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Poll: How does negative sentiment during narration affect a tulpa?
It doesn't
Distracts the host
Makes the tulpa feel bad
Negatively affects the tulpa's development
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[Narration] A Bit of a Narration Guide
waffles Offline
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Default  A Bit of a Narration Guide
The poll
Don't answer unless you know, because you yourself have a tulpa. No guesses please.

Pointless foreword
Narration is pretty much the most important step in tulpa creation - I think so, at least, and I would expect most to agree. But how many narration guides are there? I can't see any. There are a load of nice guides for everything else, but still people rock up into Q&A and ask basic questions about narration. They could put in a bit of effort and search the section for their question, which has likely been answered ten times before, for sure. But why do that when you can read a guide? So here's a guide.


The actual guide
This is all my opinion on what you should do. Don't take it as the divine word, but take some hints at least. Even if some of this isn't necessary, it might help your narration to be more productive. That said, this is only a guide, so don't treat it like the law.

When to do it?
If you're going to do personality, but haven't started it yet, then don't. If you're underway with, or have finished, personality then do it. If you're not going to do personality, then do it. If your tulpa isn't vocal and you fit the above criteria, then do it. If they're already speaking back then you probably needn't read this.

Starting off; get an idea of your tulpa
So you want to narrate? It's not just talking to yourself, or talking out loud, it's talking to your tulpa. Before you start with the ridiculous monologue, you should get a sense of who you're talking to. If you've done or are doing form, or personality, or even just an introductory session, then you should probably have in your mind some idea of your tulpa. If haven't done any of this and you don't have any idea of your tulpa, then do one of them, or just try your best to get an idea of your tulpa through visualisation. If you visualise them as a fluffy cloud then you can talk to the cloud, and so on - more generally, you can visualise your tulpa and talk to that.
NB: This isn't strictly necessary, it just helps most. It is far easier to narrate productively when you have something to narrate to, but not necessary, and if you think you can manage talking to your tulpa without this then by all means do. Having an idea of your tulpa helps by giving you something to narrate to. This makes it, on the whole, easier to narrate, and likely more productive too.

Starting off; focusing
At this point you should have some concept of your tulpa in your head. If you don't, jump back a section. If you do, great! Now it's time to talk at length; or, it isn't. As I have already said, you need to talk to your tulpa. When you start narrating, the most important thing is to get into the habit of addressing your tulpa. Make a conscious effort to talk to the idea of your tulpa that you have. You can talk complete gibberish for all it matters, just get the hang of talking to your tulpa. Consistently address them by their name. If you suddenly realise you've been talking to yourself, it's not a big deal. Stop and refocus. To reiterate, the most important thing is who you're talking to right now.

Actually narrating
So now you can talk to your tulpa? Great. If you feel as though you've got the hang of that, then you probably won't need to ever revisit it, even if you think you've lost it. Then, the next step; talking. Talk to your tulpa about anything. It doesn't matter what you say, as long as what you're saying has some sort of meaning. You should try to communicate in words rather than ideas - this helps to build language in them, which helps later on in the creation process. Narrate at any time, anywhere. It doesn't matter if you're not focusing 100% on narrating. The important thing now is to narrate all the time.

I don't know what the hell to talk about
You don't? Idiot. Anything.
Talk about what's going on around you; explain what you're doing, or what others are doing. Talk about what you're studying (if you're studying). Rant about politics, or history, or your favourite TV show. Explain the deeper meaning behind Tim Hecker's latest album. Make things up at random. Talk about your relationships, your problems, your sources of pain and stress; narration can be therapeutic. And so on.

Continuing
Been doing this for a while? Great. Do it more. Unless your tulpa's speaking, you should be speaking. Don't think you can skimp on narration afterwards, either. It helps with fluency, with a clearer voice, with development in general.


FAQ
Because questions are asked frequently. Because these things would break the flow of the main guide. Because the reader is assumed to be lazy.

Is this all necessary?
I'd say you need to narrate. This guide, however, is not the only way to go about it.

Can I narrate about...?
Yes. You won't give your tulpa 'bad energy' by telling them about what makes you angry. If you're narrating 'about' something then it's not going to be bad.

Can I narrate through...?
Reading to your tulpa counts as narration. Anything that involves speaking words to your tulpa is narration; it's all good.

Can I narrate while...?
Unless you're performing a task that requires all of your concentration, then you can narrate while doing it. Mopping floors at some poorly-paid job? Great time to narrate? Driving? Try not to get too into it, but if it's not seriously affecting your concentration then do it.

Is it bad to narrate while angry/frustrated?
Opinions differ, but I'd say no. If you're losing focus because of your emotion, then you'll be less productive, but it's not actually detrimental. If you think your 'negative emotions' are getting to them, that's not really that bad either. They live in your head, and they're going to have to get used to your emotion at some point. It's not going to make your tulpa evil; worst case, they get upset themselves.

