Jump to content

Ringgggg's somewhat-comprehensive foxgirl imposition log


ringgggg

Recommended Posts

(edited)

A quick update

 

I haven't experienced anything huge, but what I have experienced is something of an overall improvement to the presence imposition I'd done beforehand.

 

Where there used to be an undefined blob of A3 going about, there is now a marginally more pronounced form. I think I spoke on how that was one of my improvement areas in a previous entry ↓

On 6/28/2023 at 2:15 PM, ringgggg said:

A3 is in what I'd call my field of focus, but the presence I impose has always been this unfocused blob of nothingness from which I can only gather what she's doing from context clues.

 

Very minute change, but something to comment on regardless. If I had to rate my presence imposition skills from 1-10, they went from a 3.5 to a 3.7 in the span of like a couple days (which is still pretty big of an improvement in my eyes). A3 is still very much a "blob of nothingness," but at least I can see just a small amount of progress. It's not good for me to just expect things to be this recordable though, so I'll just document these little noticeable changes when I see them. For the record, it might be weeks before I notice anything of huge recordability potential. I'll do my best to keep this thread updated anyway. I don't want to miss a thing

 

Three cheers for mental sculpting

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 124
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

(edited)

I realize I may have to figure all this stuff out for myself.

 

There aren't any specific one-size-fits-all instructions on imposition, just a compilation of insights people have learned from their own experiences. Most of them seem to line up with each other when it comes to the stuff I should expect to see during the process.

 

I'm loosely following how others go about imposition (via guides and a few notable threads), but keeping what I should expect in the realm of the unknown. Let's call it semi-freehanding.

 

Decided to try imposing in dimmer spaces yesterday and it looked like there was some white flickering around where the boundaries of the form had been established. Incredibly subtle and I had to pay serious attention to notice. Don't think it could really be conclusive, though, because I had a candle going on in the background that was also flickering. Whatever.

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
(edited)

A quick update to confirm that progress is indeed progressing

 

I feel like the process should be called 'advanced presence imposition' before visuals start to form. That's truly what it feels like right now; doing pass-through after pass-through of sculpting features with my hands. I usually start sessions with the midsection/pelvis and branch off from there, which probably explains why that area is more defined.

 

Speaking of sessions, I've shrunken them down into ~30-45 minute chunks to fit everything in my schedule. There has yet to be a day where I don't do a regular session. That being said, it's been a lot easier to focus and settle into imposing. In my first couple sessions, I had to be well into the sauce (~1.5 hours) for the boundaries* of A3 to really become more prevalent. It's much easier now, which has made it the shortening of the average session not incredibly oppressive.

 

I went out with A3 to the local park for her birthday and I soon realized how tiring it was for me to impose her for a prolonged amount of time. I realize it's a skill that needs to be worked towards as much as the vividness. I like to think of vividness as how much weight you can rep while the average time you can maintain imposition is represented by the amount of reps you can do with said weight. Even with all this, I feel as if it's more important to put more effort into the visuals rather than the time. Finishing one thing and moving onto the other is the idea here. I want a foundation that I can build on top of.

 

Things are gradually starting to fall into place.

 

*I use boundaries like I'm talking about how effective the mind's eye is in representing things in the real world without actually having visuals in yet. Think of touching an invisible object. At first, you don't know where to look for different features, but as you keep on sculpting, you can gradually develop a sense of where each part is in relativity to the other. 

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
(edited)

It's August 21st, which means that I've been practicing imposition daily for a solid month now.

I can definitely say with confidence that things are very different than they were back when I started, which is enough for me to want to press on

 

On 8/10/2023 at 1:34 PM, ringgggg said:

it's been a lot easier to focus and settle into imposing. In my first couple sessions, I had to be well into the sauce (~1.5 hours) for the boundaries* of A3 to really become more prevalent. It's much easier now, which has made it the shortening of the average session not incredibly oppressive.

Firstly, it's become much easier to make the "boundaries" of A3's presence-imposed form distinctly defined. The time and energy I have to put into making these boundaries less “phantom” and more integrated with my surroundings is noticeably less. 

That’s the best diction I could come up with for that; there really isn’t an objective level of concentration or window of time for things to happen. Neither is there a word that describes it in crazy detail (which makes what I said even more arbitrary when I factor in the fact that the process varies for each person), but for all the stuff I can say conclusively, big progress = yes.

 

That’s probably why I’m relying so much on analogy when I post these updates. The things people have already experienced contain little imposition-describing building blocks that I can use to my full advantage when I attempt to describe all of this to you. Alternatively, you could just try it yourself.

