Jump to content

Linkzelda's Image Streaming Guide


Recommended Posts

Thanks for taking the time for the critique, Sands. As for the declare thing, I guess that's due to my English teachers force feeding me and my peers to use anything but "say," and "tell," so it's kind of an annoying habit in the context for this forum, I guess. I'll go over these things over the week, and give you guys an update. Thank you again for your time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 47
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Oh I think I know that one. Writers even seem to refuse to use a character's name when writing, instead coming up with five thousand different ways to refer to a certain character without just simply calling them "Bob" or "he". It's pretty weird, that. But honestly not a very good writing tip, as it tends to end up in purple prose. Which certainly is flashy, but I wouldn't call it good writing in 9 cases out of 10. This of course being something I've noticed in written fiction by amateurs, but eh...

 

But don't be afraid to use simple words. They're simple for a reason, and I'd say it's a good reason when you want your thoughts to get across easily.

The THE SUBCONCIOUS ochinchin occultists frt.sys (except Roswell because he doesn't want to be a part of it)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

Disapproved.

This guide says many things that are already handled subconsciously.

For example, in the "How to Make Your Attempts Emotionally Engaging" section, it lists locations and how you should prime yourself to feel in relation to these situations. If you're in a battlefield, chances are, you're going to be feeling the appropriate feelings without needing to attempt to consciously make yourself feel that. Sounds like a phoney way of making one feel emotional. Really a better suggestion would be to use a situation that already makes you feel a strong emotion. Perhaps a strong emotional memory.

 

>Don’t Worry About Aiming for Perfection

 

Yeah good job champ, "Don't look down" What do people always do when you tell them to not look down, they look down. Now consciously subconsciously some punk is going to rebel against you for telling them to not worry about it. For the sake of rebellious youths, change the title to something less provocative such as "Perfectionism, and alternatives."

 

This guide needs a lot of work, shorten it further if you can. People will spend so much time reading this, they won't actually be forcing. I know this from personal experience. Longer than necessary guides are the bane of a freshly starting tulpamancer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can approve this for guides now.

"Assert the supremacy of your Imaginal acts over facts and put all things in subjection to them... Nothing can take it from but your failure to persist in imagining the ideal realized."

 

-Neville Goddard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Disapproved.

This guide says many things that are already handled subconsciously.

For example, in the “How to Make Your Attempts Emotionally Engaging" section, it lists locations and how you should prime yourself to feel in relation to these situations. If you're in a battlefield, chances are, you're going to be feeling the appropriate feelings without needing to attempt to consciously make yourself feel that. Sounds like a phoney way of making one feel emotional. Really a better suggestion would be to use a situation that already makes you feel a strong emotion. Perhaps a strong emotional memory.

 

Well, to an individual that can see the underlying concepts of what to do, this would be obvious, but it's really formatted to newcomers that may take that for granted. Whatever the person uses, strong emotional memory or not, would still involve mentally preparing themselves. It's understandable that things are handled "subconsciously/unconsciously," but it's through the queries from other users in the past where what would be obvious to you is a concern they've had before.

 

 

Yeah good job champ' date=' "Don't look down" What do people always do when you tell them to not look down, they look down. Now consciously subconsciously some punk is going to rebel against you for telling them to not worry about it. For the sake of rebellious youths, change the title to something less provocative such as "Perfectionism, and alternatives."[/quote']

 

What's wrong with informing the individual that they shouldn't worry about being perfect in the sessions? It's another concern people had when they wanted to know if they should follow one exercise. That section was merely to assure to them, and hopefully see in later sections that they are free to mix things up a bit. The "don't" isn't meant to be militant about anything, though I guess it's suddenly patronizing. I guess I'm understanding about the presumption you may have about me in this circumstance. Though I'm not sure if the sarcasm on your end is actually a critique here.

 

 

Longer than necessary guides are the bane of a freshly starting tulpamancer.

 

I'm not sure if this is justification for anything. I guess it depends on how people conceptualize indolence in general. It's ironic that one would think people would spend that long reading something, and suddenly forget to force (seems more patronizing for newcomers in a way, especially when newcomers are suggested to read through guides, a lot of threads on similar concerns they have, and such that would require a lot of investment in time either way). Maybe this response of yours could be a way for individuals to mask out that their general lack of reading something that attempts to be informative, or they're just creating double standards of what's acceptable in their eyes.

 

And it's quite ironic that a 60+ page guide with several translations went through with no problems, practically absolved from nitpicking other than what I critiqued them on (probably just in-group favoritism that was a concern that some GAT members would tend to follow; it seemed what was considered "critique" was just a slap on the wrist for those individuals). And what's "longer than necessary" could be the individual not realizing that "freshly starting tulpamancers" may not necessarily have the experiential learning that you've developed in seeing the rudiments behind the guide submissions, and others in general, along with whatever methods and practices in tulpaforcing you and your host engaged in as well. And if using the table of contents, and that they can easily skip through the other explanations for the exercises wasn't prevalent, I guess this wasn't taken into consideration of the post you've made.

 

Also, I have shortened it in the past, but queries from others that requested me to expound more on certain sections is why the content there isn't condensed further. Because with the general trend with guide submissions that are too short is that they're bound to be presumed as rehashes, or copies of other guide submissions simply because the rater has the same interpretation.

 

Unless there's actually a mandate of what really is the "bane" of newcomers, especially with a concept where people will be absorbing information on how to assess things in general, it seems dogmatic to declare that "longer than necessary guides are the bane of a freshly starting tulpamancer." Especially when I've seen countless threads of newcomers wanting more out of guides as well, so I'm pretty sure investing time, like what this whole tulpa phenomenon would take, isn't suddenly going to make someone forget to force.

 

Especially when it has a step-by-step instruction, a few videos for examples, a few pointers, and such, I thought aims for more things like this were promoted (though I guess the testimonials in this thread doesn't seem to be taken into consideration, even though that would be one aspect to consider in rating). Of course, one can't generalize what people think about the guide submission, but PMs, conversations in different channels in the IRC, and other forums didn't have members making their own dogma of what's "longer than necessary."

