arcanemagic

Teens and their tulpas

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Here is my take on the subject: Back when I started with my tulpa, I was 19 and a half. Looking back, I was extremely dumb and immature about tulpas, even though on surface I had done my research and "knew" right from wrong in regards to making a tulpa. Evidently I didn't, because after I made my first one, a few weeks passed before I went out of control, making a total of four "tulpas" within several months, of which only the first one actually survived and grew to maturity. Fortunately I recovered from my monumental stupidity sometime after my 20th birthday, and she's more or less thrived ever since.

 

It is true that a human being is not fully developed until well into his/her 20s, and I know that even now I'm still not fully done developing, but ultimately I think raw experience with tulpas or similar phenomena is a huge factor in how good of a host you are. Regardless of your age, to an extent, if you try and fail spectacularly at being a tulpa's host, as I did, then you might come away from the wreckage with an actual understanding of what it means to be creating a separate, independent ego within your head (and not just saying that you do understand, but truly having a firm grasp on the idea).

 

I can only assume the same could happen to a 14 year old with a gigantic cringeworthy harem of thirty or forty instantly-vocal, instantly-imposed anime pony waifu tulpas, and he could experience a big turnaround like anyone else with a little experience under his belt. The difficulty comes in determining whether or not someone that young is capable of total objective self-examination, and can realize when some major corrections need to be made. Maybe such a thing is possible, though it would certainly be rare, going off of my memory of myself and all of my friends at that age.

 

I consider my first six to ten months of tulpamancing to be a sort of practice run, in retrospect, and a very necessary one in my case. I was an idiot, but at least I learned from it.


"You've got to believe to achieve." -Hank Hill

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Person acting childish and irrational in a place of sensible intelligent discussion ... If someone is being irrational it's really by definition hard to reason with them

 

Problem is, he's not being irrational. He has different morals or values than you guys do. You should always try and understand why the person you're arguing with thinks the way they do, or you won't really accomplish anything.

 

It's a valid point of view that benefit isn't always worth loss, even if there's more of the prior than the latter. In this case, MrCrazy doesn't believe the possibility of people enjoying experiences with their tulpas is worth the possibility of those people abusing or abandoning them. That's not so hard to understand, is it?

 

But that's not the popular opinion because, like I said, often some loss is required for more gain. Think every war ever fought. Countries believed losing some of their population would be worth winning the war in the long run. But you can understand how someone may think it's better never to fight the war and save those lives than to gain some territory and population, right? Different values, but still logical.

 

 

This is a bit blunt, but - basically you guys are alright with the possibility of a few tulpas getting hurt at the expense of even more enjoying their newfound lives. Of course you don't think of it like that, it's more "Let come what may". MrCrazy on the other hand believes it's better for things to remain as they are, because the benefit isn't worth the harm.

 

In a mathematic sense, losing 25 and gaining 125 still profits you 100. But with human (or tulpa) emotions, it doesn't quite work like that. There's values and morals involved that complicate everything to the extreme - when multiple sets of values conflict. It's better to put it in words and consequences. Out of one hundred people being introduced to tulpas, let's say..

 

70 people may think it's interesting, but never explore it further, never make a tulpa.

25 people attempt to create tulpas, with success ranging from just being friends to greatly improving the quality of their hosts' lives.

4 people succeed in creating tulpas to varying extents, but eventually get bored of them. Those tulpas basically cease to exist, never again given consciousness to think or feel.

1 person creates a tulpa primarily for sex, and it never becomes more or less than that.

 

These numbers are ridiculously disproportionate, overly simplified and overall not realistic. But they work as an example. Take into account every result of informing these people of the tulpa phenomenon. Would you, given the choice, inform these people about tulpas?

 

Terribly inaccurate example aside, yes, most people here would. The small amount of harm isn't enough to null the overall benefits. But some people wouldn't. It's more important that no tulpa is mistreated, and those people remaining unaware is the better option.

 

 

And those are differing values. Human nature to disagree because of them. No one is "wrong" when it comes to these beliefs, though there are certainly majorities and minorities. And for reasons I ~barely covered in my last post, the majority has decided some loss is acceptable for a larger gain.

 

More importantly however, is to always take into account that what at first seems a necessary sacrifice may not be so necessary. Even if some of that benefit is lost, it's often possible to reduce said sacrifice or remove it completely. In this case, like I said, instead of informing large amounts of people with small amounts of information, you can more carefully select who and how that information is given. Think an article in a magazine versus a presentation in a college Psychology class. Also, presenting it in a way that promotes further research, rather than giving the impression all there is to be known has been stated.

