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How to Refocus on Your Wonderland


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(edited)

How To Refocus On Your Wonderland

 

Preface

 

For a long time I struggled with poor visualization, but what I really struggled with is how to focus on my wonderland. When I saw a blur or darkness, I didn’t know how to get a viable image. I thought I was just bad at visualizing until I realized an image came in more clearly when I took the time to illustrate it bit by bit. The tricky part was knowing how to focus on a scene and use that skill to build more elaborate constructs. I put this guide together because this method helped me in the past and it boosted my confidence in my visualization ability.

 

Summary

 

This method is about stabilizing and solidifying your focus on your wonderland by applying visualization skills in a step-by-step process. You start with visualizing a simple object and illustrate one new detail at a time. Next, you continue to repeat this method with increasingly more complex objects until you become satisfied with your visualization quality. You can also use this method to improve your visualization quality for more complex objects and multiple objects.

 

Prerequisites

 

This guide assumes you have a wonderland, but this method can also be applied to visualizing objects in a void. This guide does not require having a tulpa or previous knowledge on meditation.

 

Summary of the Visualization Skill

 

This guide expands on concepts described in Chupi’s and Nikodemos’s guides by explaining when and how to apply these skills in order to focus and achieve better visualization of your wonderland. While I will briefly explain this skill, these guides explain this skill in more detail.

 

This skill is all about looking at an object and asking yourself how it should look, feel, take up space, etc. For example, if you have grass in your wonderland, one could ask about the color of the grass, the height and shape of the blades, what species of grass it is, if it’s made out of cotton candy, the texture of the grass, how it feels when you walk in it, etc. The more questions you can answer, the more information you will have about that particular object. Thinking of questions and answering them requires your focus and having more information allows you to visualize your objects and wonderland more effectively.

 

How to Refocus on Your Wonderland: Detailed Walk-through

 

First, find a block of time and a comfortable place to sit down. Since you will be applying this skill one small step at a time, expect this to take time. Stabilizing your focus involves walking through this process slowly. Rushing can disrupt your focus and cause your visuals to blur. If you have any doubts or feel frustrated because you’re looking at a black void right now, keep in mind your visualization quality will get better. If it helps, you may want to use a relaxation breathing technique before getting started.

 

Start with taking a simple object such as a sphere or a cube. What color is the sphere? Is it smooth or bumpy? Is it soft and squishy or firm like a billiard ball? What is the temperature of the sphere? Are there any other questions that come to mind, such as how the ball reacts to gravity? Continue to illustrate more details with your simple object until you are satisfied and or bored. Once you can clearly picture your simple sphere or cube, you can move onto something more complicated.

 

A more complex object like a chair is a good next step. How tall is the chair? What is it made of? How many legs does your chair have? How stiff is the seat if you sat on it? What are the designs on this chair? A chair is a friendly object to work with because chairs are usually easy to find in most living spaces and can be used as a reference or a source of inspiration.

 

If you feel satisfied with your visualization ability at this point, congratulations! While this approach may no longer be needed to help you at this point, this process can be applied to more complicated objects and landscapes to produce a more vivid image of your wonderland.

 

If you feel like your visualization is still fuzzy or you are growing bored and restless, you may want to try again with another somewhat complex object. If the problem is you need something more interesting to look at, you may need to move onto an even more complex object.

 

For a very complex object such as a tree or your tulpa’s form, you may want to break the object into smaller parts and then visualize the object as a whole. For example, you can break up a tree into the trunk, branches, leaves, and roots. If you start with leaves, you may want to ask "What is the leaf's color?", "What shape is the leaf?", "If you squeezed a leaf in your hand, would it feel fibrous and maybe a little sticky?" Once you are satisfied with the leaf, you can move onto the next component and keep working until you have the whole tree. For your tulpa’s form, you may want to start asking yourself questions about your tulpa’s head, body, clothes, and so on. How broad or specific these groupings are is completely up to you. Once you are comfortable with visualizing each part, imagining the whole object may only require a few final questions such as "Are all of the leaves the same color?" and "How do the leaves and branches move in the wind?".