 

 

Also, if there's a lot work needed, I can't really predict what may be bothering you, and what's going on in your head about the guide other than the contradicting statement of "longer than necessary" that's implied to be taken as an objective truth here, especially with the trend of the forum aiming to reduce the mentality of the community of having people that make less thoughtful posts. Of course, I'm more than happy to call out on your bullshit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I gotta say Morgan, if you're going to complain about the length, you're only contradicting yourself. You've approved much longer guides in the past, so either you have some agenda against Linkzelda here or you're back to your anti-guide ways. Which unfortunately won't really work when you're supposed to look at guides objectively. Or well, as well as you can, I suppose. The thing is, you have to rate all the guides equally. Just because you've relapsed into your guide-hating ways doesn't mean you suddenly can rate all the guides coming out now as a disapproval just because you think no one needs guides. Your reasons for disapproval have been very strange and bad these days. It has become a problem, as you're no longer really taking this seriously.

 

This isn't even the longest guide and Linkzelda has avoided some of his more verbose and needlessly complicated and confusing ways here for the most part. It wasn't a chore to read and a lot of the text were just examples you could easily skip if you thought you got what he was saying without those examples. Also come on Morgan, he avoided saying >subconscious in this guide so many times, stop bringing it in now...

 

The bane of newcomers is bad advice and assuming things about them and their way of learning. The truth is, they all are different. If there are no guides, they will still ask questions and get poor answers from some other new people who have had a "tulpa" for five minutes, except they think a tulpa is just a roleplaying character or something. We're here trying to find the most helpful guides so if a person thinks they need help, they can look at those instead of having to go through a ton of guides with awful English that is impossible to understand. And they're even given a chance to look through the guides that didn't get approved, if they feel like they need even more guides to read. If they decide they don't need guides then they won't pay much attention to them. Not giving them the chance to make such a decision on their own is much worse than providing them a choice. They're big kids now, they can decide stuff on their own, you know.

 

You could have claimed that this guide is redundant because there already is one image-streaming guide around and you think that one is better. That would make for a better argument than the length, when this isn't the longest guide around. But then again, this one adds things the other doesn't have, so they can supplement each other and that has been a good enough reason for us to approve two similar concepts before.

The THE SUBCONCIOUS ochinchin occultists frt.sys (except Roswell because he doesn't want to be a part of it)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Updates: Changed any form of “declare” (other than the stories) into something more appropriate (e.g. speak or state). Again, thanks for taking the time for making that critique, Sands.

 

To address some of the critique Sands mentioned, and to clarify more on concerns such as repetition, formatting, etc.:

 

Rarely have you used the word declare to actually declare something in this guide...

 

I thought it would be prevalent that it was just giving a general definition of what narration would be as an activity. It was mostly to emphasize how declare would be something where an individual would state something with confidence, which hopefully would acknowledge to newcomers that they might have to be prepared of being used to not making any breakthroughs for bit until they keep going through the motions. Kind of like imagining what it would be like when they finally make the breakthrough (e.g. vocal tulpa), but not letting that expectation be their enemy (as in they expect things to come by, and they don’t come, and they get depressed or can’t keep going strong).

 

It’s actually my fault for not (before I updated changing the word “declare) mentioning to you guys that the general overtone of the guide was kind of being some kind of picker upper to nag a bit to the reader that hard work will pay off rather than just standing there going “durp, what if my tulpa blows up from this?” I’ve had users that understood the method, but they still wanted a play-play instruction on things to reduce error (e.g. hints of perfectionism), and those cases sort of bled into the guide. Which is why with image streaming, they should just let their minds go loose, and just let things keep rolling.

 

Speaking things aloud (if you're able to do that without distracting anyone or worrying if anyone is hearing you talk to yourself or even your tulpa).

 

I'm not sure if I get this one completely. The "even your tulpa" part. Do you mean talking to even your tulpa or distracting your tulpa? The latter just sounds hilarious to me. Tupper going all NO STOP TALKING ALOUD YOU ARE DISTRACTING ME. I assume it's the former but you know' date=' it did make me stop and go "huh".[/quote']

 

Oh, the reason I put “even your tulpa” was actually referring to how one doesn’t necessarily have to imagine their tulpa for image streaming. In other words, when they’re practicing it, they’re doing it for personal development without implications of having their tulpas involved in it. It was mostly there to remind that people that worry if their tulpa will be affected by image streaming can always do it without them, and then build up into acknowledging their existence during those sessions.

 

But in no way was it implied as one’s tulpa being a distraction. I guess you could take this part of the guide as saying that newcomers who haven’t developed a tulpa as yet would be those that would feel they’re talking to themselves. And if it’s an individual that’s been at this for a while, it’s assuming good faith that they’ve already made breakthroughs in this with them having confidence that they’re speaking to someone, rather than being a bit skeptical of wondering if they’re really directing to their soon to be tulpa. I honestly tried lengthening that specific section you quoted on, but back when I was formulating the guide, I tried to make it as tl;dr as possible. Ironically, if you see some of the shit with all the trial and error guide submissions I’ve made in the past, there was always something even longer than what was posted.

 

Just wanted to mention that to anyone that may feel that I mentally dump everything all at once without taking consideration of reducing the bleeding eyes of readers.

 

 

 

On that very same list where I took that previous quote, do you have a gap between 6 and 7 for a reason?

 

Thanks for pointing that out, Google Docs likes being a jerk with converting documents. Fixed.

 

Aiming for perfection, maybe?

 

To be honest with you, when I was looking through books, e-books, etc. completely unrelated to tulpas before making the guide, they seemed to emphasize this to just get the reader to be more attentive. I know the phrasing makes me look like Captain Obvious, so to those that can get the point just like that, it seems redundant, but to others I’ve dealt with in the past that become doubtful of their potential in assessing these things, they just need a little reinforcement. Then they do some of the exercises, and they’re like “That’s all I needed to do?!?!?!” Then they hopefully developed the same, or more enthusiasm in image streaming like I did in those few months of militant training.

