Jump to content

[Misc] Why doesn't everyone have a tulpa


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Because a lot of people do not have to resort to tulpas for what they want, or just simply do not care for an "imaginary friend". Honestly, it is both a lack of understanding and a lack of necessity.

"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." -Aristotle

 

"When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -Marcus Aurelius

 

“Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” -Neil Gaiman

 

"The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried." -Stephen McCranie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 28
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Because it takes time and efforts, and people these days don't like to make efforts.

 

Because a lot of tulpamancers, well, more mature ones, have tight schedules. Most adults barely have any time for their loved ones, and tulpamancy can be a brain-draining procedure. The way I personally force is that I make my tulpas go through certain aptitude tests every few days, try to work on them as much as I possibly can. This process can take up hours of my time, and some folks may not have the same kind of availability.

 

The premise here that a lot of tulpamancers got is that 'I could have anything by my side.' This goes for form, traits and the likes. But, with time, tulpas deviate, as we all know, from their original planning. Some people might not feel okay with sudden changes like that due to having the vision that tulpas are not their own people.

 

Because tulpamancy can induce headaches and may creep out some people upon establishing first contact with their tulpas.

 

Because some people cannot take the doubt in tulpamancy.

 

Because not only does it require time, but also immense amounts of attention and caring.

 

Because you may need to do 'maintenance' on your tulpa's capacities in the long run. Because you may be afraid of what the future has to present of good and bad. Because tulpamancy challenges the concept of individualism.

 

Everyone's mind functions in different ways, different views, different perception... a few of the above may be enough to scare off any newbies!

 

If it were possible to "like" a comment, I'd like this at least three times. There are so many reasons why everyone doesn't have a tulpa—heck, we're still trying to figure out how our own consciousness works, let alone the possibility of more than one inhabiting a body.

Everything we perceive is reality is all interpreted by our heads. So technically, even though only their tulpamancer can see them, tulpas can be said to be as real as anything else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

I stumbled across this site few month ago and started learning about tulpas and I have to ask why isn't the phenomenon more widely known about. I mean some of the things tulpas can do are truly amazing. Is it just hard to believe and thats why its not mainstream?

 

Welcome to the forums.

To answer your question, I think it's for the best that this stays under wraps. Society as a whole isn't ready for something as profound as creating a sentient being. I could easily see frivolous people creating tulpas for selfish reasons and then dissipating them when they get bored.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

If it were possible to "like" a comment, I'd like this at least three times. There are so many reasons why everyone doesn't have a tulpa—heck, we're still trying to figure out how our own consciousness works, let alone the possibility of more than one inhabiting a body.

 

Honestly, I thought Evil's post was overdramatic.

 

The real reason most people don't have a tulpa is because most people haven't heard of it.

 

It's easy to assume, here in our little corner of the internet, that multiplicity is well-known. We see other multiples and tulpamancers and soulbonders, and we assume that because it happens in so many places that it must be widespread. That's it's a natural assumption that ay mental constructs you have might be autonomous.

 

Nope. We are a completely obscure corner of the internet. Most people have never heard the word "tulpa," and most of those who have? They heard it from a Creepypasta and think it's just a spooky fiction.

 

The reasons Evil listed are good reasons why so many people who attempt tulpamancy fail. But it's not why most people don't have a tulpa.

 

Most people have never heard of tulpas. Simple as that.

~ Member of SparrowNR's System ~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^

 

Ohoho~

 

Perhaps you are right. But I'm merely posting what I deduced out of different cases and situations. It still surprises me how tulpamancy is actually a thing.

 

Ah, I'm too tired. I only came here to help.

« — Va, je ne te hais point ! »

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, they're good deductions. I just think they're answering a different question.

 

And ditto on the "tulpamancy is thing?" thing.

~ Member of SparrowNR's System ~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

No matter what, even if more people start to know bout it, it will still always, always be considered out there. The number one reason more people don't have tulpas is that it is new and obscure. The second bigger reason is that it is really, really fucking weird. Guys, my dearest friends, as I keep saying, face it, tulpamancy is pretty weird and for people who are different than average. :-)

 

We are used to talking to one another and so forget a bit how strange it all might seem to the average person. Try telling a stranger about it sometime. They are likely to look at you and say, you guessed it, "That sounds really fucking weird!"