 

 

It's all much more complicated than that unfortunately, but with a bit more understanding you can make better informed decisions, anyway. On the bright side, anyone who discovers this website is doing research, which is better than reading some creepypastas and 'accidentally making a murder-tulpa'. As for introducing the tulpa phenomenon to random people in real life.. You might want to be a bit selective. Try and aim that information at open-minded or generally caring people, if you can. At the very least, don't write a small article for a magazine 100,000 random people will read.


Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.

Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.

My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.

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Very insightful indeed. At first I had the knee jerk response of "waitwhatnow?" Until I continued reading.

 

Makes sense I guess - to me it seemed utterly illogical and irrational because from my point of view it struck me that anyone could surely see that this makes sense, and to not see it would be the result of a non-rational thought process.. But I suppose given a significantly different moral standpoint then yeah this would make some sort of sense... It would seem I have much to learn in the way I judge others reasoning.

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If everyone had the same moral standpoint, all arguing would be purely constructive and we'd probably have had a "perfect society" a long time ago. We also wouldn't be human as we know it.

 

Instead we have misconceptions (the bane of my existence), wars, many different religions, "good" and "evil", and arguments about the morality of our imaginary friends - all the things that make us beautifully human.


Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.

Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.

My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.

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I'm going to say something odd, I have sort of noticed with people who were originally bad hosts and became better as well as what periods in life people in the multiple community have sometimes been really shitty to their headmates. I think that for most people who would be good hosts by some point in adulthood, would have been good hosts as children. But, out of teenage years and very early adulthood, one of those periods they would not be a good host in that if they made a tulpa during that period, they would not be good. If they had a tulpa from before that, they would still be good hosts. I know with myself, early adulthood was the period that would have been bad for me to become a host, as evidenced by my reaction when my headmate separated and first made her separate presence known (in addition to being a host, I am also multiple). As such, I would be wary of introducing tulpamancy to teenagers and young adults I do not know. Ones I knew and had a sense of how they were, yes if I thought they were in the stage of life they would be a good host. Introducing it to older adults or young children, I would be a lot more comfortable.

 

- Hail


Tri = {V, O, G}, Ice and Frostbite and Breach (all formerly Hail), and others

System Name: Fall Family

Former Username: hail_fall

Contributor and administrator on a supplementary tulpamancy resource and associated forum, Tulpa.io and Tulpa.io/discuss/.

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I believe that tulpae, in many cases, are even more beneficial for teenagers than they are for adults. One might be quick to assume that emotional instability, which is somewhat common among adolescents, will lead to their tulpa being mistreated or dissipated. The reality is, a tulpa may actually be able to help their host with such things, and give them psychological support that they otherwise wouldn't have. Of course, not just anyone should attempt to create a tulpa. Depending on a person's intelligence or maturity, they may not be able to understand how to properly treat a tulpa. Most teenagers are capable of understanding this type of thing, and if not, their carelessness and laziness might prevent them from even being able to develop their tulpa into a sentient being in the first place, which means no one would have to worry about ethics in that situation.

 

Being 15 myself, I am tired of seeing people assume that no teen is capable of properly creating or treating a tulpa. It does not matter whether someone is 13 or 30, if they are mature enough to understand what tulpamancy means for their and their tulpas life, they should not be discouraged from creating one.

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From a purely physiological standpoint the brain doesn't develop it's full range of action=consequences systems until it's around 18-19 years of age at least, (studied it a bit at uni and was rather surprised at the time!) and doesn't develop out of the box reasoning and extrapolation skills properly until around age 13 onwards.

 

That said I can't see either of those being a reason as and of themselves to discourage it on a person by person basis (i.e. if Said person fits the.. Dare I say.. 'Right' mindset) - while consequential reasoning may not be 100% developed it's by no standards non existent - as demonstrated by their ability (sorry for using a generalisation and grouping you all) to discuss and debate their chosen paths and future aspirations.

 

Dare say if I was a teenager I would be doing the same thing I am now.. Only with less commitments ^^

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I see people here mention the "bad host" term and I just want to ask: what exactly makes tulpamancer bad and why would it affect teen hosts more than adults? I am sorry for spamming (if it is) but I am going to be honest here. I created my tulpa when I was 15 (she will be two years old soon) and I constantly find myself worrying whether I am "bad" or "good" host. She says it is all good, but you know, doubts have their strength.

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A bad host in my eyes would be one that essentially abuses their tulpa for purely selfish reasons like a sex slave, punching bag or just source of amusement to be thrown away when they feel so inclined. I think if you worry about being a bad host you most likely are not, on account of the worrying about it.

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