 

Formatting things to where I presume everyone will know what I’m thinking was out of the question. It’s just that with navigating through different forums that pick up on things like FAQman’s guides, and other older ones, I can imagine their naiveté, and how they’re gradually picking up on things that would be “why didn’t you know this by now” to people who know general concepts and such. So you as a rater, I can definitely understand why the redundancy can be a pain, because these concepts are things you can instantly pick up on. But to the (assumed as) new, uninformed, and curious newbie, captain obvious is the way to go just to reduce the chances of vagueness to them. So if you guys are seeing a repetition going on here, that’s good, because that’s the intention for newcomers to develop that sense of assurance that there can be underlying concepts that fit to different circumstances.

 

So please forgive me for making you read through those parts that are repetitious, but hopefully you know some of my general intentions. It’s done in case someone just happens to only read that guide out of nowhere on the Internet, and didn’t know crap about tulpas in general. It’s not really uncommon, at least from what I’ve been seeing, for others to read some random guide, and then pick up on others rather than the other way around with starting from this forum, and hopefully them investing time in reading submissions and threads in general. I know it seems silly, especially if I am linking to threads where the guide is submitted, but you never know how people assess new information in general.

 

The links to .info have the old title in them. While they still redirect just fine' date=' you might want to change them for a nicer look. Up to you though, really.[/quote']

 

I was kind of going through a minor conflict with not making the title too long, and figuring out how to reformat the title since I posted the guide submission in 8/5/2013. But thanks to waffles mentioning a little GAT trick with moving and shifting threads, it was resolved, but I forgot about changing those links. But it’s fixed, and thanks for mentioning that. As for the DreamViews one (even though you only referred to .info), I’m just too lazy to ask an admin over there to change the title, especially since the tulpa sub forum there is as dead as a door knob.

 

If I'm the only one who sees them then I guess it's just some weird Google docs problem on my end.

 

Yeah, when I made the guide in the past, it’s been through several word editing programs, and each had their own ways of indents, tabs, and such. One major enemy was the Open Office program, and getting that formatted for Google Docs was hell. Also, for the “enters,” those were attempts at page breaks (I used Microsoft 2013 for the manual page breaks procedure). I’ve received suggestions from waffles mostly from that entry that’s now in General discussion (the living with tulpa thing) to use that.

 

So what I used a page break for sentences I didn’t want to be left alone on the next page, it kind of shifts anything at the bottom downwards as well, so this may be why things look a bit weird for you there.

 

"Contents at a Glance & What You Will Learn in This Guide" title comes right after Disclaimer and is at the end of the page with just one line of text under it' date=' I think it would just be better to push it to the next place. You have enough room.[/quote']

 

I was worried about doing any enter on Google Docs honestly, but yeah, I do have room, so I shifted them down as well.

Similar thing with "Music Association Exercise Video Examples" with the last Youtube link' date=' it's the only one pushed to the second page and you should probably remove some enters above the title to at least make the link be on the same page.[/quote']

 

I tried bringing things up, but it seemed that link just isn’t able to be on the same page. So I hyperlinked it to a new “here."

 

oFLQ36T.png

 

The comma before "you may" is misplaced' date=' there's a space in front of it and none after. Minor fix.[/quote']

 

Fixed.

 

ySlKkXp.png

 

This is a title and seeing how you have capitalized titles in this guide' date=' why isn't behind capitalized as well?[/quote']

 

Fixed.

 

This is another title that doesn't follow your set rules' date=' at first I thought it was supposed to be something minor and you wanted to type those titles out this way, but this is the only one done this way.[/quote']

Ditto.

 

Ah, for these, I wanted to make a small title for each (but would still intend to follow the general section) to keep the central theme obvious for the reader. It’s because if I tried to combine those little tidbits together, the reader might thinking I’m just rambling on. I noticed this from the previous criticism from the “Living with Tulpas” submission where people thought I was going on and on. So this way, this hopefully lets them see the information differently (e.g. “okay, so this next section involves this central idea” instead of “um what is this guy trying to get at here?”).

 

It saves a bit (hopefully) of a hassle for those who may be militant on conciseness for each thought specified, and for those who may not have much concentration unless the information is broken down. I tried to make a compromise by doing this, even though at first glance it seems kind of petty to make those little titles.

 

Why capitalize into?

 

Fixed.

 

Capitalization is a bit off on don't here' date=' though maybe it's for emphasis because of the caps on do...?[/quote']

 

Exactly, but I went ahead and capitalized the “Don’t.”

 

I'm not going to bother pointing out every single comma I think is unnecessary as they haven't made anything unreadable, but I think the one before or is really unnecessary here. No need to put it in lists like these, yeah?

 

I’m a victim of the FANBOY mnemonic for conjunctions, but I went ahead and deleted the comma there.

 

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm

 

I’m also a victim of grammar nazi professors at university, and AP English and History courses I used to take in High School. Didn’t really derp as much with commas compared to this guide entry, but it did make a difference in getting a 98, or a 103 for an essay rather than a 50 because I didn’t conform to that particular professor’s grammar and spelling guidelines. Sorry, just had to add that to acknowledge you that I know how these small comma things can intimidate you, but I am going through trial and error to know some of the reasoning behind the GAT grammar and spelling guideline, and being a bit looser on those commas.

 

On your little list here' date=' powerful creatures is the only one breaking the style of capitalization. Creatures should be capitalized too, yeah? [/quote']

 

Fixed.

 

Ihbqz37.png

 

On the chapter "Spontaneous World Exercise" and the few after it' date=' the font is changed from Calibri to Times New Roman. Same happens with "Music Association Exercise Video Examples". I suggest you change the font to the one you use elsewhere. Also waffles, I didn't even check the names of the fonts to see if I got them right. If I got them right, you owe me a drink or something.[/quote']

 

Right on the dot on the names of the fonts used. Also, fixed them to Calibri for the sections you mentioned, thanks for pointing the sudden change from before.