 

Anyway, going back to what I said earlier about seeing results, I no longer have to be as diligent in this area of focus and can now turn my attention to making those boundaries retain their integrity the farther I get from the imposed form. I can explain that dilemma as if it were render distance in a video game, because the two are basically the same thing. With render distance, the further you move from a person or thing, the less defined it becomes, until you're looking at basically nothing. When I move further and further from A3, the same thing happens. The sense of where the "boundaries" are is lost and the form itself becomes muddled and "blurry," even though I can't actually see anything yet. I like to call what I'm experiencing "phantasmic nearsightedness," but I don’t know whether or not it has any practical ties, so let’s just use that term for the sole fact that it sounds cool.

 

I'm hoping the issue will go away with more practice and repetition so that I can impose without being as up close, but almost any roadblock in the process can go away with enough practice, which kind of makes it redundant. There's shortcuts for everything, so I'll ask around and see what comes up. @Breloomancer has been a big help for pointers. I'm very thankful to have someone to fall back on that has gone through the school of hard knocks and knows what works. Hopefully in a few months her guide comes out and I don't have to vomit out everything she's told me so far just to clarify how things work. I'm curious to know if there's anyone else on the forums who I can discuss this with, but I know I'll have to rely on my own knowledge most of the time because of how subjective interpretations of firsthand experiences are

 

Onward and upward, I guess.

 

P.S. More random sketches of A3 I did in my spare time

Spoiler

image.thumb.jpeg.cd8cda3e96ddb7a7a40e3ca95b1802e2.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.dbc264a2a0c12613d8a691f0c0b5c676.jpeg

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(edited)

Are we just gonna ignore that Projection, Spatial Visualization, and Presence Imposition all fall into the same category of practice? Jeez, we need a proper glossary update or something

 

I tried imposing in zero light while being aided by tactile imposition. There's a pitfall I had to avoid when doing that, one that I missed in my first few moments practicing. Because of the noticeable lack of visuals, I instantly turned to visualizing A3 in the mind's eye by pure force of habit; basically turning to visualization instead of projecting her onto a 3D plane.

 

After I realized my mistake, I brought in the tactile imposition (which, mind you, I have only a small amount of experience with) to better get a sense of what part of the form I'm working on. Let me tell you, it was pretty impossible to go back from there. It feels like you're feeling around in the dark for something; you gradually get a sense of where things are through the foundation that touch provides. If you touch a box in the dark, you gain a sense of where each edge is, how wide the faces are, and the texture of the corrugated cardboard. With this info, you know exactly where to place your hands in order to pick it up!

 

Zero-light "visual" imposition (no visuals included) is useful for an entirely different reason. I theorize that the reason why visual imposition is way harder than any other type is because sight is the only sense that gets a constant amount of use. A stimulus can have varying strengths when being interpreted by the body. With scent, for example, a weak stimulus would be something like stale air, and a strong sense would be something like smelling salts. With taste, it could be a faint aftertaste or a hot pepper. With sound, it could be faint ambience or Goreshit. See the pattern?

 

I'm going somewhere with this. The weaker a stimulus is that the body is sensing, the easier it is to practice imposition. You're gonna have an easier time trying to scent-impose in a well-ventilated room rather than a men's locker room. This is the reason why visual imposition is so tricky to nail; your eyes are constantly getting input taking in your surroundings. For your eyes, a low-level stimulus is a dark room, and a strong stimulus would be something like a flashbang. That's my reasoning behind doing zero-light imposition. You're taking away visual stimuli entirely, which (even when you can't see anything) makes lower light levels that much more optimal for visual imposition. The only thing you need in a zero-light environment is to know where you're imposing, which perfectly ties into what I said earlier about incorporating tactile imposition into the mix. That's my reasoning.

 

Even though zero-light imposition will only take up a fraction of my time in the process, I've had a couple examples of other people's success to go off of that shows that this is indeed worth my attention. Bre couldn't nail down visuals until she tried it, but maybe that's just celebrity endorsement. Consider it a viable option

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ringgggg said:

I theorize that the reason why visual imposition is way harder than any other type is because sight is the only sense that gets a constant amount of use.

why some senses are easier to learn than others is something that i have thought about a lot. people pretty consistently report sight to be the most difficult, followed by sound, followed by touch, taste, and smell. but is this inherent to human neurology, or is it a product of the way people conceptualize their senses? everyone i am familiar with who is practiced with imposition has a WEIRD (western, educated, industrialized, rich, democratic) cultural background and is immersed in tulpamancy, so the 'data' that exists is all biased towards certain ways of conceptualizing one's senses