 

Breaking a complex object down into smaller sections can also be applied to visualizing multiple objects. Instead of one complex image being made up of different parts, one complex wonderland scene is made up of multiple objects. I recommend starting with a small number of less complex objects, such as a chair and a rug, and then add one object at a time.

 

Alternatively, you can do a mixture of both the original approach and a piecemeal approach by starting with very broad questions and then asking very specific questions for complex and multiple objects. For a tree, you could ask “Is this a real tree or a fantasy tree?” , "How tall is it?" , "Could you climb it if you wanted to?", "Is the season changing the colors of the leaves?" and then ask, “What shape are the tree leaves?”, “How deep do the roots go?, "How tough is the bark?”, and so on. For multiple objects, you can start with the broad questions “How many objects are there?”, “Do these objects share a common theme, such as being man made?”, “How much space do these objects take up?”, and then ask more specific questions such as “How fuzzy is this pillow”?, “How warm is this blanket?”, and so on.

 

At this point, I recommend thinking of your collection of objects as a separate room, scene, or space you can revisit. The more time you spend with a scene, the easier it is to recreate it. A wonderland scene can store a surprising amount of information as long as the rules you set are consistent. The more practice and time you invest in a scene, the more detailed your recollection will be and the easier it will be to visualize in the future.

 

Suggestions/Tips

  • If you are struggling with being bored, teleporting to a parade or a war zone can lead to you getting distracted and going back to having blurry images or a black screen. Unless you are prepared to flesh out a lot of intricate details very quickly, the task may be too overwhelming and you may start skipping details to keep up with the pace. The adrenaline rush can also break your focus. Instead of doing that, you should either move onto a more complex object or get creative and ask more interesting questions like “Is this sphere heavy enough to dent the floor of my wonderland?”.
  • If you don’t like the objects you are visualizing, why are you putting in the effort to visualize them at all? If a tree isn’t to your taste, you could also visualize furniture, a vending machine, a weapon, etc. using the same approach.
  • When visualizing multiple objects, it is okay if an object only becomes crisp when you are paying attention to it. In real life, the human brain picks one point to focus on at any given time while everything else blurs out in the peripheral vision. As long as you know where everything should be and enough about those objects to know what they should look like up close, you’re doing it right.
  • Visualizing moving objects can add another layer of complexity to make something more interesting. However, I don’t recommend loud or overwhelming objects early on because they can be distracting and downgrade your image resolution.
  • Unless you are really comfortable with what your tulpa’s form looks like or you're really eager to visualize it, I don’t recommend starting off with that. Like any other complex object, their form may be too much for you to focus on right now, but it won’t be after you build your way up to that level of complexity.
  • If your tulpa is sentient, they can guide you to look at certain things, or they may ask for you to visualize something for them. Why not, right? They may surprise you with a real treat!

In Conclusion

 

Once you feel comfortable with your visualization, have fun! Now that your visualizations are stable, go ahead and visualize exciting things like flying on dragons or shooting aliens in space. Chances are you forgot about your immediate surroundings in real life awhile ago.

 

Submitted for Guides in the [Wonderland] section.

 


 

I may continue editing my guide before the GAT decides to review it.

Old version: https://community.tulpa.info/topic/14524-how-to-refocus-on-your-wonderland-first-submission/

Pdf back-up of relaxation breathing website: Stress Management_ Breathing Exercises for Relaxation _ Michigan Medicine.pdf

 

Edited by Cat_ShadowGriffin

I actually use this as a form now, but it's not my main one. I'm still not a hippo, neither is Ranger.

I used to speak in pink and Ranger used to speak in blue (if it's unmarked and colored assume it's Ranger). He loves to chat.

 

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