 

This one line of text doesn't have italics on it even though the ones before it do, and I'm pretty sure it's a part of the same story and should look the same. Am I wrong?

 

I’m kind of wondering about the original intention of doing this myself. OH, when I did the italicized portion of the story, I usually did that (breaking off from italics) as a habit that I’m not engaging in trying to image stream anymore. Sorry, minor thing I forgot to edit out. Maybe I should explain that the reader could do that if they wanted to in order to make an unconscious habit that they’ll get themselves out of that state with image streaming. But to save the submission from more words, I’ll just italicize that part.

 

Anyways' date=' I'm not going to check every single link in case they're working/good/not adware like you apparently had a problem with that, so I can't say anything about them.[/quote']

 

Ha-ha. Yeah, sorry for the inconvenience of that past event. It didn’t’ seem like other users had that issue, and I was wondering if the individual just happened to download something else that led to their presumption that it was adware. But the link with the Free Countdown Timer is a different program from the one in the older version of the guide submission.

 

If there were other grammar derps or typos then I guess I managed to miss them or forget about them already' date=' sorry.[/quote']

 

No need to apologize. This was perfect, thanks Sands. Too bad I'm not legal (by one year) enough to give you a drink through Paypal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's better than before. I approve. That said I have a few minor points for you.

 

 

 

I still feel like this guide has a weird structure. You spend a lot of the guide talking about "these exercises" before you actually give us the exercises. You should really put the exercises first so that we know what you're talking about when you say "don't self-censor and run in circles".

 

 

 

On the subject of the exercises I have two more things to say.

 

Firstly, this may sound obvious but you should just mention, if only in passing, "do this while image streaming". You give us a step-by-step for each so I was surprised when you didn't mention anything about that.

 

Secondly, use page breaks or resize your headings some more. The difference between 13 and 12 pt font is not great enough to easily tell the difference.

 

 

 

Image Streaming & The Theory Behind It

 

Image Streaming, coined by Win Wenger, involves going through mental exercises to augment your visualization skills, and being able to build mental rapport with aspects of your mind in finding solutions for many problems.

 

I have a problem with this section. You do tell us what image streaming is, but not enough. You've said that it's doing exercises to improve visualisation - okay, well, so is every other visualisation guide. And with the problem-solving, I'm not sure that it's relevant to tulpa purposes.

 

The first link tells me that "the key is to examine and describe it aloud, in as rich detail as possible...", which is exactly what you should be writing in your first sentence. That page does dive pretty much straight in though, and that quote is in the third paragraph. The second link isn't clickable by the way.

 

That might sound a bit nitpicky, and it is. But you should just make it clear from the start that you're talking about describing your mental imagery out loud (or otherwise) to make it more vivid. That's the basic concept here and there's no reason why you shouldn't just come out and state it.

 

 

 

The idea behind narration is to get yourself in the mannerisms of going through the motions to get accustomed to speaking to your tulpa

 

I'm not going to pick out every clumsy sentence but this one is a golden example. The idea behind narration is to get accustomed to speaking to your tulpa. What you've written isn't quite nonsense but it's tremendously redundant at least.

 

 

 

The importance of timing yourself in these exercises is to get accustomed in thinking quickly

 

Last time I promise, but you get 'accustomed to', rather than 'accustomed in'. I'm really not going to pick up every grammar mistake for you, and really these are pretty minor. But I'll let you know that there are some around, with some inconsistent capitalisation that you didn't listen to Sands about.

 

"Listen to Music if you can" is not a good title. Either capitalise it all or don't capitalise the "music". The way it is now is German, capitalising the nouns.

 

 

 

So just a bit more clarification here and there, and a REAL proofread. A REAL one, Linkzelda.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, about the parts with the titles, and the capitalization, some parts where Sands mentioned why I capitalized things such as “Into” for example is one I lower-cased. Then I’m getting a response from you that mostly likely pertains to capitalizing those parts again. I did read what Sands said, but it was clear he mentioned that some of the nitpicking could be ignored, but I went ahead and just did what was suggested either way.

 

Now, for the page breaks, when I did the suggestions from Sands to move things up a bit, because I had more room for example, I guess you (waffles) aren’t seeing the page breaks at all. Though I’m sure I used the manual page breaks specifically to prevent a link that would tie into a section on the previous page from happening. So if there’s any sentences that seem to be misplaced into the new page, it’s most likely that I tried to shift it up, down, or use a page break, but it starts creating a ripple effect in screwing over the page breaks I did for the rest.

 

I’m literally going to use the godly powers of Microsoft 2013 for a spelling & grammar check right now, and I will post pictures for your convenience to see how some of the suggestions may be contradicting here and there. I guess when you mentioned things like German, I guess grammar and spelling is completely different compared to American standards, so forgive me for not being aware of this (the distinction).

 

Okay, so I downloaded the guide submission prior to planning to reconsider the suggestions you’ve made waffles. I’m glad that the critique is mostly just minor grammar errors and such rather than not getting the whole guide in general, so at least I’m getting somewhere with you guys. Anyway:

 

duIiDDW.png

leGO2pK.png

 

Okay, before I had “The” lower-cased to “the,” but suggestions from before were to capitalize some of these parts. Now, I know it states “Capitalize words that begin a sentence, or are part of a title, name or place,” but from suggestions from Sands, I’ll leave it be.

 

Same for “Behind” and “behind”

gMMHfpZ.png

yiZVcO9.png

 

“Yourself” and “yourself”

 

LggwdGs.png

zr9WJFT.png

 

 

And that was literally all the power Microsoft 2013 could muster (excluding the word “tulpa” and content in the stories that were probably typed at 110-120 words per minute):

 

pzN8rLG.png

 

Just wanted to post those pictures as a reference.

 

I still feel like this guide has a weird structure. You spend a lot of the guide talking about "these exercises" before you actually give us the exercises. You should really put the exercises first so that we know what you're talking about when you say "don't self-censor and run in circles".