Can I narrate in my head?
Yes. By all means.

Should I narrate out loud?
It's preferable. Speaking out loud is better for narration; it helps to differentiate your from your tulpa. Even muttering under your breath helps. But again, it's not necessary.

Am I doing it wrong?
It's very unlikely. Whatever your problem, you'd have a hell of a job actually narrating wrong.

How long am I going to be doing this?
Hour counts are evil etc. Aside, anywhere from a few days to a few months. You'd be somewhat unlucky to be narrating for more than two months if you're actually putting any effort into it. If you have autism and you had a harem of imaginary friends as a child, then expect to be narrating for less time.

This all seems somewhat complicated.
I've embellished the process with more detail than most will need, just for the sake of making sure. It's simple, really; talk to your tulpa until they talk back.

This is boring.
Talk about whatever you enjoy talking about. If you don't like talking, then just do it anyway. Why have a tulpa if you don't like talking?

I get distracted. What to do?
At least this is a question. Do something else while narrating. It honestly helps. If not, then talk about something you enjoy talking about. If not, narrate from a book or comic or whatever. If you still can't concentrate, then you should take some concentration-enhancing drugs, and God help you when you get down to proper forcing.


In closing
If you still have questions, then ask someone, be it me or anyone else, here or in Q&A. Remember to have fun narrating.
(This post was last modified: 02-01-2014, 09:25 PM by waffles.)
12-23-2012, 11:07 PM
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Sing Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
So I must ask, what are your opinions of parroting with narration similar to JD1215 and Fede's methods (they are pretty much the same method in that respect)?
12-24-2012, 01:08 AM
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Maria92 Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
A million times, thank you. I haven't seen much in the way of narrating guidance at all, and this really helps. Thanks.

Slayer of Threads
12-24-2012, 04:16 AM
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TIN TIN Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
After reading a bunch of posts about you preaching narration, I'm surprised you didn't do this sooner :P

Also quick typo, you put "Male" instead of "Make."
12-24-2012, 04:33 AM
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Barktooth Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
(12-24-2012, 04:33 AM)TIN TIN Wrote: Also quick typo, you put "Male" instead of "Make."
Noticed it too.

But thanks for the guide man, I was always unsure if I was "doing it right". Now I've got more confidence Smile
12-24-2012, 04:54 AM
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Vos Offline
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Default  RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
Thank you. This has helped me out quite a bit.
12-24-2012, 05:50 AM
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Vampire13 Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
Thankyou for this waffles, as a new person coming into the world of Tulpamancers, narration was one of the areas I understood least, but this helped heaps.

Name: Stranger (Until further notice)
Form: Human female
Birthday: 21-12-2012
Stage: Narration/Visualisation

Name: Carer (Until further notice)
Form: Human female
Birthday: ? (probably around the same time as Strangers)
Stage: Narration/Visualisation
12-24-2012, 11:09 AM
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waffles Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
(12-24-2012, 01:08 AM)Sing Wrote: So I must ask, what are your opinions of parroting with narration similar to JD1215 and Fede's methods (they are pretty much the same method in that respect)?
I don't feel strongly about parroting. It's not narration though, and thus will not be covered in this guide



Fixed a few typos; thanks TIN TIN.
12-24-2012, 11:20 AM
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ToskaWabi Offline
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RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
Thanks for this. This really helped me.
12-24-2012, 02:14 PM
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Purlox Offline
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Default  RE: A Bit of a Narration Guide
(12-23-2012, 11:07 PM)waffles Wrote: Starting off; get an idea of your tulpa
So you want to narrate? It's not just talking to yourself, or talking out loud, it's talking to your tulpa. Before you start with the ridiculous monologue, you need to get a sense of who you're talking to. If you've done or are doing form, or personality, or even just this excellent introductory session, then you should probably have in your mind some idea of your tulpa. If haven't done any of this and you don't have any idea of your tulpa, then do one of them, or just try your best to get an idea of your tulpa through visualisation. If you visualise them as a fluffy cloud then you can talk to the cloud, and so on.
Why do you think it's better to first do one of these before narrating?

(12-23-2012, 11:07 PM)waffles Wrote: You should try to communicate in words rather than ideas.
Why do you think they should do it?

(12-23-2012, 11:07 PM)waffles Wrote: Can I narrate about x?
Yes. You won't give your tulpa 'bad energy' by telling them about what makes you angry. If you're narrating 'about' something then it's not going to be bad.
I asked few tulpae (I can't ask mine, because I don't do this with them) and they report that ranting don't feel as well as their hosts just talking to them.
12-24-2012, 09:14 PM
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