 

you might be on to something with your hypothesis, but i am going to offer a slightly different perspective: maybe senses that people are more reliant on to understand their environment develop more deeply rooted perceptual sets, which makes them harder to consciously manipulate. sight is extremely important for how most people conceptualize their environment; when thinking about a place, before people think of the noises or the smells or the feel of the ground, they will think about what it looks like. because people conceptualize sight as being so important, they have a much more deeply ingrained idea of what sight should be like, and it takes more time and effort to unseat that idea. same with sound; people don't rely on sound as much as sight to understand their environment, but language is conveyed via sound, so it is extremely important for communication and relating to other people, which is why it is the second most difficult sense to learn. and then touch, taste, and smell are all things that people think about much less, so they are significantly easier to manipulate. but maybe if someone from a culture where smell was more highly valued tried to learn imposition, they would have a harder time learning to impose smell. that's just an idea though, and it would be difficult to actually test it

 

2 hours ago, ringgggg said:

The weaker a stimulus is that the body is sensing, the easier it is to practice imposition.

it isn't precisely about the amount of stimulation, but the contrast. lowering the amount of stimulation will generally also lower contrast, so you're on the right track. but it's really a result of pattern recognition systems having to extrapolate more in more ambiguous situations, and that extrapolation is influenced by imagination and expectation. the ganzfeld effect shows that being exposed to a completely uniform stimulus has identical results as sensory deprivation. and actually, when exposed to extremely strong forms of stimulation, it also becomes more difficult to sense contrast, so i would contest that it would be just as easy to impose in a pitch black room as it would be to impose after looking at a flashbang (aside from the disorientation effects of the flashbang of course)

I have a tulpa named Miela who I love very much.

 

 
"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"

-Me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Breloomancer said:

maybe senses that people are more reliant on to understand their environment develop more deeply rooted perceptual sets, which makes them harder to consciously manipulate. 

So the senses people are more used to using are harder to manipulate because they're a bigger focus?

 

I don't know about you, but it sounds to me like we're talking about the same thing with different diction. Maybe I just have a different way of explaining things, but I think the gears mesh there in quite a few places.

 

I think can see how this pans out; a deaf person relies on sight more, and a blind person relies on hearing more, which therefore elevates the importance of those respective senses to that specific person. Maybe their knowledge of how to utilize their senses becomes deeper and more adept because they're of higher focus. I'm sure a blind person can sense the proximity of a specific sound better than the average layman can.

 

Maybe then it'd be like reading a book. Senses that get less attention are like scanning a book, only understanding the key plot points, which then make the story easier to alter because there's less information to go off of. Senses that get more attention would be like reading that book five times over and knowing what the main character had for breakfast last week, which would obviously make telling an augmented version of the story waay harder. You've already been told that Character X ate waffles on Tuesday, not Wednesday.

 

19 hours ago, Breloomancer said:

it isn't precisely about the amount of stimulation, but the contrast. lowering the amount of stimulation will generally also lower contrast, so you're on the right track.

Thanks.

 

I'm not gonna use our different interpretations as an excuse to say that I was super-duper-ultra-right all along. I didn't realize I was only scratching the surface. Admittedly, there's more to the equation that I need to think about

Which is funny because you only need to "do imposition" to be able to do imposition

 

19 hours ago, Breloomancer said:

it's really a result of pattern recognition systems having to extrapolate more in more ambiguous situations

Can you clarify what you mean by 'ambiguous sensations'? I've seen that term thrown around a couple times and google is weird with it

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, ringgggg said:

I don't know about you, but it sounds to me like we're talking about the same thing with different diction. Maybe I just have a different way of explaining things, but I think the gears mesh there in quite a few places.

yeah, we mostly had the same idea, but the nuance is slightly different between the ideas we arrived on. i think

 

29 minutes ago, ringgggg said:

Can you clarify what you mean by 'ambiguous sensations'? I've seen that term thrown around a couple times and google is weird with it

ambiguous sensations are sensations that have multiple interpretations that fit the data approximately equally. so the go to examples are bistable illusions like the 'necker cube', the 'mountain or valley' illusion, or the 'yanny or laurel' illusion, where there are two very different interpretations that people can easily switch between. but ambiguous sensations can also come in a more subtle variety, like taking an eye exam and not being certain if a letter is a C or an O or a Q, or looking at someone who is severely backlit and not being certain if they are facing towards you or away from you. sensory deprivation is the ultimate type of ambiguous sensation where you are getting no sensory information at all, so your perception of your environment is based solely on internally produced ideas

I have a tulpa named Miela who I love very much.

 

 
"People put quotes in their signatures, right?"

-Me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(edited)
4 hours ago, Breloomancer said:

ambiguous sensations are sensations that have multiple interpretations that fit the data approximately equally.

Alright, so multiple different perceptions of the same thing. I think I got it.

Edited by ringgggg

D-prime is shrinking as we speak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • ringgggg changed the title to Ringgggg's somewhat-comprehensive foxgirl imposition log

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...