 

In the older version of the guide submission, I had it the way you’re most likely suggesting to me to do (shifting those tidbits at the bottom of the exercise once the user reads the exercises). However, it seemed from the older critique you made, that kind of formatting was weird as well. But seeing things are different now, I’ll try to reformat those parts during my time off from work tomorrow, but further points below I mentioned should be taken into consideration as well.

 

Firstly' date=' this may sound obvious but you should just mention, if only in passing, "do this while image streaming". You give us a step-by-step for each so I was surprised when you didn't mention anything about that.[/quote']

 

About that, if I do it in passing, would you suggest for me to integrate that for each exercise? Or to mention it for the first to prevent redundancy? Just wanted to know before any action on this part is taken. Because I wouldn’t want to get mayo to give me a “No shit Sherlock” for doing this suggestion.

 

In fact, I’d agree with mayo if he/she were to say that, because the exercises is already implied to be part of what image streaming is. And for the next point you mentioned, I’ll expound a bit more on why I didn’t do the things that would seem practical in this case.

 

Secondly' date=' use page breaks or resize your headings some more. The difference between 13 and 12 pt font is not great enough to easily tell the difference.[/quote']

 

I’m sure I used page breaks, and it’s probably how things are seen at your end. So I’ll reconsider on resizing the headings a bit more instead tomorrow, or the other days I’m off for this week.

 

I have a problem with this section. You do tell us what image streaming is' date=' but not enough. You've said that it's doing exercises to improve visualisation - okay, well, so is every other visualisation guide. And with the problem-solving, I'm not sure that it's relevant to tulpa purposes.[/quote']

 

Yeah, I agree that the problem-solving part was irrelevant. Though honestly, from personal experience, I do find that going through the activity of image streaming does make me aware of why certain mental imagery could really be hiding an underlying problem (e.g. how my tulpas may try to address certain concerns they may have, or just other real life situations I may tackle like anyone else). I wanted to expound more on why this would be significant in tulpa forcing, but I felt I should’ve kept the original definition I was paraphrasing from the other link intact.

 

The first link tells me that "the key is to examine and describe it aloud, in as rich detail as possible...", which is exactly what you should be writing in your first sentence. That page does dive pretty much straight in though, and that quote is in the third paragraph. The second link isn't clickable by the way.

 

That might sound a bit nitpicky, and it is. But you should just make it clear from the start that you're talking about describing your mental imagery out loud (or otherwise) to make it more vivid. That's the basic concept here and there's no reason why you shouldn't just come out and state it.

 

I understand the speaking aloud part, and this concern of yours also ties with the suggestion on the formatting of the guide. When I mentioned the theory behind image streaming, I wanted to give generalized info to prevent it from being a literal copy-cat from the original source. Of course, I can easily do citations and all, but that felt kind of unnecessary when I could just give generic info, and a few links for those that would be interested in the more detailed approach; it was mostly to just save some words honestly.

 

So the part on “Should You Type, Speak or Write Things Out in These Exercises?” clearly states that one doesn’t have to limit themselves to the original premise behind image streaming (e.g. speaking aloud), because I took into consideration that people may be fearful of talking to themselves for hours on end, and people wondering why they’re doing so in the first place. This is why the list with the 7 routes one could take when attempting image streaming was just a few sections away from the theory. So it’s agreeable that it would be pragmatic to shift these tidbits to the bottom of the exercises, but at the same time, it would address why a detailed exposition on the theory of image streaming isn’t needed. It’s simply because the guide is meant to derive from the concept of image streaming, and not really become a copycat, or following the rudiments to absolute law.

 

I guess you could say those tidbits that seem weird before the exercises is just prepping the reader to know some concerns they may have in advance rather than later on in the guide. In short, those sections are just giving the readers more options on what to do before they get the implication that they HAVE to speak aloud instead of using something like their mind voice for instance. It reduces negative connotations where the reader may think that I’m telling them to DO THIS OR ELSE YOU’RE NOT IMAGE STREAMING.

 

So maybe I could either:

 

- Shift everything except the “Should you type…” section to the bottom of the exercises (since I feel that part is needed to expound more from the generic definition I gave)

 

- Shift everything down, but also have to expound more (thus using more words) on the image streaming part. But honestly, the guide really is just making exercises deriving from the concept, and with the links posted, I don’t think it’s stifling too much potential for the reader if they don’t see that information. All the more incentive for them to see the more detailed and original approach if they’re really that thirsty for knowledge on the concept.

 

I'm not going to pick out every clumsy sentence but this one is a golden example. The idea behind narration is to get accustomed to speaking to your tulpa. What you've written isn't quite nonsense but it's tremendously redundant at least.

 

Right, I can see the reverse paramedic method just begging to be used for that section you quoted. Duly noted for tomorrow, or any other days I have off work for this week.

 

Last time I promise' date=' but you get 'accustomed to', rather than 'accustomed in'. I'm really not going to pick up every grammar mistake for you, and really these are pretty minor. But I'll let you know that there are some around, with some inconsistent capitalisation that you didn't listen to Sands about.[/quote']

 

I’m presuming you’re talking about “accustomed to” in general, and I changed the “accustomed in” for that quote you responded on to “accustomed to.” Since there were only 3 instances where I used “accustomed,” I only had to change the one with the “in” next to it to “to.”

 

As for the part on capitalization, I did read what he suggested, but for those parts, especially the “Allow Your Personal Stories to Ease into Your Sessions,” he was wondering if the “Into” I had before shouldn’t really be capitalized here. Unless he edited his post before the time of this one, it was pretty easy to follow his suggestions here.

 

But for the suggestion on either capitalizing all of “Listen to Music if you can,” or not capitalizing the “music,” the overwhelming knowledge of Microsoft 2013 suggests that one should go ahead and capitalize those certain parts, but it didn’t really seem to suggest that for this title when doing the grammar and spelling check. Now, minor jest aside on the all-knowing Microsoft Word, I know it’s not going to cover everything of course.