This weird post was made by a frilly girly girl inside the head of a 50 year old educator, husband, father and grandfather who does not find it strange in the least that she is talking through him. <--that is weird.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It still surprises me how tulpamancy is actually a thing.

 

I was going to say, I effectively had all of the beliefs a normal tulpamancer has without knowing of tulpas. Then I realized what exactly my practice with "tulpamancy" was back then.

 

I didn't tell anyone. Not because I was afraid of judgement, I just logically knew people wouldn't understand and it wasn't worth trying to explain. It was a completely internal and personal thing, there was no reason to tell anyone anyways. Even my close friends did not know I had "sentient imaginary friends", just that I had some sort of obsession with Reisen. I only ever told one friend because they were the only one who bothered trying to understand and learn from me, so I deemed them worth the effort. They're the one who I learned the term "tulpa" from, afterward.

 

So... I agree. I don't agree in the sense that this phenomenon is strange or unnatural, but I do agree in the sense that it's weird "tulpamancy" is a thing. Must've been some brave souls who pioneered communities for this sort of thing, knowing the types of reactions and criticisms they'd get.

 

 

Wait, they were just bronies. Nevermind.

 

Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.

Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.

My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really do wonder how many people do have tulpas or something like them, but don't tell anyone because they think people would think they're nuts. I'm also rather curious how many kids have imaginary friends.

 

I for one did not, and pretty much all the tulpamancer beliefs were new to me. As a kid, I knew imaginary friends existed. It wasn't something that seemed intuitive for me to do, and the way it was presented to me, it was a thing only sad lonely kids did. Looking back, I definitely didn't have many friends and more or less fit into the demographic, but I was usually happy to have more time to myself and didn't miss the friends I didn't have.

 

When I first found out about tulpas, it struck me as having more in common with insanity than with imaginary friends -- I knew the brain could produce hallucinations, have separate personalities, and so forth, but really just associated with various mental illnesses. It struck me as something that was possible since it was presented from a psychological standpoint, though it hadn't occurred to me before that such things could be forced or that one would want to do so. So, when I started, I assumed this was something pretty new in modern society though it had ancient roots in other societies. I assumed that nearly anyone I told about it would probably either think I'm nuts or see it as a strange and exotic mind trick.

 

Of the people I've told, responses have mostly been neutral ("interesting but couldn't see myself making one") to positive ("I had something like that back in high school"). I was surprised more didn't think it was crazy -- then again most of the people I've mentioned it to consider normal to be boring. Of course I still recommend distancing yourself from the topic when you first bring it up with someone (i.e. mention it as something odd you read about, rather than something you're doing). Then you can judge their reaction and choose whether to mention that you're doing it or to agree with them that people on the internet be crazy.

 

Must've been some brave souls who pioneered communities for this sort of thing, knowing the types of reactions and criticisms they'd get.

Well, they knew they didn't have to mention it to anyone outside of 4chan where it doesn't matter if people think you're nuts.

 

 

Wait, they were just bronies. Nevermind.

 

The two who really founded it weren't. They made human and anime tulpas. The influx of bronies came when the tulpa threads moves from /x/ [paranormal] to /mlp/ [ponies]. /x/ trolled the threads too much, and /a/ [anime] showed some interest but the janitors there kept deleting the threads.

Lyra: human female, ~17

Evan: boy, ~14, was an Eevee

Anera: anime-style girl, ~12; Lyra made her

My blog :: Time expectations are bad (forcing time targets are good though)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah I know. It was a joke on how bronies spread the MLP fandom so shamelessly despite a similar lack of understanding to outsiders, but were more than comfortable inside it. I was a brony until the end of season 2 too, it was fun before it became "cancerous".

 

Ironically right when season 1 came out was the largest time of development for my tulpas, yet I never remotely thought about relating the two. Pinkie Pie was my favorite by far, but the idea of a pony tulpa seemed laughable even then.

 

 

... Sorry.

 

Hi! I'm Lumi, host of Reisen, Tewi, Flandre and Lucilyn.

Everyone deserves to love and be loved. It's human nature.

My tulpas and I have a Q&A thread, which was the first (and largest) of its kind. Feel free to ask us stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...