I've started to be a spiritual one, and I've gone ahead and bought a related Tibetan-Buddhist practice book (on the way) and continue to attend a Stupa that I've recently started at. If I end up with a spiritual teacher from my visualizations, all the better, though I don't think many people here have that intention in mind. Personally I do it as a conciousness discipline; I don't genuinely expect results, though one can always hope. But I don't think most people are doing this for spiritual reasons; for me it's unavoidable.

 

So, I don't see how op's "consulting Tenzin Gyatso and various Tibetan Natives" is entirely on key with what goes on here, though I am interested. They're just not related, it's merely a co-opted term. Maybe I should be looking for a Buddhist forum. My impression is that deity practices are generally rather late-term. I don't know how common, especially in dedicated form, they are either amongst the more dedicated lay people in connection with communities here in the west or the highly integrated practitioner, or natives. I'm not a Buddhism expert right now.

 

But really, I don't know what the f*** a volume on "tulpae" in connection with Tibetan practice would consist of other than a discussion of deity practice and/or mentioned Yidam, and unless there's a Mahayana that likes making secular discarnate personalities, op is just going to get odd looks from the Lama. But then he didn't give much in the way of details.

 

My understanding is that Alexandra David-Néel's creation of a "image of a jolly Friar Tuck-like monk" is not the usual practice, it just happens to be possible, and that the use of the word tulpae isn't even correct since it's only a tulpae once the image is incarnated by the given deity. But I might be wrong.

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