 

But again, it seems most of the suggestions is just minor differences in grammar and spelling, especially since “capitalize” would be used more often here where I reside than “capitalise” where Microsoft Word 2013 gets a hissy-fit on me.

 

Proof of said hissy-fit here:

 

LMk6h4F.png

 

I know it’s just semantics at this point, but yeah, don’t think those aspects will stifle the readability here. But just wanted to point out that both your critiques do have some subtle differences, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t good though. But again, will wait for your response, and start doing some of the suggestions tomorrow, or other days I have off from work. Thanks for the proofread, though most of it is just a few instances, rather than the whole guide being filled with them thankfully.

 

 

 

 

 

____

 

Edit:

 

Also, for the second link you mentioned, it was clickable for me. Maybe it could be an issue on your end, though if others are getting similar problems, I'll try to fix it somehow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now, for the page breaks, when I did the suggestions from Sands to move things up a bit, because I had more room for example, I guess you (waffles) aren’t seeing the page breaks at all. Though I’m sure I used the manual page breaks specifically to prevent a link that would tie into a section on the previous page from happening. So if there’s any sentences that seem to be misplaced into the new page, it’s most likely that I tried to shift it up, down, or use a page break, but it starts creating a ripple effect in screwing over the page breaks I did for the rest.

 

You use page breaks so that there isn't any shunting like that. Image here is what I'm seeing (wrong). I actually went and copied the "Exercises" section into an editor and I'm not seeing any page break characters there. It might be something on my end but I've never had any problems viewing page breaks before.

 

 

 

I’m literally going to use the godly powers of Microsoft 2013 for a spelling & grammar check right now

 

I said

and a REAL proofread. A REAL one, Linkzelda

for a reason. Yes, MS Word misled you, yes, your paper is ruined because spellcheck is in Swahili and you pressed "Change All". Word knows nothing about proper header style and many corrections it gives you are wrong. Here is a nice page which says under section 6, "Must be capitalised: [...] pronouns" - a category which definitely includes 'yourself'.

 

If I had to guess as to why Word gives you that correction, it is because it does not know that the sentence is a title. It will accept "Specific", "Emotion" and so on as proper nouns but refuses to accept that someone or something could be called "Yourself", because it is usually a pronoun. So it will righteously, wrongly, correct you because it's stupid.

 

 

 

I guess when you mentioned things like German, I guess grammar and spelling is completely different compared to American standards, so forgive me for not being aware of this (the distinction).

 

I wouldn't pay much attention to German standards of English style, but in this case your style is wrong in all British and American standards.

 

 

 

Okay, before I had “The” lower-cased to “the,” but suggestions from before were to capitalize some of these parts. Now, I know it states “Capitalize words that begin a sentence, or are part of a title, name or place,” but from suggestions from Sands, I’ll leave it be.

 

Heaven forbid that Sands is wrong; perhaps he was telling you to capitalise "behind". Now, that in itself is a matter of contention. Some styles have you never capitalising adpositions, while others have you capitalising only long ones like "behind". Which one you pick is a matter of choice, as long as you are consistent. I recommend the latter.

 

However, the "the" there should definitely not be uppercase. On that there is no disagreement and Word is actually right to correct you there.

 

As a side note I think your use of the ampersand in your titles to be in poor taste. Most authoritative sources will tell you that it should really be used as an abbreviation (where space is limited, or where the rest of the phrase is also abbreviated), or to denote collaboration (businesses are included here). Your titles are neither.

 

 

 

About that, if I do it in passing, would you suggest for me to integrate that for each exercise? Or to mention it for the first to prevent redundancy?

 

I agree that it might be a bit unnecessary to plough the field about it, so maybe an "Of course you should be image streaming your visualisations in all of these exercises" in the little paragraph under "Exercises".

 

 

 

it was mostly to just save some words honestly.

 

Who is this and what have you done with Linkzelda.

 

Actually, the "Should You Type..." section is fine where it is. Of your options I'd opt for the former. But I'd still rather you modified your original explanation a bit. It doesn't have to be any longer, just a bit clearer like I said.

 

 

 

But for the suggestion on either capitalizing all of “Listen to Music if you can,” or not capitalizing the “music,” the overwhelming knowledge of Microsoft 2013 suggests that one should go ahead and capitalize those certain parts, but it didn’t really seem to suggest that for this title when doing the grammar and spelling check. Now, minor jest aside on the all-knowing Microsoft Word, I know it’s not going to cover everything of course.

 

The correct capitalisation for that title is "Listen to Music If You Can". First and last words capitalised. Nouns, pronouns and verbs are capitalised. The only contentions are 'to' - it's a short preposition, so don't capitalise - and 'if' - it's a subordinate conjunction so most styles will have it capitalised. Don't get confused: coordinating conjunctions aren't capitalised but subordinating ones are.

 

 

 

But again, it seems most of the suggestions is just minor differences in grammar and spelling, especially since “capitalize” would be used more often here where I reside than “capitalise” where Microsoft Word 2013 gets a hissy-fit on me.

 

That shouldn't really come as a surprise to you if your spell check is set to US English. Actually, I've never complained about you using American spellings or styles. Some of your practices might be condoned by some style guides (though I doubt that's the case for most) but American style guides differ as much from each other as from British ones.

 

 

 

I know it’s just semantics at this point, but yeah, don’t think those aspects will stifle the readability here.

 

Now, I apologise to all readers here. Those with a weak heart may want to close the page now.

What we're discussing isn't semantics. We're getting at your for your bad grammar and style. What you just read was a semantic point.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Reisen
      Guided meditations often have someone lead you through a walk in the forest or along the beach or some such, effectively describing an environment for you to visualize with words. They might even add natural sounds to help. But for a lot of people, that sort of thing feels too weird, or otherwise uncomfortable. In the context of practicing visualization, there's really no reason someone has to specifically guide you through it - intentionally, at least.
       
      Guided visualization can be as simple as closing your eyes while watching a Youtube video. Any type of video you're comfortable with really, but in our case, we do best with video game let's plays. As an example, we are intimately familiar with Super Mario 64, and are a big fan of the Game Grumps, and their let's play of it. Crude language warning, if you decide to watch them. Earlier I spent 40 minutes 'watching' the first three episodes, except I had my eyes closed. Just based on the game's sounds, and sometimes the grumps' reactions, I visualized what I thought was going on in my mind the entire time. Sometimes I opened my eyes for a moment just to check what was actually going on, and understandably was off by a bit. But there's nothing wrong with that, all that matters is that you're practicing visualization! You can almost forget you're even doing it for practice and treat it like a game, for fun. You may want to find a less chatty let's player if you have trouble filtering out their conversations though.
       
      Or you know, don't even watch a let's player. I would say the possibilities for this are pretty much endless. For video games, it may help to actually be familiar with the game you're trying to imagine (though I suppose you could also try it blind). But for anything dealing more with "real life", all you need is your imagination. You probably won't be visualizing what's actually going on very accurately, but again, that's not the goal. If you want to be more accurate, open your eyes/check the video every so often. It's not cheating, and if you have particularly poor visualization it might help give you something to work with. In the case of video games it'll probably end up being a necessity to stay in the same place as the video, but that's fine.
       
      Other examples of videos that may "guide your visualization" include sports (play-by-play announcers help a ton), TV shows or cartoons/anime (again being familiar with them can help, or you can go in blind), perhaps how-to style videos where someone details what they're doing every step of the way, and really anything else where either the talking or the environmental sounds provide enough information to form a continuous mental image.
       
      It probably goes without saying that audiobooks (or just generally books being read aloud) are the epitome of guided visualizations that aren't directly telling you to imagine something. I'm not sponsored by Audible though, so I definitely won't tell you to check out that site. But most big Youtubers will, and come with some kind of discount too.
       
      Lastly, I want to note that you don't have to be sitting in front of a screen to listen to a video, nor do your eyes have to be closed. You can download an MP3 of a Youtube video (or just play it) and put it on your ipod/phone and take it with you, perhaps on a walk. You can also practice open-eye visualization by simply not looking at the source of whatever you're listening to, perhaps on a walk. Seems like that would take quite a lot of focus however, so sitting down in front of a screen might be better if you can't get sufficient visuals in whatever activity you do with it. In the end, all that matters is there's a picture in your mind. Accuracy and content are only as important as you want them to be.
       
      Good luck! Aside from wonderlanding, this is the only visualization practice we've ever done. Ours is too poor for more standalone methods, and that's why I thought of this one.
    • By sushi
      In the past I've put art guides in the art forum, but this is art aimed at playing a trick on your mind, so I think it fits the guide section better.
       
      So you have a form for your tulpa, but it's difficult to visualize because you have no reference images? Then this is the guide for you.
       
      Example pictures (NSFW!):
       
       
      Why are there naked people in my guide? To that, I can only answer: Why doesn't everyone have naked people in their guides?
       
      Actually, these people aren't naked. See?
       
       
      This technique comes from Japan, where it's known as 水玉コラ (Mizutama Kora) or "Bubble Collage". It works because your brain is so good at filling in missing information that it does it automatically. It's how you can (sometimes) understand what the other person is saying when their cell phone is breaking up, or how you can piece together that the shopping list is asking for "a dozen eggs" even though in your girlfriend's handwriting Gs look like Ws.
       
      And of course because this is the internet, this interesting illusion has been used almost entirely for porn.
       
      Well, let's divorce it from porn now. Here's how you can use the same technique to help you visualize your tulpa.
       
      Take a look at this woman:
       

       
      Would you believe that she's really six women stitched together like Frakenstein's monster?
       
      Well yeah, probably, because you're reading a guide about that, and also there are differences in skin tone and the pieces don't always fit together quite right, and also I showed too much of that one elbow. But this was a rush job so that I'd have an example for the guide, and the point is that at first glance, she looks like a normal person.
       
      The bubbles were obviously added by bubbleimage.net. She should really have a bubble separating her face from her hair, because they're from two different sources, but they blended together well enough that I didn't feel like I needed it.
       
      Here's what she looked like before the bubbles:
       
      [hidden][/hidden]
       
      That image was put together with Pixlr Express using only the "Add image" and "History" tools. I'm sure you can do better if you want to used paid apps like Photoshop, or if you wanted to learn to use more than two tools, but I wanted to show how this can be done easy and free.
       
      And here's what she looked like before that: 123456
       
      As always, I use Shutterstock for stock images because it allows you to search by model, for when you find a model you like, but you need her in a different pose or in different clothes. Shutterstock does have watermarks on the images, but you can usually avoid them -- I cut all the watermarks out of my example, except the one on her pants (and a little bit in her hair). I'm sure I could have found a good photo of pants without a watermark on them, but I took the lazy way out.
    • By Nikodemos
      So, another visualization guide, meant for those who have difficulties seeing anything at all with their mind's eye. It is quite simple and involves using actual physical objects.
       
      First, pick up an object. It can be a marble, a tennis ball, a Rubik's cube, your piggy bank or anything similar as long as it's relatively simple in shape and fits in your hands. Once you have found an appropriate object, start to examine it thoroughly, feel it's bumps, dips and texture, listen to the voices it makes, smell it's scent, see how it fits in your hand. Do this for as long as you need to in order to have a good feel of it. Once you're done with that, stretch out your arms forward in a way that you can see your object without looking down. Remember where that object and your arms are located in your vision, and close your eyes. Next, start imagining that objects, it's bumps, dips and other properties in the same place in your mind's eye, along with your hands alternatively.
       
      You should see something, the edges of the object, the color of the object or even a fully imagined, 3D object. Repeat this process a few times a day until you can see it clearly. When you have a solid feel for the object, next you should try and manipulate it. Roll it, twist it, squeeze it, anything you can do with your hands, whilst keeping your eyes closed and simply imagining how your manipulation affects the object. Opening your eyes occasionally to see how close you got to the real object looks like when you manipulated it physically with your hands.
       
      Once you feel like you have mastered this, the next step would be to do these exact same things, but not using as many senses this time. You could place it on a table and simply look at it, then visualize it in your minds eye again, moving and manipulating it. Keep this up, gradually moving to more complex shaped objects, until you are able to simply imagine all the objects you want within your minds eye without external input.
       
      This is meant as a guide to practice visualization, and it should help yoh visualize objects better. It worked for me, and I hope it works for you too. Any questions you have regarding this guide, feel free to contact me and ask. Good luck!
       
      -Niko
       
      TL;DR: Get as many senses as possible to visualizing objects, such as touch smell, hearing etc. Gradually work yourself to not needing senses for visualizing in your wonderland.
    • By Squir
      This is a technique that I found helpful, and I think it'd help people whether they're good or not at visualization. Visualization can easily get really vivid for me, and this should be a good way for building up details. This should also work for lucid dreams. This involves your dreamworld, so just basically imagine yourself doing stuff in an imaginary place to start off with.
       
      Imagine a huge computer/television screen in your dreamworld, possibly like a huge magical wall stretching off infinitely wide, or whatever comes most naturally. Imagine your Tulpa being drawn on the screen. This is normally easier than imagining them in "thin air", because it's more logical to see them in a "picture". Start with the most basic, low-quality picture you can think of, and gradually increase the quality by reading/thinking details "into" your tulpa, like refining a drawing or loading a video/JPEG, except knowing that you're downloading it from your dreamworld. This step is useful because it can start from practically 0 detail, and it can show visualization progress.
       
      Gradually imagine them like a digital model in a 3D program, rotating either them or the "camera" of the screen. Imagine lighting, the way light wind would sway their hair/clothes, and their weight on the ground. Imagine them just being there, giving them a (pleasant) interesting environment.
       
      Gradually imagine yourself importing sentience/AI into your tulpa in the "program", by imagining how they interact with their world, by imagining if they look back at you through the "screen", and imagining their response. If needed, have your information written in a list and read it "into" them like a programmer. Gradually increase the number of interactions they have with the world, situations and stuff they interact with. Throw in a pillow or something.
       
      Focus on making it feel like an interactive Youtube video, gradually increasing quality. Focus on all the steps above, then eventually reach your arms and hands into the screen in your mind. It can be invisible or visible, but it needs to be "your" hands. If your tulpa lets you touch them, do so, feeling them from top to bottom, every part that isn't awkward/distracting to touch. They should be reacting to your touch. Then, ask them to touch your arms and hands. Feel their hands on your skin, how they react to your touch. This type of interaction is actually very useful, since it convinces your mind that there's actual touch, actual events going on. Try things like poking their nose, etc.
       
      Once you get good with this, let the screen fade away, to where your whole body is a (possibly invisible) digital avatar in the same dreamworld level your tulpa is in. Interact with things the same ways your tulpa would, such as actually bending down to pick things up, in the presence of your tulpa. This will immerse you into the mindset that your tulpa is in, giving your mind information on how your tulpa thinks, since your tulpa will have to "imitate" your real world's physics when being imposed into it.
       
      Then start putting them into reality that same way, since your mind will have learned how to "impose", and use real life situations instead of fictional ones. Hope this helps.
       
      TLDR: Imagine a computer, imagine them into the screen, and start from there. Then start imagining them into reality the same way.
    • By devano
      I have read through a few blogs today and talked to a few of the users on the IRC channel to find out a common problem is that some are just not able to render their entire tulpa. They are only able to render a portion of the body, face, torso or legs. i learned a exercise during art school that helped us render entire images in our heads without forgetting bits, distorting portions or mixing things up.
       

      Take a look at this picture above and pay close attention to the lamp pole that has the cross walk signs on it.
      I want you to study this pole as best as you can. Try and study the stain right below the Hand stop sign. The bolts and everything about it. Now take about 10 minutes and think about this pole with your eyes closed. Only this pole.
      Try and cutoff other all other information from your brain such as how your day was or any other distraction. Its ok if you talk to yourself about the pole, I did this. "This pole is tall and dark. I see the red hand and the blackness next to it". As long as your focus remains on this single object.  You will need to focus on this pole for an average of 10 minutes about five times.  Be sure to examine the photo in between exercises. This process should Last you a day or two. You can attempt to do this first step all in an hour or half a day. This will not work. I don't know why, it just doesnt.
       
      now that you have completed the first step of memorizing the pole with the red hand sign start to examine the sidewalk. Only the sidewalk, ignore the trees, garbage bin and  all other objects on this sidewalk. If it helps you go ahead and imagine a flat concrete area where the building should be. focus on the edge front of the sidewalk and study this in as much detail as you have the pole. This process will take much much longer than the first step. Now close your eyes and do the same that you did with the pole but try and render the sidewalk as well. Keep both objects in as much detail as you can. You will have trouble focusing on tiny details such as where the paint has eroded on the sidewalk or the bolts on the pole. Focus on what you can and Render what you can. This will take much more than five or ten minutes. Spend at least fifteen to twenty minute each exercise. This time instead of doing it X many times you must do this until you can fully render the sidewalk and pole. This step may take three days to an entire week. Do not give up! Learning this can be far more useful than just visualizing your tulpa!
       
      Now rinse and repeat this step through the entire photo adding more and more objects each time. You can take your time by adding one object each session or you can add several objects during each session. The end result should you being able to Render that entire photo in your mind with ease. This first photo may of taken you up to two to three months to render. That is ok. Now I want you to find a new photo and do the same thing. It should be exponentially easier than the first. Your mind is already starting to examine and visualize multiple things at once. Not only are you able to render things better in your mind but your visual memorization has increased exponentially.
       
      i rushed this a bit and I will rewrite some bits of this later.
×
×
  • Create New...